Checking the Pulse of Cultural Competency: A Comparison of PA Magnet and Non-Magnet Facilities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616505
Title:
Checking the Pulse of Cultural Competency: A Comparison of PA Magnet and Non-Magnet Facilities
Other Titles:
The Effects of Magnet Designation
Author(s):
Adeniran, Rita K.; Harmon, Monica J.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Xi
Author Details:
Rita K. Adeniran, RN, CMAC, NEA-BC, FAAN, rita.adeniran@health1stcares.com; Monica J. Harmon, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 24, 2016: Background: 'Cultural competency has the potential to mitigate healthcare disparities and improve outcomes through increased access and full engagement of patients and families in their care. Culturally competent clinicians appreciate the uniqueness of each patient within the context of their illness, communicate respectfully, build trust, and maintain therapeutic relationships that promote optimal health outcomes. Despite recognition of the value of cultural competence, practice varies considerably among healthcare professionals and across healthcare organizations. Factors contributing to variations in the practice of cultural competence are skills, attitudes, and knowledge, the degree of personal desire to practice, differences in the appreciation of the impact on optimizing health outcomes, and the availability and limitations of organizational resources and policies. A systematic assessment of how these factors influence cultural competence practices among nurses across the state of Pennsylvania was conducted using a 40 item survey instrument, the Cultural Competence Education and Awareness Survey (CCEAS).' Analysis of the findings revealed opportunities for enhancing cultural competency in clinical practice of nurses in magnet and non-magnet hospitals. This presentation will focus on describing the demographic composition of PA nurses that participated in CCEAS, outline the strengths and opportunities for enhancing cultural competency in both magnet and non-magnet facilities, and guide appropriate interventions to address gaps and bolster standardized cultural competence practices Purpose: The top purposes of the Cultural Competence Education and Awareness Survey (CCEAS) of Pennsylvania registered nurses are to ascertain the differences in the attitudes, knowledge and behaviors related to the cultural competency of registered nurses in magnet and non-magnet facilities in the state of Pennsylvania. In essence, the survey examined registered nurses? level of desire and interest to provide culturally competent care; the sources and availability of education and training to support cultural competency; and the extent to which cultural competency is being practiced by registered nurses in both magnet and non-magnet facilities. Methods: Registered nurses across the state of Pennsylvania' participated in' the' state-wide Cultural Competence Education and Awareness Survey, a 40 items online survey that collected information on demographics, desire and interest to provide culturally competent care, sources and availability of education, training, and other information that support cultural competent practices, including' the extent to which culturally competent care is currently being provided in healthcare' organizations across the state of Pennsylvania. Independent t-tests were conducted to determine differences between magnet and non-magnet facilities. Level of significance was set at alpha = 0.05. Results: Registered nurses in both magnet and non-magnet facilities expressed a comparable level of desire to provide culturally competent care, including topics and methods' for receiving additional professional development opportunities related to cultural competency. Registered nurses in magnet facilities reported a' significantly higher level of resources, educational preparation and training,' as well as organizational support and infrastructures' to support culturally competent practices. Conclusion: ' Opportunity exists for nurses at all levels of practice and leadership to strengthen their cultural competency skills by heightening their awareness of' patients? cultural' uniqueness within the context of their illness and gaining new awareness and' knowledge for' maintaining' therapeutic relationships that promote optimal health outcomes for diverse patient populations. Healthcare leaders and organizations have a role in helping to standardized the practice of culturally competent care provided by nurses in both magnet and non-magnet facilities.' Further research are necessary to determine if differences exist in the extent to which culturally competent care is currently being provided in magnet and non-magnet organizations.
Keywords:
Nursing Practice; Cultural Competence; Diversity
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16J04
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleChecking the Pulse of Cultural Competency: A Comparison of PA Magnet and Non-Magnet Facilitiesen
dc.title.alternativeThe Effects of Magnet Designationen
dc.contributor.authorAdeniran, Rita K.en
dc.contributor.authorHarmon, Monica J.en
dc.contributor.departmentXien
dc.author.detailsRita K. Adeniran, RN, CMAC, NEA-BC, FAAN, rita.adeniran@health1stcares.com; Monica J. Harmon, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616505-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 24, 2016: Background: 'Cultural competency has the potential to mitigate healthcare disparities and improve outcomes through increased access and full engagement of patients and families in their care. Culturally competent clinicians appreciate the uniqueness of each patient within the context of their illness, communicate respectfully, build trust, and maintain therapeutic relationships that promote optimal health outcomes. Despite recognition of the value of cultural competence, practice varies considerably among healthcare professionals and across healthcare organizations. Factors contributing to variations in the practice of cultural competence are skills, attitudes, and knowledge, the degree of personal desire to practice, differences in the appreciation of the impact on optimizing health outcomes, and the availability and limitations of organizational resources and policies. A systematic assessment of how these factors influence cultural competence practices among nurses across the state of Pennsylvania was conducted using a 40 item survey instrument, the Cultural Competence Education and Awareness Survey (CCEAS).' Analysis of the findings revealed opportunities for enhancing cultural competency in clinical practice of nurses in magnet and non-magnet hospitals. This presentation will focus on describing the demographic composition of PA nurses that participated in CCEAS, outline the strengths and opportunities for enhancing cultural competency in both magnet and non-magnet facilities, and guide appropriate interventions to address gaps and bolster standardized cultural competence practices Purpose: The top purposes of the Cultural Competence Education and Awareness Survey (CCEAS) of Pennsylvania registered nurses are to ascertain the differences in the attitudes, knowledge and behaviors related to the cultural competency of registered nurses in magnet and non-magnet facilities in the state of Pennsylvania. In essence, the survey examined registered nurses? level of desire and interest to provide culturally competent care; the sources and availability of education and training to support cultural competency; and the extent to which cultural competency is being practiced by registered nurses in both magnet and non-magnet facilities. Methods: Registered nurses across the state of Pennsylvania' participated in' the' state-wide Cultural Competence Education and Awareness Survey, a 40 items online survey that collected information on demographics, desire and interest to provide culturally competent care, sources and availability of education, training, and other information that support cultural competent practices, including' the extent to which culturally competent care is currently being provided in healthcare' organizations across the state of Pennsylvania. Independent t-tests were conducted to determine differences between magnet and non-magnet facilities. Level of significance was set at alpha = 0.05. Results: Registered nurses in both magnet and non-magnet facilities expressed a comparable level of desire to provide culturally competent care, including topics and methods' for receiving additional professional development opportunities related to cultural competency. Registered nurses in magnet facilities reported a' significantly higher level of resources, educational preparation and training,' as well as organizational support and infrastructures' to support culturally competent practices. Conclusion: ' Opportunity exists for nurses at all levels of practice and leadership to strengthen their cultural competency skills by heightening their awareness of' patients? cultural' uniqueness within the context of their illness and gaining new awareness and' knowledge for' maintaining' therapeutic relationships that promote optimal health outcomes for diverse patient populations. Healthcare leaders and organizations have a role in helping to standardized the practice of culturally competent care provided by nurses in both magnet and non-magnet facilities.' Further research are necessary to determine if differences exist in the extent to which culturally competent care is currently being provided in magnet and non-magnet organizations.en
dc.subjectNursing Practiceen
dc.subjectCultural Competenceen
dc.subjectDiversityen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:14:09Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:14:09Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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