2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616402
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Grounded Theory to Explain "Different and Better" Nursing Practice
Other Titles:
Grounded Theory in Nursing
Author(s):
Bell, Janet
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Janet Bell, RN, RM, CCRN, NE, jbell@sun.ac.za
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: People sharing stories of their encounters with nurses in critical care environments revealed that a few nurses were perceived to have distinctive qualities that influenced a care encounter in a positive way. The care encounters with these nurses were spoken of as being somehow ?different and better? with these particular nurses described as being able to connect with people in a manner that transcended the combination of knowledge and competence alone. My intention in this study was to explore the nature of ?different and better? nursing practice with people who had engaged with critical care nurses in order to articulate an explanation of how people come to recognise this ?different and better? nursing practice. Methods: Constructivist Grounded Theory methodology was used as the most appropriate way of articulating an explanation of ?different and better? nursing practice. Purposive and theoretical sampling processes resulted in ten participants drawn from patients? significant others, nurses and medical colleagues in critical care environments. Data generation began with participants contributing through in-depth unstructured individual interviews and creating na've sketches. A focused literature review conducted once the categories had formed from the participants? contributions provided a mesh through which the emergent grounded theory became assimilated and situated. The data set was analysed using method processes of concurrent data collection and analysis, with coding through constant comparative analysis. Memo-writing, theoretical sampling, theoretical sensitivity and theoretical saturation were applied to enable the core category to emerge from but remain grounded in the participants? data. Results: An inductively derived explanation was formed and shaped to produce a substantive grounded theory articulating how ?better and different? nursing is recognised from the point of view of those who use the nursing ability of critical care nurses. The core concern ?being at ease? develops through four categories, namely ?knowing self?, ?skilled being?, ?connecting with intention? and ?anchoring?.' Conclusion: ?Being at ease? speaks to a personal feeling of composure and strength that a person develops as a consequence of a trusting partnership created with a nurse; within this space a person feels able to retain their own identity, assert their power and feel in control of their life despite the chaotic or unbearable situation playing out around them. Being at Ease adds to our practice narrative through this explanation of how tacit qualities of ?different and better? nursing are located as discrete elements within the complex nature of specialist clinical practice.
Keywords:
Grounded Theory methodology; different and better nursing practice; critical care
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16K05; INRC16K05
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleUsing Grounded Theory to Explain "Different and Better" Nursing Practiceen
dc.title.alternativeGrounded Theory in Nursingen
dc.contributor.authorBell, Janeten
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsJanet Bell, RN, RM, CCRN, NE, jbell@sun.ac.zaen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616402-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: People sharing stories of their encounters with nurses in critical care environments revealed that a few nurses were perceived to have distinctive qualities that influenced a care encounter in a positive way. The care encounters with these nurses were spoken of as being somehow ?different and better? with these particular nurses described as being able to connect with people in a manner that transcended the combination of knowledge and competence alone. My intention in this study was to explore the nature of ?different and better? nursing practice with people who had engaged with critical care nurses in order to articulate an explanation of how people come to recognise this ?different and better? nursing practice. Methods: Constructivist Grounded Theory methodology was used as the most appropriate way of articulating an explanation of ?different and better? nursing practice. Purposive and theoretical sampling processes resulted in ten participants drawn from patients? significant others, nurses and medical colleagues in critical care environments. Data generation began with participants contributing through in-depth unstructured individual interviews and creating na've sketches. A focused literature review conducted once the categories had formed from the participants? contributions provided a mesh through which the emergent grounded theory became assimilated and situated. The data set was analysed using method processes of concurrent data collection and analysis, with coding through constant comparative analysis. Memo-writing, theoretical sampling, theoretical sensitivity and theoretical saturation were applied to enable the core category to emerge from but remain grounded in the participants? data. Results: An inductively derived explanation was formed and shaped to produce a substantive grounded theory articulating how ?better and different? nursing is recognised from the point of view of those who use the nursing ability of critical care nurses. The core concern ?being at ease? develops through four categories, namely ?knowing self?, ?skilled being?, ?connecting with intention? and ?anchoring?.' Conclusion: ?Being at ease? speaks to a personal feeling of composure and strength that a person develops as a consequence of a trusting partnership created with a nurse; within this space a person feels able to retain their own identity, assert their power and feel in control of their life despite the chaotic or unbearable situation playing out around them. Being at Ease adds to our practice narrative through this explanation of how tacit qualities of ?different and better? nursing are located as discrete elements within the complex nature of specialist clinical practice.en
dc.subjectGrounded Theory methodologyen
dc.subjectdifferent and better nursing practiceen
dc.subjectcritical careen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:11:44Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:11:44Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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