The Effectiveness of Facilitated Web-Mediated Postpartum Depression Education and Postpartum Discharge Instructions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616451
Title:
The Effectiveness of Facilitated Web-Mediated Postpartum Depression Education and Postpartum Discharge Instructions
Other Titles:
Health Promotion During the Maternal and Perinatal Period
Author(s):
Rolle, Yvette
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Phi Pi
Author Details:
Yvette Rolle, RNC-OB, CNE, yrolle@hotmail.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Thursday, July 21, 2016: Postpartum depression is a mental health mood disorder characterized by sadness and despair in patients within twelve months following birth.' At the microsystem level of care prior to the discharge of the postpartum patient, comprehensive education or screening for depressive symptoms is uncommon (Leahy-Warren, McCarthy, & Corcoran, 2012; Marsh, J. (2013).' As a result, patients and relatives do not receive the education required for early depression symptom recognition.' Consequently, depressive signs or symptoms often progressed in the postpartum patient without being identified, reported or treated (Abram & Curran, 2009).' This background information influenced the framing of the following PICOT question: will facilitated web-based postpartum depression'patient and family education in conjunction with the traditional postpartum discharge instructions, promote patients? postpartum depression symptom recognition, use a self-screening depression tool, and increase perceived general self-efficacy when compared to patients who received only the traditional postpartum discharge instructions?' The purpose of the project was to support a practice that facilitated patient and family web-mediated postpartum depression education plus routine postpartum discharge instructions.' Patient self-screening for depressive symptoms was also offered prior to discharge.' The project was implemented on an inpatient postpartum unit at a hospital.' Thirty-five postpartum patients received cell phone web-mediated postpartum depression education plus discharge instructions prior to discharge.' Another group of thirty-five postpartum patients on the same unit only received discharge instructions upon discharge.' Both cohorts were surveyed before and after the interventions.' The general self-efficacy (GSE) assessed decision making and coping skills before and after interventions.' There was no significant difference in GSE scores before and after interventions.' A symptom checklist questionnaire (SCQ) was used to identify recognition of postpartum depressive symptoms.' The group who received both interventions scored higher in postpartum depression symptom recognition.' The Edinburgh Postpartum Depression scale was completed by all patients to screen for early indicators of postpartum depression.' No significant early indicators of postpartum depression was identified during the twenty-four to ninety-six hours postpartum.' Nurses and nursing organization should consider supplemental postpartum depression education utilizing a mobile device for postpartum patients prior to discharge.' Nurses may also become involved in framing policies to address postpartum depression education and screening for depressive symptoms prior to the postpartum patient's discharge.
Keywords:
Postpartum depression; Education; Screening
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16A05
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleThe Effectiveness of Facilitated Web-Mediated Postpartum Depression Education and Postpartum Discharge Instructionsen
dc.title.alternativeHealth Promotion During the Maternal and Perinatal Perioden
dc.contributor.authorRolle, Yvetteen
dc.contributor.departmentPhi Pien
dc.author.detailsYvette Rolle, RNC-OB, CNE, yrolle@hotmail.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616451-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Thursday, July 21, 2016: Postpartum depression is a mental health mood disorder characterized by sadness and despair in patients within twelve months following birth.' At the microsystem level of care prior to the discharge of the postpartum patient, comprehensive education or screening for depressive symptoms is uncommon (Leahy-Warren, McCarthy, & Corcoran, 2012; Marsh, J. (2013).' As a result, patients and relatives do not receive the education required for early depression symptom recognition.' Consequently, depressive signs or symptoms often progressed in the postpartum patient without being identified, reported or treated (Abram & Curran, 2009).' This background information influenced the framing of the following PICOT question: will facilitated web-based postpartum depression'patient and family education in conjunction with the traditional postpartum discharge instructions, promote patients? postpartum depression symptom recognition, use a self-screening depression tool, and increase perceived general self-efficacy when compared to patients who received only the traditional postpartum discharge instructions?' The purpose of the project was to support a practice that facilitated patient and family web-mediated postpartum depression education plus routine postpartum discharge instructions.' Patient self-screening for depressive symptoms was also offered prior to discharge.' The project was implemented on an inpatient postpartum unit at a hospital.' Thirty-five postpartum patients received cell phone web-mediated postpartum depression education plus discharge instructions prior to discharge.' Another group of thirty-five postpartum patients on the same unit only received discharge instructions upon discharge.' Both cohorts were surveyed before and after the interventions.' The general self-efficacy (GSE) assessed decision making and coping skills before and after interventions.' There was no significant difference in GSE scores before and after interventions.' A symptom checklist questionnaire (SCQ) was used to identify recognition of postpartum depressive symptoms.' The group who received both interventions scored higher in postpartum depression symptom recognition.' The Edinburgh Postpartum Depression scale was completed by all patients to screen for early indicators of postpartum depression.' No significant early indicators of postpartum depression was identified during the twenty-four to ninety-six hours postpartum.' Nurses and nursing organization should consider supplemental postpartum depression education utilizing a mobile device for postpartum patients prior to discharge.' Nurses may also become involved in framing policies to address postpartum depression education and screening for depressive symptoms prior to the postpartum patient's discharge.en
dc.subjectPostpartum depressionen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectScreeningen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:12:52Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:12:52Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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