A Phenomenological Study of Work-Family Balance Among Female Deans of Nursing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616416
Title:
A Phenomenological Study of Work-Family Balance Among Female Deans of Nursing
Other Titles:
Work-Place Vs. Work-Family Balance
Author(s):
McErlane, Kimberly S.; Bachand, Jeanie Krause
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Rho Theta
Author Details:
Kimberly S. McErlane, RN, CNS, APRN, mcerlanek1@nku.edu; Jeanie Krause Bachand, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 22, 2016: Purpose: The purpose of this qualitative, interpretive, hermeneutic phenomenological research study was to explore and interpret the lived experiences and shared practices of female nursing deans in baccalaureate nursing programs as it relates to work-family balance.''' Methods: Interpretation of lived experiences (phenomenology) and verbatim texts of life (hermeneutics) from in-depth interviews with participants provided a framework to explore the deans? experiences through the eyes and voices of nursing deans.' After completing a pilot study interview, the snowballing technique was used to recruit 12 baccalaureate nursing deans from Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky for the main study. One-on-one unstructured in-depth telephone interviews were conducted, recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using Van Manen?s (1990) hermeneutic phenomenological method until data saturation was reached.' Several study limitations emerged during data collection.' The results may not be generalizable to the entire population of nursing deans because study participants were recruited from one geographic region, and snowballing technique was used for participant recruitment which may have resulted in recruitment of deans from a social network where the deans were acquaintances.' A limitation that became apparent during data collection was that the numbers and types of programs the deans were responsible for varied.'' Results: Seven themes emerged from the main study data that illuminated the lived experiences of nursing deans.' The themes included (a) feeling stressed, (b) deans cross borders between work and family, (c) sources of support for positive work-family balance, (d) specific experiences that hinder work-family balance, (e) strategies to achieve work-family balance, (f) satisfaction with the deanship position, and (g) participant recommendations for novice deans (McErlane, 2014).' Study results confirmed the deanship role is stressful and the work demands are high. Despite intense job demands, deans derived satisfaction from the deanship role.' Satisfaction was connected with having an ability to shape and manage borders between work and family life.' 'Conclusion: 'Results from this study of nursing deans provided valuable information that can be used to mentor new leaders and create healthy work environments where work-family balance is fostered.''Results of the study could be used as a foundation for future studies of the nursing deanship within a broader global context that includes different geographic locations and cultures.
Keywords:
nursing; deans; work-family balance
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16E05
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleA Phenomenological Study of Work-Family Balance Among Female Deans of Nursingen
dc.title.alternativeWork-Place Vs. Work-Family Balanceen
dc.contributor.authorMcErlane, Kimberly S.en
dc.contributor.authorBachand, Jeanie Krauseen
dc.contributor.departmentRho Thetaen
dc.author.detailsKimberly S. McErlane, RN, CNS, APRN, mcerlanek1@nku.edu; Jeanie Krause Bachand, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616416-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 22, 2016: Purpose: The purpose of this qualitative, interpretive, hermeneutic phenomenological research study was to explore and interpret the lived experiences and shared practices of female nursing deans in baccalaureate nursing programs as it relates to work-family balance.''' Methods: Interpretation of lived experiences (phenomenology) and verbatim texts of life (hermeneutics) from in-depth interviews with participants provided a framework to explore the deans? experiences through the eyes and voices of nursing deans.' After completing a pilot study interview, the snowballing technique was used to recruit 12 baccalaureate nursing deans from Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky for the main study. One-on-one unstructured in-depth telephone interviews were conducted, recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using Van Manen?s (1990) hermeneutic phenomenological method until data saturation was reached.' Several study limitations emerged during data collection.' The results may not be generalizable to the entire population of nursing deans because study participants were recruited from one geographic region, and snowballing technique was used for participant recruitment which may have resulted in recruitment of deans from a social network where the deans were acquaintances.' A limitation that became apparent during data collection was that the numbers and types of programs the deans were responsible for varied.'' Results: Seven themes emerged from the main study data that illuminated the lived experiences of nursing deans.' The themes included (a) feeling stressed, (b) deans cross borders between work and family, (c) sources of support for positive work-family balance, (d) specific experiences that hinder work-family balance, (e) strategies to achieve work-family balance, (f) satisfaction with the deanship position, and (g) participant recommendations for novice deans (McErlane, 2014).' Study results confirmed the deanship role is stressful and the work demands are high. Despite intense job demands, deans derived satisfaction from the deanship role.' Satisfaction was connected with having an ability to shape and manage borders between work and family life.' 'Conclusion: 'Results from this study of nursing deans provided valuable information that can be used to mentor new leaders and create healthy work environments where work-family balance is fostered.''Results of the study could be used as a foundation for future studies of the nursing deanship within a broader global context that includes different geographic locations and cultures.en
dc.subjectnursingen
dc.subjectdeansen
dc.subjectwork-family balanceen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:12:02Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:12:02Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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