2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616188
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Identifying Staff Nurses' Perceptions of "Hatarakinikusa" in Hospitals
Author(s):
Kashima, Kasane; Funashima, Naomi; Nakayama, Toshiko
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Kasane Kashima, RN, kashim@chiba-u.jp; Naomi Funashima, RN; Toshiko Nakayama, RN, DNSc
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 23, 2016 and Sunday, July 24, 2016: The concept of "Hatarakinikusa" is a Japanese concept familiar to ones life at work and expressing one's negative or disagreeable perceptions about situations or other factors in one's workplace which prevent it from being a good place to work. Nurses' positive work environments enhance not only their satisfaction but also improve patient safety and quality of care. Although a large number of studies aimed at creating a positive work environment for nurses exist, there are not many studies focusing on Japanese nurses' perceptions of their work environment compared with other countries, and no study has identified the overall aspect of "Hatarakinikusa", even though it reflects their perceptions of the work environment directly. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify staff nurses' perceptions of "Hatarakinikusa" in hospitals in Japan from their perceptions, and to discuss how individual nurses reduce "Haratakinikusa" to make their workplaces a good place to work. Methods: A questionnaire asking for nurses' perceptions of "Hatarakinikusa" in their workplace was created for this study. Content validity of the questionnaire was established by conducting two pilot studies. Content analysis for nursing education based on Berelson's methodology was applied. Results: Four hundred and forty-five nurses returned (return rate 55.8%) and valid responses were analyzed. Thirty-seven categories expressing staff nurses' perceptions of "Hatarakinikusa" included; 1)the presence of personnel whose characteristics are not desirable for collaboration, 2)a poor level of establishment of the collaboration system, 3)an absence of personnel who willingly respond to requests to communicate about work situations, 4)negative responses to requests to exercise one's occupational rights, 5)demands for attendance at activities which encroach upon ones? private life, 6)compulsory work-related study regardless of necessity or one's willingness. Conclusion: Thirty-seven categories expressing staff nurses' perceptions of "Hatarakinikusa" were identified. Two things were mainly suggested that 1) not only organizational but also individual nurses' contributions are important to reduce "Hatarakinikusa", and 2) by decreasing "Hatarakinikusa", quality of care could be improved as a result of nurses remaining in their jobs for a longer time and developing their careers.
Keywords:
work environments; staff nurses' perceptions; Hatarakinikusa
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16PST258; INRC16PST258
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy
Note:
This item was accepted for inclusion in the 2016 International Nursing Research Congress, but was not presented at the event.; This item was accepted for inclusion in the 2016 International Nursing Research Congress, but was not presented at the event.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleIdentifying Staff Nurses' Perceptions of "Hatarakinikusa" in Hospitalsen
dc.contributor.authorKashima, Kasaneen
dc.contributor.authorFunashima, Naomien
dc.contributor.authorNakayama, Toshikoen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsKasane Kashima, RN, kashim@chiba-u.jp; Naomi Funashima, RN; Toshiko Nakayama, RN, DNScen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616188-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 23, 2016 and Sunday, July 24, 2016: The concept of "Hatarakinikusa" is a Japanese concept familiar to ones life at work and expressing one's negative or disagreeable perceptions about situations or other factors in one's workplace which prevent it from being a good place to work. Nurses' positive work environments enhance not only their satisfaction but also improve patient safety and quality of care. Although a large number of studies aimed at creating a positive work environment for nurses exist, there are not many studies focusing on Japanese nurses' perceptions of their work environment compared with other countries, and no study has identified the overall aspect of "Hatarakinikusa", even though it reflects their perceptions of the work environment directly. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify staff nurses' perceptions of "Hatarakinikusa" in hospitals in Japan from their perceptions, and to discuss how individual nurses reduce "Haratakinikusa" to make their workplaces a good place to work. Methods: A questionnaire asking for nurses' perceptions of "Hatarakinikusa" in their workplace was created for this study. Content validity of the questionnaire was established by conducting two pilot studies. Content analysis for nursing education based on Berelson's methodology was applied. Results: Four hundred and forty-five nurses returned (return rate 55.8%) and valid responses were analyzed. Thirty-seven categories expressing staff nurses' perceptions of "Hatarakinikusa" included; 1)the presence of personnel whose characteristics are not desirable for collaboration, 2)a poor level of establishment of the collaboration system, 3)an absence of personnel who willingly respond to requests to communicate about work situations, 4)negative responses to requests to exercise one's occupational rights, 5)demands for attendance at activities which encroach upon ones? private life, 6)compulsory work-related study regardless of necessity or one's willingness. Conclusion: Thirty-seven categories expressing staff nurses' perceptions of "Hatarakinikusa" were identified. Two things were mainly suggested that 1) not only organizational but also individual nurses' contributions are important to reduce "Hatarakinikusa", and 2) by decreasing "Hatarakinikusa", quality of care could be improved as a result of nurses remaining in their jobs for a longer time and developing their careers.en
dc.subjectwork environmentsen
dc.subjectstaff nurses' perceptionsen
dc.subjectHatarakinikusaen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:06:34Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:06:34Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
dc.description.noteThis item was accepted for inclusion in the 2016 International Nursing Research Congress, but was not presented at the event.-
dc.description.noteThis item was accepted for inclusion in the 2016 International Nursing Research Congress, but was not presented at the event.en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.