Hookah Smoking Among College Students: Factors Associated With a Trendy Risk Behavior

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616160
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Hookah Smoking Among College Students: Factors Associated With a Trendy Risk Behavior
Author(s):
Norris, Susan M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Eta Mu
Author Details:
Susan M. Norris, RN, susan.norris@camden.rutgers.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Thursday, July 21, 2016 and Friday, July 22, 2016: Purpose: The purpose of this research was to investigate hookah smoking behaviors and beliefs among college students.' More specifically, the study examined the practice of hookah smoking in college students ages 18-24 years, and tested hypothesized relationships between hookah use and perceptions, attitudes, subjective norms and trait sensation seeking. ' Adolescence and young adulthood are critical times for developing lifelong healthy habits.' Although cigarette use has declined, Hookah (waterpipe) use among youth is rapidly increasing in prevalence, with 10-20% of US adolescents and young adults reporting use in the previous month. Health risks are similar to cigarette smoking, yet hookah is perceived as safer and healthier, and typically occurs in a social setting. Little is known about factors associated with hookah smoking in this population. ' Methods: A descriptive correlational research design was implemented. 'A convenience sample was recruited from a large university in the United States.' A sample of 74 subjects returned completed surveys, including a socio-demographic form, a 43-item hookah questionnaire and the sensation seeking scale.'' Results: The majority of the participants were female (n=58, 78.4%); mean age 21 (SD= 1.38); 54.8 % Caucasian, 16.4 % Hispanic, 15.1 % African American, 13.7 % Asian American. Two-thirds (66.7%) of the subjects reported ever using hookah; 6.8% reported use during the previous month.' Males and females reported lifetime use at similar rates (67.2% male, 68.8% female). 'Subject data was grouped into ever users and never users. Ever users reported more positive attitudes (X2= 3.86, df=1, p=.05), lower perceived harm (X2=19.79, df=6, p=.003), higher social acceptability (subjective norms, t=2.652, df=64, p=.01) and more sensation seeking behaviors (t=4.622, df=72, p=.000).' Correlational analysis demonstrated relationships between the frequency of hookah use and social acceptability (r=.523, p=.000), lower perceived harm (r=-.346, p=.003) and sensation seeking (r=.44, p=.000). Conclusion: Findings contribute to the knowledge base regarding the perceptions and practice of hookah smoking in this population. Misconceptions present a risk to youth who are unaware of potential consequences. The significant differences found between ever smokers and never smokers and the significant correlations between frequency and perceptions underscore a need to consider psychosocial factors in research and implementation. This study can inform efforts to design effective strategies to reduce the likelihood of youths engaging in hookah smoking.
Keywords:
Health behaviors; Hookah; College students
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16PST69; INRC16PST69
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleHookah Smoking Among College Students: Factors Associated With a Trendy Risk Behavioren
dc.contributor.authorNorris, Susan M.en
dc.contributor.departmentEta Muen
dc.author.detailsSusan M. Norris, RN, susan.norris@camden.rutgers.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616160-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Thursday, July 21, 2016 and Friday, July 22, 2016: Purpose: The purpose of this research was to investigate hookah smoking behaviors and beliefs among college students.' More specifically, the study examined the practice of hookah smoking in college students ages 18-24 years, and tested hypothesized relationships between hookah use and perceptions, attitudes, subjective norms and trait sensation seeking. ' Adolescence and young adulthood are critical times for developing lifelong healthy habits.' Although cigarette use has declined, Hookah (waterpipe) use among youth is rapidly increasing in prevalence, with 10-20% of US adolescents and young adults reporting use in the previous month. Health risks are similar to cigarette smoking, yet hookah is perceived as safer and healthier, and typically occurs in a social setting. Little is known about factors associated with hookah smoking in this population. ' Methods: A descriptive correlational research design was implemented. 'A convenience sample was recruited from a large university in the United States.' A sample of 74 subjects returned completed surveys, including a socio-demographic form, a 43-item hookah questionnaire and the sensation seeking scale.'' Results: The majority of the participants were female (n=58, 78.4%); mean age 21 (SD= 1.38); 54.8 % Caucasian, 16.4 % Hispanic, 15.1 % African American, 13.7 % Asian American. Two-thirds (66.7%) of the subjects reported ever using hookah; 6.8% reported use during the previous month.' Males and females reported lifetime use at similar rates (67.2% male, 68.8% female). 'Subject data was grouped into ever users and never users. Ever users reported more positive attitudes (X2= 3.86, df=1, p=.05), lower perceived harm (X2=19.79, df=6, p=.003), higher social acceptability (subjective norms, t=2.652, df=64, p=.01) and more sensation seeking behaviors (t=4.622, df=72, p=.000).' Correlational analysis demonstrated relationships between the frequency of hookah use and social acceptability (r=.523, p=.000), lower perceived harm (r=-.346, p=.003) and sensation seeking (r=.44, p=.000). Conclusion: Findings contribute to the knowledge base regarding the perceptions and practice of hookah smoking in this population. Misconceptions present a risk to youth who are unaware of potential consequences. The significant differences found between ever smokers and never smokers and the significant correlations between frequency and perceptions underscore a need to consider psychosocial factors in research and implementation. This study can inform efforts to design effective strategies to reduce the likelihood of youths engaging in hookah smoking.en
dc.subjectHealth behaviorsen
dc.subjectHookahen
dc.subjectCollege studentsen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:05:53Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:05:53Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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