2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616329
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Accent Modification Intervention for Nursing and Allied Health Students
Other Titles:
Student Experiences in Nursing Education
Author(s):
Freysteinson, Wyona M.; Cesario, Sandra; McWilliams, Lenora; Nibert, Ainslie; Clutter, Paula; Du, Jinlan; Goff, Marilyn M.; Belay, Hanna A.; Adams, Joshua David; Nurse, Rachelle
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Beta (Houston)
Author Details:
Wyona M. Freysteinson, RN, wfreysteinson@twu.edu; Sandra Cesario, RNC, FAAN; Lenora McWilliams, RN; Ainslie Nibert, RN, FAAN; Paula Clutter, RN; Jinlan Du, BCT, CVP, CVI; Marilyn M. Goff, AHIP; Hanna A. Belay, RN; Joshua David Adams, BA; Rachelle Nurse, WHNP-BC, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 23, 2016: Purpose: The Texas Medical Center (TMC) in the United States (US), the largest medical center in the world, has a healthcare workforce of individuals from over 150 countries. There are students enrolled in a health sciences university in the TMC who have language patterns, and in particular foreign or regional accents that may be barriers to language that is intelligible to listeners in this given language community. These communication problems may lead to speakers needing to repeat themselves in order to be understood, speakers avoiding social interactions, and frustration for both the speaker and the listener. These students may need additional support for safe clinical practice and academic success (Belay, 2013; Boughton, Halliday & Brown, 2010; Crawford & Candlin, 2013; Jeong et al., 2011). The purpose of this presentation is to share the results of a pilot project to evaluate the feasibility of an accent modification program to improve communication for nursing and other allied healthcare students in a university setting. Background: Extensive research from the Institute for Healthcare Communication (2011) indicated a strong relationship between a healthcare member?s communication skills and their patients? compliance with health care recommendations, chronic care management, and preventive health behaviors. The Joint Commission (2015) noted that communication errors are a key factor in sentinel events. US federally-regulated health care organizations invest billions of dollars in translation services, computerized charting, and stream-lined processes to enhance communication. However, the Migration Policy Institute (2012) suggested the verbal communication skills of 45% of foreign-born nurses and 27% of all foreign-born healthcare workers were not proficient. Studies have indicated that foreign-born student nurses have difficulty communicating with patients, families, and other health care workers (Boughton, et al, 2010; Jeong et al, 2011). In 2013, researchers called these healthcare communication difficulties ?uncharted territories? (Khurana & Huang, p.2). Methods: A multi-disciplinary team of faculty and staff developed a tailored accent modification program. The intervention was 12 (non-credit) one-hour classes taught by a licensed speech pathologist. We hypothesized that participants who have participated in an accent modification program would have: decreased communication apprehension, improved communication competence, enhanced self-esteem, and improved spoken language skills. Data collection included pre and post participant audio-tapes and appropriate psychometric tools. In addition, post program focus groups addressed the qualitative question: What are the experiences of students who participate in an accent modification program? Results: Nineteen graduate and undergraduate students completed the program over two semesters. A high attrition rate was noted primarily due to failure in other classes. Significant positive findings in perceived self-esteem, interpersonal communication, ability to communicate in meetings, groups, and overall communication were noted as measured before and after the program. Judging of pre and post audio-tapes showed no significant difference. Focus group results were positive. An interesting finding was that some participants indicated they understood what others were saying better. Conclusion: An accent modification program for nursing and other allied health students is feasible and may yield positive outcomes. In order to sustain this program for students, faculty, and staff at no cost, the university has begun to offer the program to healthcare providers in the TMC. The research team is in the planning stages of taking the program to a large hospital center in order to include patient safety and satisfaction indicators.
