Effects of Partner Violence on Mental Health and HIV Disease Progression in Women in Baltimore

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616255
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Partner Violence on Mental Health and HIV Disease Progression in Women in Baltimore
Other Titles:
Symposium: HIV and Intimate Partner Violence: Risks and Relationships Among Women
Author(s):
Anderson, Jocelyn; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Glass, Nancy
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Nu Beta
Author Details:
Jocelyn Anderson, RN, FNE-A, SANE-A, jocelyna@jhu.edu; Jacquelyn Campbell, RN; Nancy Glass, RN, FAAN
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, July 25, 2016: Purpose: Recently a great deal of national attention has been given to the overlapping issues of intimate partner violence (IPV) and HIV. 'The examination of this intersection has focused primarily on the increased risk of HIV acquisition in women who have experienced violence. The effects of IPV as a chronic stressor on the physical and mental health of women living with HIV has had limited examination in the research literature. To examine the prevalence of IPV and its associations with treatment markers and adherence to clinic visits in an urban clinic. Methods: Survey data regarding IPV and mental health symptoms were collected from eligible women attending an urban HIV clinic in Baltimore, MD.' Clinic records were reviewed for CD4 count, viral load and adherence to clinic visits over the year prior to the survey.' Results: Of the 169 women with completed study measures, 57% reported past year IPV.' Women who reported IPV were more likely to report symptoms of PTSD (29% vs 15%, p=0.04) and depression (35% vs 18%, p=0.02). On average, women were scheduled for 36 clinic visits in the year prior to the survey and missed 10 visits. Women who reported IPV were not more likely to miss visits than their counterparts who did not report violence.' Women reporting past year IPV were also more likely to have a CD4 count <200 (13% vs 4%, p=.04).' Conclusion: HIV nurses and providers should be aware of the high rates of IPV seen in this population and the impact it can have on health outcomes.' It does not appear from the data currently available in this study that adherence to clinic visits is playing a large role in this disparity.' Incorporating IPV screening and trauma-informed practices - inlcuding partnerships with IPV and substacne abuse agencies into clinical HIV care may be an opportunity to improve the health outcomes of these patients.
Keywords:
HIV; intimate partner violence; women
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16P10; INRC16P10
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleEffects of Partner Violence on Mental Health and HIV Disease Progression in Women in Baltimoreen
dc.title.alternativeSymposium: HIV and Intimate Partner Violence: Risks and Relationships Among Womenen
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Jocelynen
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Jacquelynen
dc.contributor.authorGlass, Nancyen
dc.contributor.departmentNu Betaen
dc.author.detailsJocelyn Anderson, RN, FNE-A, SANE-A, jocelyna@jhu.edu; Jacquelyn Campbell, RN; Nancy Glass, RN, FAANen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616255-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, July 25, 2016: Purpose: Recently a great deal of national attention has been given to the overlapping issues of intimate partner violence (IPV) and HIV. 'The examination of this intersection has focused primarily on the increased risk of HIV acquisition in women who have experienced violence. The effects of IPV as a chronic stressor on the physical and mental health of women living with HIV has had limited examination in the research literature. To examine the prevalence of IPV and its associations with treatment markers and adherence to clinic visits in an urban clinic. Methods: Survey data regarding IPV and mental health symptoms were collected from eligible women attending an urban HIV clinic in Baltimore, MD.' Clinic records were reviewed for CD4 count, viral load and adherence to clinic visits over the year prior to the survey.' Results: Of the 169 women with completed study measures, 57% reported past year IPV.' Women who reported IPV were more likely to report symptoms of PTSD (29% vs 15%, p=0.04) and depression (35% vs 18%, p=0.02). On average, women were scheduled for 36 clinic visits in the year prior to the survey and missed 10 visits. Women who reported IPV were not more likely to miss visits than their counterparts who did not report violence.' Women reporting past year IPV were also more likely to have a CD4 count <200 (13% vs 4%, p=.04).' Conclusion: HIV nurses and providers should be aware of the high rates of IPV seen in this population and the impact it can have on health outcomes.' It does not appear from the data currently available in this study that adherence to clinic visits is playing a large role in this disparity.' Incorporating IPV screening and trauma-informed practices - inlcuding partnerships with IPV and substacne abuse agencies into clinical HIV care may be an opportunity to improve the health outcomes of these patients.en
dc.subjectHIVen
dc.subjectintimate partner violenceen
dc.subjectwomenen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:08:15Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:08:15Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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