2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616367
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Culturally Sensitive Recruitment Model for Arabic Nursing
Other Titles:
Developing Community Awareness and Cultural Sensitivity
Author(s):
Cowman, Seamus
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Seamus Cowman, RGN, RPN, RNT, DipN, FFNMRCSI, FAAN, scowman@rcsi-mub.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 22, 2016: Background: In response to the shortage of nurses, Bahrain continues to have high dependence on expatriate nurses to maintain the health services. Bahrainization is government policy and'is'strategically aimed at including many more Bahrainis in the workforce. Consistent with Bahrainization the development and expansion of an indigenous nursing profession through increasing the number of Bahrainis working as nurses must be a health service priority. However, in attracting local candidates to study nursing, the public image of nursing in the Middle East continues to be of concern. This study aims to identify the factors that influence the High School Students and their parents in Bahrain to choose the nursing as a future career. The level of understanding and promotion of nursing inside and outside of schools in Bahrain is very unclear and indeed is the extent to which career guidance on nursing occurs. 'This study reports on a research model which tested a recruitment intervention with stakeholders in Bahrain'and based on study findings and seminal work, a unique Arabic nursing recruitment model is presented. The Positive Arabic Recruitment Model NURSE ? P.R.A.M. aims to promote nursing as a career in Bahrain. Methods: A triangulation research design was used incorporating quantitative and qualitative dimensions and an intervention. The study sample included high school students, students? parents, career guidance counselors and nursing students. An nursing recruitment intervention was tested and evaluated in a sample of Bahraini schools with High School students. SPSS was used to analyse quantitative data, while Collaizzi's (1978) methodology and Krueger?s? (1994) Framework were applied to analyse the qualitative data. Findings: At present, in Bahrain ther are 4 nurses per 1,000 of the population compared to the OECD average of 8.7. With the current numbers of students interested in nursing, it will be impossible to to reach this target. The findings of this study indicate that, although the students expressed positive perceptions about nursing, this was not matched with a desire to become nurses themselves. Career desirability involves more than reinforcing positive perceptions about nursing. Nursing needs to be made very attractive to young candiates of high calibre in order to improve quality of patient care and promote a more positive profile of nurses and nursing.'' The study reported that the public perceptions of Bahraini people about nursing may be grounded in strong cultural influences. Any efforts to improve the enrolment and retention of Bahraini nurses should consider enhancing the social values of the nursing profession. As a means of enhancing nursing image and perception, the study proposed a best practice model for nursing recruitment that considers the unique culture and contexts of the Arab countries.' The recruitment model Nurse-P.R.A.M is new and is a uniquely Arabic creation, and is focused on recruitment to nursing in the region and in particular Bahrain. The model is built from the unique evidence developed through this study.' Conclusion: In light of the seriousness of the worldwide shortage of nursing shortages, which may have an adverse impact on health systems, recuitment and retention of'qualified nurses must be an increased priority'for all countries of the world.'What is clear is that Western models and approaches to nursing recruitment will not be successful in the Middle East. This study is significant as it will place the perceptions and understanding of Bahraini people and culture and the centre of nursing promotion and recruitment. It will also be a new and insightful addition to the international literature. Some of the issues raised in the study are reflective of the core international literature; however there are fundamental issues particular to the Gulf region, which will require attention in a context of an overall nursing recruitment strategy for Arabic nursing.
Keywords:
culture; arabic; recruitment
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16E12; INRC16E12
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleA Culturally Sensitive Recruitment Model for Arabic Nursingen
dc.title.alternativeDeveloping Community Awareness and Cultural Sensitivityen
dc.contributor.authorCowman, Seamusen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsSeamus Cowman, RGN, RPN, RNT, DipN, FFNMRCSI, FAAN, scowman@rcsi-mub.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616367-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 22, 2016: Background: In response to the shortage of nurses, Bahrain continues to have high dependence on expatriate nurses to maintain the health services. Bahrainization is government policy and'is'strategically aimed at including many more Bahrainis in the workforce. Consistent with Bahrainization the development and expansion of an indigenous nursing profession through increasing the number of Bahrainis working as nurses must be a health service priority. However, in attracting local candidates to study nursing, the public image of nursing in the Middle East continues to be of concern. This study aims to identify the factors that influence the High School Students and their parents in Bahrain to choose the nursing as a future career. The level of understanding and promotion of nursing inside and outside of schools in Bahrain is very unclear and indeed is the extent to which career guidance on nursing occurs. 'This study reports on a research model which tested a recruitment intervention with stakeholders in Bahrain'and based on study findings and seminal work, a unique Arabic nursing recruitment model is presented. The Positive Arabic Recruitment Model NURSE ? P.R.A.M. aims to promote nursing as a career in Bahrain. Methods: A triangulation research design was used incorporating quantitative and qualitative dimensions and an intervention. The study sample included high school students, students? parents, career guidance counselors and nursing students. An nursing recruitment intervention was tested and evaluated in a sample of Bahraini schools with High School students. SPSS was used to analyse quantitative data, while Collaizzi's (1978) methodology and Krueger?s? (1994) Framework were applied to analyse the qualitative data. Findings: At present, in Bahrain ther are 4 nurses per 1,000 of the population compared to the OECD average of 8.7. With the current numbers of students interested in nursing, it will be impossible to to reach this target. The findings of this study indicate that, although the students expressed positive perceptions about nursing, this was not matched with a desire to become nurses themselves. Career desirability involves more than reinforcing positive perceptions about nursing. Nursing needs to be made very attractive to young candiates of high calibre in order to improve quality of patient care and promote a more positive profile of nurses and nursing.'' The study reported that the public perceptions of Bahraini people about nursing may be grounded in strong cultural influences. Any efforts to improve the enrolment and retention of Bahraini nurses should consider enhancing the social values of the nursing profession. As a means of enhancing nursing image and perception, the study proposed a best practice model for nursing recruitment that considers the unique culture and contexts of the Arab countries.' The recruitment model Nurse-P.R.A.M is new and is a uniquely Arabic creation, and is focused on recruitment to nursing in the region and in particular Bahrain. The model is built from the unique evidence developed through this study.' Conclusion: In light of the seriousness of the worldwide shortage of nursing shortages, which may have an adverse impact on health systems, recuitment and retention of'qualified nurses must be an increased priority'for all countries of the world.'What is clear is that Western models and approaches to nursing recruitment will not be successful in the Middle East. This study is significant as it will place the perceptions and understanding of Bahraini people and culture and the centre of nursing promotion and recruitment. It will also be a new and insightful addition to the international literature. Some of the issues raised in the study are reflective of the core international literature; however there are fundamental issues particular to the Gulf region, which will require attention in a context of an overall nursing recruitment strategy for Arabic nursing.en
dc.subjectcultureen
dc.subjectarabicen
dc.subjectrecruitmenten
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:10:57Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:10:57Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.