2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616227
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Measurement of Spirituality
Other Titles:
Spiritual Needs of Humans
Author(s):
Bennington, Linda K.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Epsilon Chi
Author Details:
Linda K. Bennington, RN, lbenning@odu.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: 'To develop an instrument that measures one?s unified nature (spirituality) as separate from a set of dogmatic beliefs (religion). Methods: Empirical referents are external measures of a concept grounded in the real world and are used for instrument development in research.' Clinically they assist in clearly discerning the presence of a concept (Walker & Avant, 1995).' A measurement of spirituality should include statements that reflect an individual?s belief system, a connectedness with others, a higher power, and the universe, as well as a feeling of self-worth, hope and purpose. A 30-item Likert scale (strongly agreed to strongly disagree) was created using the following concepts as guides: A sense of connectedness or oneness Transcendence A non-local presence (otherworldly) Inner peace Actualization Forgiveness Trust Unconditional giving Acceptance of the unchangeable. A pilot test resulted in a reduction to 15 items, which were edited for clarity and circulated to a convenience sample of 188 individuals.' Participants had a range of educational and socioeconomic backgrounds, and included both males and females. Results: Using factor analysis to extract the underlying communality of one factor among the items in the instrument, a scree plot of eigenvalues was obtained.' Absolute values less than 0.30 were suppressed, which resulted in three items being removed to strengthen the measure of one factor.' The Cronbach?s Alpha reliability coefficient for 12 items was 0.88, a good indication of construct reliability. 'Conclusion :Spirituality, the construct of interest for this scale, is an essential philosophy of life centered on the awareness of a pervasive universal creative force that provides a sense of interconnectedness and an awareness of purpose and meaning in life as an ongoing process to transcend the physical existence in daily life (Bennington, 2003). The existing scales in the literature that measure spirituality all include religion as part of the construct.' This instrument appears to consistently measure the factors that theoretically reflect the concept of spirituality without the concept of religion or religiosity. Additional testing on larger populations, including non-English speaking persons, would provide additional support for both the reliability of the instrument and the validity of the theoretical understanding of spirituality.
Keywords:
Spirituality; Religion and dogma; Measuring spirituality
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16M11; INRC16M11
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleA Measurement of Spiritualityen
dc.title.alternativeSpiritual Needs of Humansen
dc.contributor.authorBennington, Linda K.en
dc.contributor.departmentEpsilon Chien
dc.author.detailsLinda K. Bennington, RN, lbenning@odu.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616227-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: 'To develop an instrument that measures one?s unified nature (spirituality) as separate from a set of dogmatic beliefs (religion). Methods: Empirical referents are external measures of a concept grounded in the real world and are used for instrument development in research.' Clinically they assist in clearly discerning the presence of a concept (Walker & Avant, 1995).' A measurement of spirituality should include statements that reflect an individual?s belief system, a connectedness with others, a higher power, and the universe, as well as a feeling of self-worth, hope and purpose. A 30-item Likert scale (strongly agreed to strongly disagree) was created using the following concepts as guides: A sense of connectedness or oneness Transcendence A non-local presence (otherworldly) Inner peace Actualization Forgiveness Trust Unconditional giving Acceptance of the unchangeable. A pilot test resulted in a reduction to 15 items, which were edited for clarity and circulated to a convenience sample of 188 individuals.' Participants had a range of educational and socioeconomic backgrounds, and included both males and females. Results: Using factor analysis to extract the underlying communality of one factor among the items in the instrument, a scree plot of eigenvalues was obtained.' Absolute values less than 0.30 were suppressed, which resulted in three items being removed to strengthen the measure of one factor.' The Cronbach?s Alpha reliability coefficient for 12 items was 0.88, a good indication of construct reliability. 'Conclusion :Spirituality, the construct of interest for this scale, is an essential philosophy of life centered on the awareness of a pervasive universal creative force that provides a sense of interconnectedness and an awareness of purpose and meaning in life as an ongoing process to transcend the physical existence in daily life (Bennington, 2003). The existing scales in the literature that measure spirituality all include religion as part of the construct.' This instrument appears to consistently measure the factors that theoretically reflect the concept of spirituality without the concept of religion or religiosity. Additional testing on larger populations, including non-English speaking persons, would provide additional support for both the reliability of the instrument and the validity of the theoretical understanding of spirituality.en
dc.subjectSpiritualityen
dc.subjectReligion and dogmaen
dc.subjectMeasuring spiritualityen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:07:32Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:07:32Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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