Teaching Clinical Judgment and Decision-Making: A Cognitive Processing Model for the Education of Entry-Level Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616166
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Teaching Clinical Judgment and Decision-Making: A Cognitive Processing Model for the Education of Entry-Level Nurses
Other Titles:
Teaching Strategies: Encouraging Critical Thinking
Author(s):
Woo, Ada; Dickison, Philip
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Ada Woo, awoo@ncsbn.org; Philip Dickison, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, July 25, 2016: In the United States, the landscape of healthcare has seen many changes in the past few decades. 'As an integral part of the healthcare team, nurses face many of the challenges associated with these changes.' With over three million practitioners, nursing is the largest part of the healthcare workforce in the U.S. The increase in patient acuity, aging of the population and healthcare reform have all contributed to the heightened demand for nurses in all practice levels.' In the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Future of Nursing report published in 2010, the IOM cited that nurses at all levels should practice at their full scope. As clinical judgement skills are a fundamental part of the healthcare profession, this suggested that entry-level nurses are expected to make sound clinical decisions just as their more experienced colleagues. In this proposed session, the authors will review existing models for classifying the nursing clinical judgment process and psychological research on decision-making (e.g., Benner, 2000; Harbison, 2001; Phaneuf, 2008; Saintsburg, Gibson & Pennington, 2011).' Combining current nursing clinical judgment models and cognitive psychology literature on decision-making (e.g., Oppenheimer & Kelso, 2015), the authors propose an education framework for the instruction of nursing clinical judgment.' In this proposed model, nursing clinical judgment is broken down by five procedural components: (1) cue recognition, (2) hypotheses generation, (3) hypotheses evaluation, (4) solution generation and taking action and (5) outcome evaluation.' In addition to discussing each components of the proposed model, the authors will focus on the interactions between the clinical judgment process and contextual factors that may impact clinical judgments.' These contextual factors may encompass the care environmental (e.g., resources, time constraints, distractions and task complexity), characteristics of the nurse (e.g., knowledge, experience and perceptions) and characteristics of the client (e.g., disease progression and family dynamics). This proposed nursing clinical judgment model is useful as a pedagogical tool in training entry-level nurses to make sound clinical decisions.' It also serves as a tool for understanding how nurses make decisions in the clinical setting.' The authors will conclude the session by applying the model to several clinical nursing scenarios that will illustrate how the model may be used for training of entry-level nurses.
Keywords:
Nursing clinical judgment; Decision-making; Entry-level nursing practice
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16P09; INRC16P09
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleTeaching Clinical Judgment and Decision-Making: A Cognitive Processing Model for the Education of Entry-Level Nursesen
dc.title.alternativeTeaching Strategies: Encouraging Critical Thinkingen
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Adaen
dc.contributor.authorDickison, Philipen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsAda Woo, awoo@ncsbn.org; Philip Dickison, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616166-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, July 25, 2016: In the United States, the landscape of healthcare has seen many changes in the past few decades. 'As an integral part of the healthcare team, nurses face many of the challenges associated with these changes.' With over three million practitioners, nursing is the largest part of the healthcare workforce in the U.S. The increase in patient acuity, aging of the population and healthcare reform have all contributed to the heightened demand for nurses in all practice levels.' In the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Future of Nursing report published in 2010, the IOM cited that nurses at all levels should practice at their full scope. As clinical judgement skills are a fundamental part of the healthcare profession, this suggested that entry-level nurses are expected to make sound clinical decisions just as their more experienced colleagues. In this proposed session, the authors will review existing models for classifying the nursing clinical judgment process and psychological research on decision-making (e.g., Benner, 2000; Harbison, 2001; Phaneuf, 2008; Saintsburg, Gibson & Pennington, 2011).' Combining current nursing clinical judgment models and cognitive psychology literature on decision-making (e.g., Oppenheimer & Kelso, 2015), the authors propose an education framework for the instruction of nursing clinical judgment.' In this proposed model, nursing clinical judgment is broken down by five procedural components: (1) cue recognition, (2) hypotheses generation, (3) hypotheses evaluation, (4) solution generation and taking action and (5) outcome evaluation.' In addition to discussing each components of the proposed model, the authors will focus on the interactions between the clinical judgment process and contextual factors that may impact clinical judgments.' These contextual factors may encompass the care environmental (e.g., resources, time constraints, distractions and task complexity), characteristics of the nurse (e.g., knowledge, experience and perceptions) and characteristics of the client (e.g., disease progression and family dynamics). This proposed nursing clinical judgment model is useful as a pedagogical tool in training entry-level nurses to make sound clinical decisions.' It also serves as a tool for understanding how nurses make decisions in the clinical setting.' The authors will conclude the session by applying the model to several clinical nursing scenarios that will illustrate how the model may be used for training of entry-level nurses.en
dc.subjectNursing clinical judgmenten
dc.subjectDecision-makingen
dc.subjectEntry-level nursing practiceen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:06:02Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:06:02Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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