Psychometric Properties of the Perceptions of Wellness and Environment Culture Scale

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616272
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychometric Properties of the Perceptions of Wellness and Environment Culture Scale
Other Titles:
Symposium: Building Cultures and Environments of Wellness in Universities Across the U.S.: Key Strategies for Success
Author(s):
Amaya, Megan E.; Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Megan E. Amaya, CHES, AFAA, Amaya.13@osu.edu; Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, RN, CPNP/PMHNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: Healthy workplace cultures are an essential element to encouraging healthy lifestyle behaviors in faculty and staff in academic communities. Tools and health promotion programs typically used by employers for population health management include extensive awareness building through health education, health risk assessments (HRAs), risk reduction interventions, health coaching, disease management, vaccinations, web-enabled communications, social networking, establishment of data warehouses, and the use of incentives. A healthy organization cultivates a culture of respect within a community that supports personal and professional growth, open communication, and shared values. A workplace culture that includes an emphasis on wellness can benefit the organization in reduced absenteeism, reduced presenteeism, reduced injuries, and reduced healthcare-related costs. An assessment of the perceived current wellness culture and the environment is able to provide important information about where the organization is and the key areas to target with intervention strategies for improvement. Methods: An 11 item culture and environment survey was developed and disseminated to faculty and staff in a large public academic institution in the Midwest United States. Results: 97% of faculty/staff responded to the survey items. Construct validity of the scale was established through factor analysis. Cronbach?s alpha exceeded .80. The majority of respondents (67%) perceived the university to have a culture and environment that promotes health and wellness; 56% believed senior leadership is actively engaged in promoting and role modeling health and wellness; and 57% agreed they have a higher overall wellbeing because of working for the institution.' Conclusion: A workplace perceived wellness culture scale can be useful for serving as a baseline for future evaluation; for determining a worksite?s strengths; to help draw attention to areas in need of improvement; and it can highlight opportunities to make the worksite more supportive of healthy behaviors (e.g., healthy food in vending machines, no smoking policies, or encouraging walking during break times).
Keywords:
Healthy behaviors; Higher education; Worksite wellness
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16L01; INRC16L01
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titlePsychometric Properties of the Perceptions of Wellness and Environment Culture Scaleen
dc.title.alternativeSymposium: Building Cultures and Environments of Wellness in Universities Across the U.S.: Key Strategies for Successen
dc.contributor.authorAmaya, Megan E.en
dc.contributor.authorMelnyk, Bernadette Mazureken
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsMegan E. Amaya, CHES, AFAA, Amaya.13@osu.edu; Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, RN, CPNP/PMHNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAANen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616272-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: Healthy workplace cultures are an essential element to encouraging healthy lifestyle behaviors in faculty and staff in academic communities. Tools and health promotion programs typically used by employers for population health management include extensive awareness building through health education, health risk assessments (HRAs), risk reduction interventions, health coaching, disease management, vaccinations, web-enabled communications, social networking, establishment of data warehouses, and the use of incentives. A healthy organization cultivates a culture of respect within a community that supports personal and professional growth, open communication, and shared values. A workplace culture that includes an emphasis on wellness can benefit the organization in reduced absenteeism, reduced presenteeism, reduced injuries, and reduced healthcare-related costs. An assessment of the perceived current wellness culture and the environment is able to provide important information about where the organization is and the key areas to target with intervention strategies for improvement. Methods: An 11 item culture and environment survey was developed and disseminated to faculty and staff in a large public academic institution in the Midwest United States. Results: 97% of faculty/staff responded to the survey items. Construct validity of the scale was established through factor analysis. Cronbach?s alpha exceeded .80. The majority of respondents (67%) perceived the university to have a culture and environment that promotes health and wellness; 56% believed senior leadership is actively engaged in promoting and role modeling health and wellness; and 57% agreed they have a higher overall wellbeing because of working for the institution.' Conclusion: A workplace perceived wellness culture scale can be useful for serving as a baseline for future evaluation; for determining a worksite?s strengths; to help draw attention to areas in need of improvement; and it can highlight opportunities to make the worksite more supportive of healthy behaviors (e.g., healthy food in vending machines, no smoking policies, or encouraging walking during break times).en
dc.subjectHealthy behaviorsen
dc.subjectHigher educationen
dc.subjectWorksite wellnessen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:08:40Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:08:40Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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