Integrating Evidence-Based Practice in a Lebanese Nursing Baccalaureate Program: Challenges and Successes

9.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616359
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Integrating Evidence-Based Practice in a Lebanese Nursing Baccalaureate Program: Challenges and Successes
Author(s):
Sukkarieh-Haraty, Ola; Hoffart, Nancy
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Chi Iota
Author Details:
Ola Sukkarieh-Haraty, RN, ola.sukkarieh@lau.edu.lb; Nancy Hoffart, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 23, 2016 and Sunday, July 24, 2016: Background:Evidence-based practice (EBP) is defined as ?the integration of best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values? (Sackett, et. al., 2000). 'According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (2014), registered nurses (RNs) with baccalaureate degrees are better prepared to optimize patient care, particularly by decreasing mortality rates in hospitals. Despite the inclusion of EBP as the appropriate preparation for giving bed side care, research skills remain suboptimal in enabling nurses to conduct and implement evidence-based practice (EBP). In the Middle East (ME) region, there is a pressing need to incorporate EBP into nursing curricula. Substantial attention needs to be given to increasing the appreciation for and use of evidence to guide nursing practice. Purpose: This presentation describes how we have developed the evidence-based practice concept and integrated it into two courses at two different levels of the BSN curriculum. The process of threading the concept to meet the students? learning needs and the learning assessment approaches are also described. Methods: Aligned with American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice (2008), teaching EBP is one of the educational objectives in our concept-based nursing curriculum. We integrate EBP in two courses at two levels by designing an EBP assignment at the two courses level. Results: The first step of the EBP concept is incorporated into the research course offered to junior students and introduces fundamental research concepts and utilization. In the second step, senior students in the nursing synthesis course build on the fundamental concepts to design an evidence-based practice protocol for a selected health condition.' As well, students integrate evidence, clinical reasoning, clinical judgment, interprofessional perspectives, and patient preferences in planning, implementing, and evaluating outcomes of care. In both courses students review scholarly literature to apply and nurture beginning skills in evaluating research studies. In both courses, the most important learning assessment of the EBP concept is the EBP assignment whereby students apply EBP knowledge by completing a small scale project.' The EBP assignment introduced in the research course sets the groundwork for the advanced EBP assignment required in the nursing synthesis course. In both assignments, students have to answer a clinical question using the PICO template (Population, Intervention, Comparison and Outcome) by observing a selected clinical skill, then comparing what they observed to hospital protocol and against the latest evidence-based practice guidelines. In the second assignment, students pick a more complex clinical skill that is observed in critical care and psychiatric units. Additionally, students need to support their proposed changes in practice with scholarly literature. In terms of evaluation, in the first assignment students are evaluated on the integration and cohesiveness of ideas. In the second assignment, they are evaluated on critiquing the literature and using analytical writing. Conclusion: The learning outcomes assigned for both courses are achieved. The overall experience of integrating EBP concepts and projects in the curriculum is fruitful for students, hospital administrators (for the projects are shared with them) and faculty. Having students identify clinical problems encountered in their professional practice gives meaning to their observations and highlights the value of their exposure for bed side care. They are able to reflect constructively and more importantly, address the problem scientifically and systematically. EBP broadens student?s ability to synthesize concepts learned earlier in the curriculum and helps prepare them to be lifelong learners.
Keywords:
Evidence based practice in nursing curriculum; nurse educators; Evidence based practice in middle east
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16PST282; INRC16PST282
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleIntegrating Evidence-Based Practice in a Lebanese Nursing Baccalaureate Program: Challenges and Successesen
dc.contributor.authorSukkarieh-Haraty, Olaen
dc.contributor.authorHoffart, Nancyen
dc.contributor.departmentChi Iotaen
dc.author.detailsOla Sukkarieh-Haraty, RN, ola.sukkarieh@lau.edu.lb; Nancy Hoffart, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616359-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 23, 2016 and Sunday, July 24, 2016: Background:Evidence-based practice (EBP) is defined as ?the integration of best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values? (Sackett, et. al., 2000). 'According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (2014), registered nurses (RNs) with baccalaureate degrees are better prepared to optimize patient care, particularly by decreasing mortality rates in hospitals. Despite the inclusion of EBP as the appropriate preparation for giving bed side care, research skills remain suboptimal in enabling nurses to conduct and implement evidence-based practice (EBP). In the Middle East (ME) region, there is a pressing need to incorporate EBP into nursing curricula. Substantial attention needs to be given to increasing the appreciation for and use of evidence to guide nursing practice. Purpose: This presentation describes how we have developed the evidence-based practice concept and integrated it into two courses at two different levels of the BSN curriculum. The process of threading the concept to meet the students? learning needs and the learning assessment approaches are also described. Methods: Aligned with American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice (2008), teaching EBP is one of the educational objectives in our concept-based nursing curriculum. We integrate EBP in two courses at two levels by designing an EBP assignment at the two courses level. Results: The first step of the EBP concept is incorporated into the research course offered to junior students and introduces fundamental research concepts and utilization. In the second step, senior students in the nursing synthesis course build on the fundamental concepts to design an evidence-based practice protocol for a selected health condition.' As well, students integrate evidence, clinical reasoning, clinical judgment, interprofessional perspectives, and patient preferences in planning, implementing, and evaluating outcomes of care. In both courses students review scholarly literature to apply and nurture beginning skills in evaluating research studies. In both courses, the most important learning assessment of the EBP concept is the EBP assignment whereby students apply EBP knowledge by completing a small scale project.' The EBP assignment introduced in the research course sets the groundwork for the advanced EBP assignment required in the nursing synthesis course. In both assignments, students have to answer a clinical question using the PICO template (Population, Intervention, Comparison and Outcome) by observing a selected clinical skill, then comparing what they observed to hospital protocol and against the latest evidence-based practice guidelines. In the second assignment, students pick a more complex clinical skill that is observed in critical care and psychiatric units. Additionally, students need to support their proposed changes in practice with scholarly literature. In terms of evaluation, in the first assignment students are evaluated on the integration and cohesiveness of ideas. In the second assignment, they are evaluated on critiquing the literature and using analytical writing. Conclusion: The learning outcomes assigned for both courses are achieved. The overall experience of integrating EBP concepts and projects in the curriculum is fruitful for students, hospital administrators (for the projects are shared with them) and faculty. Having students identify clinical problems encountered in their professional practice gives meaning to their observations and highlights the value of their exposure for bed side care. They are able to reflect constructively and more importantly, address the problem scientifically and systematically. EBP broadens student?s ability to synthesize concepts learned earlier in the curriculum and helps prepare them to be lifelong learners.en
dc.subjectEvidence based practice in nursing curriculumen
dc.subjectnurse educatorsen
dc.subjectEvidence based practice in middle easten
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:10:45Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:10:45Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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