Establishing a Research Academy Collaborative: Benefits, Challenges, and Preliminary Outcomes

10.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616181
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Establishing a Research Academy Collaborative: Benefits, Challenges, and Preliminary Outcomes
Other Titles:
The Effects of Magnet Designation
Author(s):
Long, JoAnn D.; Ashcraft, Alyce; Ford, Cindy; Roney, Jamie K.; Stennett, Charles Randall; Baggerly, Karen; LeClair Smith, Collen; Fallon, Lisa Marguerite
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Iota Mu
Author Details:
JoAnn D. Long, RN, NEA-BC, joann.long@lcu.edu; Alyce Ashcraft, RN, CNE, FNGNA, ANEF; Cindy Ford, RN, CNE; Jamie K. Roney, RN-BC, CCRN-K; Charles Randall Stennett, CHSE; Karen Baggerly, RN, NEA-BC; Collen LeClair Smith, RN; Lisa Marguerite Fallon, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: Internationally, recognition of the need to build nursing capacity facilitating research utilization, translation, and dissemination is growing (Beal, 2012).' As interest in achieving Magnet recognition expands, attention is being drawn to the importance of advancing the research utilization skill set of practicing nurses (ANA, 2014).' Yet, clinical nurses frequently express feeling intimidated by research.' Registered nurses claim multiple reasons for not engaging in evidence-based practice (EBP)--including the lack of knowledge/preparation to do so (Yoder, et al., 2014).''To address this problem in a southwestern state, a research director in a department of nursing in a private university, and an associate dean for research in a school of nursing at a state funded health sciences center, and Magnet leaders at two acute care hospitals collaborated to create a ?Research Academy.? The Research Academy initiative was intended to foster the advancement of EBP, research, and quality improvement among junior faculty and nurses practicing in hospitals on the journey to Magnet recognition.' The purpose of this project is to discuss the conceptualization, implementation, benefits, and challenges and to report the preliminary outcomes of the Research Academy'collaborative effort. Methods: A descriptive design was used.' Cohort 1 spanned the 2014-2015 academic year. 'The Research Academy (RA) curriculum plan was created and presented once a month in a 1.5 hour session. Topics pertaining to research, evidence-based practice, and quality improvement were presented by research faculty from each institution as well as two Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) students.' Participants were expected to identify a project, conduct a literature search, and carry the project through to the point of readiness for preliminary/pilot implementation and presentation at the organizational level. An Iota Mu Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI) chapter small grant was obtained to offset the monthly costs associated with the RA. Results: Fifteen participants were in the 2014-2015 Research Academy (RA) cohort: 4 junior academic faculty members, and 11 clinical nurses.' Participants were paid up to 4 hours per month to attend the RA and work on their projects by their respective organizations.' Three junior faculty dropped due to demands of current enrollment in DNP programs.' Three of 11 clinical nurses remained active in the RA at the end of the 12 month period.' One participated in the preliminary phases of the replication of a multi-site, national study, one is nearing completion of the preliminary work needed for breast milk study implementation, and one placed their initial idea on hold to pursue a high-visibility project that resulted in the change in 4 state laws protecting citizens from synthetic marijuana.' Conclusion: Challenges of the Research Academy collaborative in year one included the high attrition rate in the first cohort, the need for consistent clarification of participant expectations, extension of the 12 month period and additional release time for completion of some projects. 'However, the modest, but tangible outcomes resulted in heightened awareness, momentum, and renewed support for RA cohort 2 (27 participants, now underway).' Research faculty from academic facilities may need faculty-practice or release time to successfully mentor participants.' Local STTI chapters can play a role in supporting collaborative efforts to engage clinical nurses in EBP, research, and quality improvement by rendering small grant support.' Innovative, multi-site academic-practice collaborative may help to overcome commonly cited barriers to clinical and junior faculty acquisition of EBP, research, and quality improvement skills.