Keywords:
Accent; Communication; Language
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16H09; INRC16H09
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleAn Accent Modification Intervention for Nursing and Allied Health Studentsen
dc.title.alternativeStudent Experiences in Nursing Educationen
dc.contributor.authorFreysteinson, Wyona M.en
dc.contributor.authorCesario, Sandraen
dc.contributor.authorMcWilliams, Lenoraen
dc.contributor.authorNibert, Ainslieen
dc.contributor.authorClutter, Paulaen
dc.contributor.authorDu, Jinlanen
dc.contributor.authorGoff, Marilyn M.en
dc.contributor.authorBelay, Hanna A.en
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Joshua Daviden
dc.contributor.authorNurse, Rachelleen
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Beta (Houston)en
dc.author.detailsWyona M. Freysteinson, RN, wfreysteinson@twu.edu; Sandra Cesario, RNC, FAAN; Lenora McWilliams, RN; Ainslie Nibert, RN, FAAN; Paula Clutter, RN; Jinlan Du, BCT, CVP, CVI; Marilyn M. Goff, AHIP; Hanna A. Belay, RN; Joshua David Adams, BA; Rachelle Nurse, WHNP-BC, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616329-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 23, 2016: Purpose: The Texas Medical Center (TMC) in the United States (US), the largest medical center in the world, has a healthcare workforce of individuals from over 150 countries. There are students enrolled in a health sciences university in the TMC who have language patterns, and in particular foreign or regional accents that may be barriers to language that is intelligible to listeners in this given language community. These communication problems may lead to speakers needing to repeat themselves in order to be understood, speakers avoiding social interactions, and frustration for both the speaker and the listener. These students may need additional support for safe clinical practice and academic success (Belay, 2013; Boughton, Halliday & Brown, 2010; Crawford & Candlin, 2013; Jeong et al., 2011). The purpose of this presentation is to share the results of a pilot project to evaluate the feasibility of an accent modification program to improve communication for nursing and other allied healthcare students in a university setting. Background: Extensive research from the Institute for Healthcare Communication (2011) indicated a strong relationship between a healthcare member?s communication skills and their patients? compliance with health care recommendations, chronic care management, and preventive health behaviors. The Joint Commission (2015) noted that communication errors are a key factor in sentinel events. US federally-regulated health care organizations invest billions of dollars in translation services, computerized charting, and stream-lined processes to enhance communication. However, the Migration Policy Institute (2012) suggested the verbal communication skills of 45% of foreign-born nurses and 27% of all foreign-born healthcare workers were not proficient. Studies have indicated that foreign-born student nurses have difficulty communicating with patients, families, and other health care workers (Boughton, et al, 2010; Jeong et al, 2011). In 2013, researchers called these healthcare communication difficulties ?uncharted territories? (Khurana & Huang, p.2). Methods: A multi-disciplinary team of faculty and staff developed a tailored accent modification program. The intervention was 12 (non-credit) one-hour classes taught by a licensed speech pathologist. We hypothesized that participants who have participated in an accent modification program would have: decreased communication apprehension, improved communication competence, enhanced self-esteem, and improved spoken language skills. Data collection included pre and post participant audio-tapes and appropriate psychometric tools. In addition, post program focus groups addressed the qualitative question: What are the experiences of students who participate in an accent modification program? Results: Nineteen graduate and undergraduate students completed the program over two semesters. A high attrition rate was noted primarily due to failure in other classes. Significant positive findings in perceived self-esteem, interpersonal communication, ability to communicate in meetings, groups, and overall communication were noted as measured before and after the program. Judging of pre and post audio-tapes showed no significant difference. Focus group results were positive. An interesting finding was that some participants indicated they understood what others were saying better. Conclusion: An accent modification program for nursing and other allied health students is feasible and may yield positive outcomes. In order to sustain this program for students, faculty, and staff at no cost, the university has begun to offer the program to healthcare providers in the TMC. The research team is in the planning stages of taking the program to a large hospital center in order to include patient safety and satisfaction indicators.en
dc.subjectAccenten
dc.subjectCommunicationen
dc.subjectLanguageen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:10:03Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:10:03Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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