2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616150
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Isoniazid Preventive Therapy (IPT) Defaulting: Who Are Responsible?
Author(s):
Roets, Lizeth; Okoli, Emmanuel Ikechukwu
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Tau Lambda-at-Large
Author Details:
Lizeth Roets, roetsl@unisa.ac.za; Emmanuel Ikechukwu Okoli, MD
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 23, 2016 and Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been identified as the strongest risk factor in the reactivation of latent or new Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection to active TB disease. TB is also the commonest cause of morbidity and mortality among the HIV-infected population in South Africa and studies have shown that TB accelerates HIV disease progression. Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) is one of the interventions recommended by the WHO and the South African NDOH for the prevention of progression to active TB disease in people living with HIV (PLHIV). The aim of the study was to describe the incidence of TB amongst HIV-positive clients who received IPT in a Primary Health Care Clinic and to identify the factors assosiated with defaulting. 'Methods: Quantitative non-experimental descriptive retrospective cohort study was undertaken to ascertain the incidence of tuberculosis among adult HIV positive clients who received IPT. 104 clinic records of HIV positive adult clients accessing care at a Clinic in South Africa who were commenced on IPT between 01 July 2010 and 30 November 2011 were analysed. Results: The study findings revieled'that 66 of 104 (63.5%) study respondents completed the course of IPT and the majority of those that defaulted were due to poor quality of care. Gender was statistically found to have played a role on whether a patient completes IPT. None of the study respondents that completed IPT was diagnosed with TB disease. Conclusion: It remains a serious concern that inadequacies or incompetence of healthcare providers were the main reasons for defaulting Isoniazid Preventive Therapy as isoniazid was not dispensed to the patients, despite the evidence of the effectiveness of the therapy as none of the patients who completed the course of IPT contracted active TB disease during the duration of the study. Intervention strategies to improve uptake of IPT must be advocated.The findings should benefit policy makers, healthcare professionals, and particularly the patients in need.
Keywords:
antiretroviral therapy; Isoniazid preventive therapy; tuberculosis
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16PST276; INRC16PST276
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleIsoniazid Preventive Therapy (IPT) Defaulting: Who Are Responsible?en
dc.contributor.authorRoets, Lizethen
dc.contributor.authorOkoli, Emmanuel Ikechukwuen
dc.contributor.departmentTau Lambda-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsLizeth Roets, roetsl@unisa.ac.za; Emmanuel Ikechukwu Okoli, MDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616150-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 23, 2016 and Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been identified as the strongest risk factor in the reactivation of latent or new Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection to active TB disease. TB is also the commonest cause of morbidity and mortality among the HIV-infected population in South Africa and studies have shown that TB accelerates HIV disease progression. Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) is one of the interventions recommended by the WHO and the South African NDOH for the prevention of progression to active TB disease in people living with HIV (PLHIV). The aim of the study was to describe the incidence of TB amongst HIV-positive clients who received IPT in a Primary Health Care Clinic and to identify the factors assosiated with defaulting. 'Methods: Quantitative non-experimental descriptive retrospective cohort study was undertaken to ascertain the incidence of tuberculosis among adult HIV positive clients who received IPT. 104 clinic records of HIV positive adult clients accessing care at a Clinic in South Africa who were commenced on IPT between 01 July 2010 and 30 November 2011 were analysed. Results: The study findings revieled'that 66 of 104 (63.5%) study respondents completed the course of IPT and the majority of those that defaulted were due to poor quality of care. Gender was statistically found to have played a role on whether a patient completes IPT. None of the study respondents that completed IPT was diagnosed with TB disease. Conclusion: It remains a serious concern that inadequacies or incompetence of healthcare providers were the main reasons for defaulting Isoniazid Preventive Therapy as isoniazid was not dispensed to the patients, despite the evidence of the effectiveness of the therapy as none of the patients who completed the course of IPT contracted active TB disease during the duration of the study. Intervention strategies to improve uptake of IPT must be advocated.The findings should benefit policy makers, healthcare professionals, and particularly the patients in need.en
dc.subjectantiretroviral therapyen
dc.subjectIsoniazid preventive therapyen
dc.subjecttuberculosisen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:05:38Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:05:38Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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