Keywords:
Research, EBP, Quality Improvement; Research Academy Collaborative; Magnet
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16J04; INRC16J04
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleEstablishing a Research Academy Collaborative: Benefits, Challenges, and Preliminary Outcomesen
dc.title.alternativeThe Effects of Magnet Designationen
dc.contributor.authorLong, JoAnn D.en
dc.contributor.authorAshcraft, Alyceen
dc.contributor.authorFord, Cindyen
dc.contributor.authorRoney, Jamie K.en
dc.contributor.authorStennett, Charles Randallen
dc.contributor.authorBaggerly, Karenen
dc.contributor.authorLeClair Smith, Collenen
dc.contributor.authorFallon, Lisa Margueriteen
dc.contributor.departmentIota Muen
dc.author.detailsJoAnn D. Long, RN, NEA-BC, joann.long@lcu.edu; Alyce Ashcraft, RN, CNE, FNGNA, ANEF; Cindy Ford, RN, CNE; Jamie K. Roney, RN-BC, CCRN-K; Charles Randall Stennett, CHSE; Karen Baggerly, RN, NEA-BC; Collen LeClair Smith, RN; Lisa Marguerite Fallon, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616181-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: Internationally, recognition of the need to build nursing capacity facilitating research utilization, translation, and dissemination is growing (Beal, 2012).' As interest in achieving Magnet recognition expands, attention is being drawn to the importance of advancing the research utilization skill set of practicing nurses (ANA, 2014).' Yet, clinical nurses frequently express feeling intimidated by research.' Registered nurses claim multiple reasons for not engaging in evidence-based practice (EBP)--including the lack of knowledge/preparation to do so (Yoder, et al., 2014).''To address this problem in a southwestern state, a research director in a department of nursing in a private university, and an associate dean for research in a school of nursing at a state funded health sciences center, and Magnet leaders at two acute care hospitals collaborated to create a ?Research Academy.? The Research Academy initiative was intended to foster the advancement of EBP, research, and quality improvement among junior faculty and nurses practicing in hospitals on the journey to Magnet recognition.' The purpose of this project is to discuss the conceptualization, implementation, benefits, and challenges and to report the preliminary outcomes of the Research Academy'collaborative effort. Methods: A descriptive design was used.' Cohort 1 spanned the 2014-2015 academic year. 'The Research Academy (RA) curriculum plan was created and presented once a month in a 1.5 hour session. Topics pertaining to research, evidence-based practice, and quality improvement were presented by research faculty from each institution as well as two Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) students.' Participants were expected to identify a project, conduct a literature search, and carry the project through to the point of readiness for preliminary/pilot implementation and presentation at the organizational level. An Iota Mu Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI) chapter small grant was obtained to offset the monthly costs associated with the RA. Results: Fifteen participants were in the 2014-2015 Research Academy (RA) cohort: 4 junior academic faculty members, and 11 clinical nurses.' Participants were paid up to 4 hours per month to attend the RA and work on their projects by their respective organizations.' Three junior faculty dropped due to demands of current enrollment in DNP programs.' Three of 11 clinical nurses remained active in the RA at the end of the 12 month period.' One participated in the preliminary phases of the replication of a multi-site, national study, one is nearing completion of the preliminary work needed for breast milk study implementation, and one placed their initial idea on hold to pursue a high-visibility project that resulted in the change in 4 state laws protecting citizens from synthetic marijuana.' Conclusion: Challenges of the Research Academy collaborative in year one included the high attrition rate in the first cohort, the need for consistent clarification of participant expectations, extension of the 12 month period and additional release time for completion of some projects. 'However, the modest, but tangible outcomes resulted in heightened awareness, momentum, and renewed support for RA cohort 2 (27 participants, now underway).' Research faculty from academic facilities may need faculty-practice or release time to successfully mentor participants.' Local STTI chapters can play a role in supporting collaborative efforts to engage clinical nurses in EBP, research, and quality improvement by rendering small grant support.' Innovative, multi-site academic-practice collaborative may help to overcome commonly cited barriers to clinical and junior faculty acquisition of EBP, research, and quality improvement skills.en
dc.subjectResearch, EBP, Quality Improvementen
dc.subjectResearch Academy Collaborativeen
dc.subjectMagneten
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:06:22Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:06:22Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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