2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616512
Title:
Cultural Humility in Simulation Education: A State of the Science
Author(s):
Baptiste, Diana-Lyn; Foronda, Cynthia L.; Reinholdt, Maren M.; Velez, Roseann; Hudson, Krysia Warren; Sanchez, Michael; Pfaff, Teresa A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Nu Beta
Author Details:
Diana-Lyn Baptiste, RN, dbaptis1@jhu.edu; Cynthia L. Foronda, RN,'CNE, ANEF; Maren M. Reinholdt, RN; Roseann Velez, CRNP, FNP-BC; Krysia Warren Hudson, RN, BC; Michael Sanchez, CRNP, FNP-BC; Teresa A. Pfaff, RN, APHN-BC, CPH
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 23, 2016 and Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: The National League for Nursing, a voice for nursing education, has identified diversity as a core value. Leading organizations including the Institute of Medicine and American Association of Colleges of Nursing have indicated a need for cultural competency education. To prepare nursing students to aptly care for a multicultural population, education regarding cultural humility is necessary.' Studies have indicated that students of minority backgrounds appreciate integration of race and culture in simulation. However, current international simulation standards lack an emphasis on diversity and cultural humility; thus, simulation curricula may be missing this essential component. The aim of this poster is to provide the state of the science on the presence of cultural humility in simulation education to provide direction for simulation education, research, and policy development. ' Methods: The databases of PubMed, CINAHL, and ERIC, were searched using terms of ?cultural humility? or ?cultural competence? and ?simulation.? One hundred twenty two abstracts were reviewed by two researchers independently to determine relevance. ' Results: 'Fifty-one articles were included in the review. Team members reviewed the literature and achieved consensus on the emerged themes. The results of the integrative review including what is known as well as gaps in knowledge will be presented.' Conclusion: Future directions for research include evaluation of student learning outcomes related to integration of culture in simulation. Simulation facilitators may require training in cultural humility. Culture must be interpreted in the broadest sense and simulation curricula must be examined to assure that students are exposed to a wide variety of cultural contexts. We recommend that cultural humility be added as a Standard to the International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning (INACSL) Standards. Adding cultural humility to the Standards will serve as the impetus to transform simulation curricula globally. Cultural humility must transcend the confines of the classroom and extend to the simulation center to improve student learning, retention, and improve patient care.
Keywords:
Culture; Simulation; literature review
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16PST227
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleCultural Humility in Simulation Education: A State of the Scienceen
dc.contributor.authorBaptiste, Diana-Lynen
dc.contributor.authorForonda, Cynthia L.en
dc.contributor.authorReinholdt, Maren M.en
dc.contributor.authorVelez, Roseannen
dc.contributor.authorHudson, Krysia Warrenen
dc.contributor.authorSanchez, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorPfaff, Teresa A.en
dc.contributor.departmentNu Betaen
dc.author.detailsDiana-Lyn Baptiste, RN, dbaptis1@jhu.edu; Cynthia L. Foronda, RN,'CNE, ANEF; Maren M. Reinholdt, RN; Roseann Velez, CRNP, FNP-BC; Krysia Warren Hudson, RN, BC; Michael Sanchez, CRNP, FNP-BC; Teresa A. Pfaff, RN, APHN-BC, CPHen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616512-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 23, 2016 and Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: The National League for Nursing, a voice for nursing education, has identified diversity as a core value. Leading organizations including the Institute of Medicine and American Association of Colleges of Nursing have indicated a need for cultural competency education. To prepare nursing students to aptly care for a multicultural population, education regarding cultural humility is necessary.' Studies have indicated that students of minority backgrounds appreciate integration of race and culture in simulation. However, current international simulation standards lack an emphasis on diversity and cultural humility; thus, simulation curricula may be missing this essential component. The aim of this poster is to provide the state of the science on the presence of cultural humility in simulation education to provide direction for simulation education, research, and policy development. ' Methods: The databases of PubMed, CINAHL, and ERIC, were searched using terms of ?cultural humility? or ?cultural competence? and ?simulation.? One hundred twenty two abstracts were reviewed by two researchers independently to determine relevance. ' Results: 'Fifty-one articles were included in the review. Team members reviewed the literature and achieved consensus on the emerged themes. The results of the integrative review including what is known as well as gaps in knowledge will be presented.' Conclusion: Future directions for research include evaluation of student learning outcomes related to integration of culture in simulation. Simulation facilitators may require training in cultural humility. Culture must be interpreted in the broadest sense and simulation curricula must be examined to assure that students are exposed to a wide variety of cultural contexts. We recommend that cultural humility be added as a Standard to the International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning (INACSL) Standards. Adding cultural humility to the Standards will serve as the impetus to transform simulation curricula globally. Cultural humility must transcend the confines of the classroom and extend to the simulation center to improve student learning, retention, and improve patient care.en
dc.subjectCultureen
dc.subjectSimulationen
dc.subjectliterature reviewen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:14:19Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:14:19Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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