Organizational Characteristics and Adverse Patient Outcomes in Provincial Hospital, Thailand

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616434
Title:
Organizational Characteristics and Adverse Patient Outcomes in Provincial Hospital, Thailand
Other Titles:
Evidence-Based Practice Related Outcomes
Author(s):
Abhicharttibutra, Kulwadee
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Phi Omega-at-Large
Author Details:
Kulwadee Abhicharttibutra, RN, akulwadee@gmail.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 22, 2016: The quality of care is an important goal for improving healthcare service. Nurses have significant roles in preventing adverse patient outcomes and improve quality of care. Moreover, nursing practice environment is important for good patient outcomes. This study aimed to examine the relationship between organizational characteristics and adverse patient outcomes in provincial hospitals, Thailand. Populations in this study were patients who were hospitalized and registered nurses who were working at selected units from August to December, 2014. Sample included 155 units and 886 registered nurses. The research instruments included 1) organizational characteristics form including ward type, number of bed, number of nurses and patients, and ocupancy rate. 2) An adverse patient outcome recording form and 2) the Nursing Practice Environment Questionnaire transladed by Nantsupawat (2010). Data was analyzed by using frequency, percentage, mean, standard deviation and spearman Rank Correlation Coefficients. Results revealed that the average of nurse to patient ratio was 8.01 (SD= 2.70), of occupancy rate was 84.72 (SD= 34.84), of practice environment was at a favorable category. The incidents rate per month of fall was .09 (SD=.32), of pressure sore was .94(SD=3.86), of hospital-acquired pneumonia was .23 (SD=.72), of hospital-acquired urinary tract infection was .35 (SD=1.00), of medication error was 5.26 (SD=9.82), of complaint was .08 (SD= .33), and of patient identification error was .08 (SD=.33). Occupancy rate were positively related with pressure sore (Rs = .396, p <.001), hospital-acquired pneumonia (Rs = .261, p<.01), and hospital-acquired urinary tract infection (Rs = .295, p <.001). Nursing practice environment was negatively related to fall (r = -.163, p<.05) and medical error (r = -.204, p<.05). The results of this study can be an information for nurse managers to manage occupancy rate and nursing practice environment in order to prevent the occurrence of adverse patient outcomes and improve quality of care.
Keywords:
Adverse patient outcomes; Organizational Characteristics; Thailand
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16E11
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleOrganizational Characteristics and Adverse Patient Outcomes in Provincial Hospital, Thailanden
dc.title.alternativeEvidence-Based Practice Related Outcomesen
dc.contributor.authorAbhicharttibutra, Kulwadeeen
dc.contributor.departmentPhi Omega-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsKulwadee Abhicharttibutra, RN, akulwadee@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616434-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 22, 2016: The quality of care is an important goal for improving healthcare service. Nurses have significant roles in preventing adverse patient outcomes and improve quality of care. Moreover, nursing practice environment is important for good patient outcomes. This study aimed to examine the relationship between organizational characteristics and adverse patient outcomes in provincial hospitals, Thailand. Populations in this study were patients who were hospitalized and registered nurses who were working at selected units from August to December, 2014. Sample included 155 units and 886 registered nurses. The research instruments included 1) organizational characteristics form including ward type, number of bed, number of nurses and patients, and ocupancy rate. 2) An adverse patient outcome recording form and 2) the Nursing Practice Environment Questionnaire transladed by Nantsupawat (2010). Data was analyzed by using frequency, percentage, mean, standard deviation and spearman Rank Correlation Coefficients. Results revealed that the average of nurse to patient ratio was 8.01 (SD= 2.70), of occupancy rate was 84.72 (SD= 34.84), of practice environment was at a favorable category. The incidents rate per month of fall was .09 (SD=.32), of pressure sore was .94(SD=3.86), of hospital-acquired pneumonia was .23 (SD=.72), of hospital-acquired urinary tract infection was .35 (SD=1.00), of medication error was 5.26 (SD=9.82), of complaint was .08 (SD= .33), and of patient identification error was .08 (SD=.33). Occupancy rate were positively related with pressure sore (Rs = .396, p <.001), hospital-acquired pneumonia (Rs = .261, p<.01), and hospital-acquired urinary tract infection (Rs = .295, p <.001). Nursing practice environment was negatively related to fall (r = -.163, p<.05) and medical error (r = -.204, p<.05). The results of this study can be an information for nurse managers to manage occupancy rate and nursing practice environment in order to prevent the occurrence of adverse patient outcomes and improve quality of care.en
dc.subjectAdverse patient outcomesen
dc.subjectOrganizational Characteristicsen
dc.subjectThailanden
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:12:28Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:12:28Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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