Communication Satisfaction and Job Satisfaction Among Executive Nurses and Impact on Burnout and Turnover Intention

24.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616208
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Communication Satisfaction and Job Satisfaction Among Executive Nurses and Impact on Burnout and Turnover Intention
Author(s):
Vermeir, P.; Bekaert, Florence; Billiet, Nele; Verhaeghe, Rik; Vogelaers, D.; Mariman, An; Vandijck, D.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Rho Chi-at-Large
Author Details:
P. Vermeir, RN, Peter.Vermeir@UGent.be; Florence Bekaert; Nele Billiet; Rik Verhaeghe, RN; D. Vogelaers, PhD; An Mariman, MD; D. Vandijck, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 23, 2016 and Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: Within a hospital, the main task of executive nurses is to manage their team and to organize associated processes as to provide high quality care to patients. Appropriate communication skills are, as such, a key success factor. Efficient communication ensures higher job satisfaction resulting in lower turnover intention and decreased burnout. This study aimed to explore the relationship between communication satisfaction and job satisfaction and the impact on burnout and turnover intention among a cohort of executive nurses. Methods: In a multicentre study in three hospitals, data were collected on communication satisfaction and job satisfaction in a large sample of nurses (n = 1455). Data included (1) the Communication Satisfaction Questionnaire (Downs & Hazen, 1977) (translated in Dutch and subsequently validated and pilot tested), (2) the scale ?Turnover intention? of the Questionnaire on the Experience and Evaluation of Labour and (Van Veldhoven & Meijman, 1994), (3) the Maslach Burnout Inventory (Maslach et al., 1996). Job satisfaction was measured by means of a visual analogue scale. Within this large sample, executive nurses were selected and compared to nursing staff in general. Results: Within the three participating hospitals, respectively 106 executive nurses and 1349 ward nurses completed the questionnaire; 68.9% (73/106) of the respondents are female. The executive nurses have an average age of 48 years. Their mean work experience is 26.0 years. The vast majority works on a fulltime basis (94.3%, 100/106). An average job satisfaction level of 7.59/10 was found. Only one person had a score ? 5 on job satisfaction (0.95%, 1/106). Concerning communication satisfaction, executives were found most satisfied with the trust received from their supervisor (90.6%) and least with their communication overload (45.3%). 57.5% (61/104) has a low, 36.8% (39/104) an average and only 3.8% (4/104) a high turnover intention. None of the respondents had a burnout profile. 12.3% (13/104) has a high emotional exhaustion, 11.3% (12/104) a high depersonalization and 12.3% (13/104) a low personal accomplishment. These data were comparable with ward nurses and are summarized in the following tables.' Conclusion: Levels of job satisfaction among executive nurses are comparable to those among ward nurses. Burnout indication and turnover intention are low. Nevertheless, there is still room for improvement with regard to communication satisfaction as nurse executives experience considerable communication overload. This can be a particular focus for management in order to increase job satisfaction and to decrease the incidence of burnout and turnover intention among key collaborators within the organization.
Keywords:
executive nurses; job satisfaction; burnout
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16PST287; INRC16PST287
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleCommunication Satisfaction and Job Satisfaction Among Executive Nurses and Impact on Burnout and Turnover Intentionen
dc.contributor.authorVermeir, P.en
dc.contributor.authorBekaert, Florenceen
dc.contributor.authorBilliet, Neleen
dc.contributor.authorVerhaeghe, Riken
dc.contributor.authorVogelaers, D.en
dc.contributor.authorMariman, Anen
dc.contributor.authorVandijck, D.en
dc.contributor.departmentRho Chi-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsP. Vermeir, RN, Peter.Vermeir@UGent.be; Florence Bekaert; Nele Billiet; Rik Verhaeghe, RN; D. Vogelaers, PhD; An Mariman, MD; D. Vandijck, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616208-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 23, 2016 and Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: Within a hospital, the main task of executive nurses is to manage their team and to organize associated processes as to provide high quality care to patients. Appropriate communication skills are, as such, a key success factor. Efficient communication ensures higher job satisfaction resulting in lower turnover intention and decreased burnout. This study aimed to explore the relationship between communication satisfaction and job satisfaction and the impact on burnout and turnover intention among a cohort of executive nurses. Methods: In a multicentre study in three hospitals, data were collected on communication satisfaction and job satisfaction in a large sample of nurses (n = 1455). Data included (1) the Communication Satisfaction Questionnaire (Downs & Hazen, 1977) (translated in Dutch and subsequently validated and pilot tested), (2) the scale ?Turnover intention? of the Questionnaire on the Experience and Evaluation of Labour and (Van Veldhoven & Meijman, 1994), (3) the Maslach Burnout Inventory (Maslach et al., 1996). Job satisfaction was measured by means of a visual analogue scale. Within this large sample, executive nurses were selected and compared to nursing staff in general. Results: Within the three participating hospitals, respectively 106 executive nurses and 1349 ward nurses completed the questionnaire; 68.9% (73/106) of the respondents are female. The executive nurses have an average age of 48 years. Their mean work experience is 26.0 years. The vast majority works on a fulltime basis (94.3%, 100/106). An average job satisfaction level of 7.59/10 was found. Only one person had a score ? 5 on job satisfaction (0.95%, 1/106). Concerning communication satisfaction, executives were found most satisfied with the trust received from their supervisor (90.6%) and least with their communication overload (45.3%). 57.5% (61/104) has a low, 36.8% (39/104) an average and only 3.8% (4/104) a high turnover intention. None of the respondents had a burnout profile. 12.3% (13/104) has a high emotional exhaustion, 11.3% (12/104) a high depersonalization and 12.3% (13/104) a low personal accomplishment. These data were comparable with ward nurses and are summarized in the following tables.' Conclusion: Levels of job satisfaction among executive nurses are comparable to those among ward nurses. Burnout indication and turnover intention are low. Nevertheless, there is still room for improvement with regard to communication satisfaction as nurse executives experience considerable communication overload. This can be a particular focus for management in order to increase job satisfaction and to decrease the incidence of burnout and turnover intention among key collaborators within the organization.en
dc.subjectexecutive nursesen
dc.subjectjob satisfactionen
dc.subjectburnouten
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:07:04Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:07:04Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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