Attitudes and Behaviors of Caribbean Women and Men Toward Partner Violence and Sexual Relationships

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616509
Title:
Attitudes and Behaviors of Caribbean Women and Men Toward Partner Violence and Sexual Relationships
Other Titles:
Symposium: HIV and Intimate Partner Violence: Risks and Relationships Among Women
Author(s):
Campbell, Doris W.; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Alexander, Kamila A.; Callwood, Gloria B.; Bertrand, Desiree; Sharps, Phyllis; St. Vil, Noelle M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Doris W. Campbell, ARNP, FAAN, dcampbe@uvi.edu; Jacquelyn Campbell, RN; Kamila A. Alexander, RN; Gloria B. Callwood, RN, FAAN; Desiree Bertrand, RN; Phyllis Sharps, RN, FAAN; Noelle M. St. Vil, BA
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, July 25, 2016: Purpose: The United States Virgin Islands (USVI) has the 2nd highest HIV/AIDS incidence rate in the United States and its territories (US Virgin Islands, 2010). Additionally, one-third of USVI women reports physical and/or sexual abuse in their lifetime and experiences of coercive, unprotected sex and other behaviors that increase risks for HIV/AIDS (Draughon JE1, 2015; Stockman JK, 2013; Stockman, 2014). There is scant research that aims to understand USVI women and men?s perceptions of heterosexual relationship dynamics or implications for HIV/AIDS risks and intimate partner violence.'' The purpose of this study was to describe young heterosexual women and men?s attitudes and behaviors toward relationship conflict and sexual activities in the USVI. Methods: 'Qualitative methods using focus group discussions were employed to elicit participants? attitudes and perceptions. Women and men from the US Virgin Islands of St. Thomas and St. Croix were recruited to participate in the groups.' We held one focus group of women on each Island and separate focus groups of men on each Island. The focus group objectives were to elicit information about intimate partner abuse and sexual health risks among men and women in the USVI. 'Interviews were conducted with small groups (4-8) by gender after participants were consented and signed confidentiality pledges. 'We performed directed content analysis of transcripts and uncovered separate themes from both the women and men?s groups. Results: Themes underlying attitudes, perceptions and experiences of partner abuse identified by women emerged and included '1) Female vulnerability and male dominance/control in relationships 2) Perceptions of community silence on topic of partner abuse and stigmatization 3) Lack of community resources and ''4) Resistance to safe sexual practices by abusive partners and increased STI/HIV risks.' Male participants in the focus groups identified themes related to 1) Upholding gender expectations; 2) Fearing loss of control; and 3) Deflecting responsibilities. Male participants described attitudes as underpinnings to subsequent violent responses and sexual behavior decisions. These findings demonstrate the complex ways culturally-framed norms intersect with sexual health behaviors. The USVI is unique due to its position as a U.S. territory infused with the cultural expectations of a Caribbean island. Conclusion: Results from this qualitative research provided the basis for our researchers and practitioners to develop a culturally sensitive intimate partner violence empowerment program for abused African Caribbean women in the USVI. Using concepts of culture and context we adapted intervention materials to the USVI context that have been used successfully with abused women of African American and/or Hispanic origin in mainland USA settings but not yet in the US Virgin Islands. The interventions include a previously developed and tested structured IPV intervention Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation (DOVE),(Bhandari S, 2015) 'and the well validated culturally sensitive Sister-to-Sister skills intervention to reduce sex risk behaviors and prevent new STD infections (Jemmott LS, 2007)
Keywords:
GBV/Partner violence; HIV/AIDS risk violent relationships; Attitude, behaviors GBV
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16P10
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleAttitudes and Behaviors of Caribbean Women and Men Toward Partner Violence and Sexual Relationshipsen
dc.title.alternativeSymposium: HIV and Intimate Partner Violence: Risks and Relationships Among Womenen
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Doris W.en
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Jacquelynen
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Kamila A.en
dc.contributor.authorCallwood, Gloria B.en
dc.contributor.authorBertrand, Desireeen
dc.contributor.authorSharps, Phyllisen
dc.contributor.authorSt. Vil, Noelle M.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsDoris W. Campbell, ARNP, FAAN, dcampbe@uvi.edu; Jacquelyn Campbell, RN; Kamila A. Alexander, RN; Gloria B. Callwood, RN, FAAN; Desiree Bertrand, RN; Phyllis Sharps, RN, FAAN; Noelle M. St. Vil, BAen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616509-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, July 25, 2016: Purpose: The United States Virgin Islands (USVI) has the 2nd highest HIV/AIDS incidence rate in the United States and its territories (US Virgin Islands, 2010). Additionally, one-third of USVI women reports physical and/or sexual abuse in their lifetime and experiences of coercive, unprotected sex and other behaviors that increase risks for HIV/AIDS (Draughon JE1, 2015; Stockman JK, 2013; Stockman, 2014). There is scant research that aims to understand USVI women and men?s perceptions of heterosexual relationship dynamics or implications for HIV/AIDS risks and intimate partner violence.'' The purpose of this study was to describe young heterosexual women and men?s attitudes and behaviors toward relationship conflict and sexual activities in the USVI. Methods: 'Qualitative methods using focus group discussions were employed to elicit participants? attitudes and perceptions. Women and men from the US Virgin Islands of St. Thomas and St. Croix were recruited to participate in the groups.' We held one focus group of women on each Island and separate focus groups of men on each Island. The focus group objectives were to elicit information about intimate partner abuse and sexual health risks among men and women in the USVI. 'Interviews were conducted with small groups (4-8) by gender after participants were consented and signed confidentiality pledges. 'We performed directed content analysis of transcripts and uncovered separate themes from both the women and men?s groups. Results: Themes underlying attitudes, perceptions and experiences of partner abuse identified by women emerged and included '1) Female vulnerability and male dominance/control in relationships 2) Perceptions of community silence on topic of partner abuse and stigmatization 3) Lack of community resources and ''4) Resistance to safe sexual practices by abusive partners and increased STI/HIV risks.' Male participants in the focus groups identified themes related to 1) Upholding gender expectations; 2) Fearing loss of control; and 3) Deflecting responsibilities. Male participants described attitudes as underpinnings to subsequent violent responses and sexual behavior decisions. These findings demonstrate the complex ways culturally-framed norms intersect with sexual health behaviors. The USVI is unique due to its position as a U.S. territory infused with the cultural expectations of a Caribbean island. Conclusion: Results from this qualitative research provided the basis for our researchers and practitioners to develop a culturally sensitive intimate partner violence empowerment program for abused African Caribbean women in the USVI. Using concepts of culture and context we adapted intervention materials to the USVI context that have been used successfully with abused women of African American and/or Hispanic origin in mainland USA settings but not yet in the US Virgin Islands. The interventions include a previously developed and tested structured IPV intervention Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation (DOVE),(Bhandari S, 2015) 'and the well validated culturally sensitive Sister-to-Sister skills intervention to reduce sex risk behaviors and prevent new STD infections (Jemmott LS, 2007)en
dc.subjectGBV/Partner violenceen
dc.subjectHIV/AIDS risk violent relationshipsen
dc.subjectAttitude, behaviors GBVen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:14:14Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:14:14Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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