Instruct APNS to Deliver Bad News to Patients and Families in this Millennial Generation

8.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616524
Title:
Instruct APNS to Deliver Bad News to Patients and Families in this Millennial Generation
Other Titles:
Using Evidence to Improve Simulation in Nursing Education
Author(s):
Mele, Cheryl
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Cheryl Mele, PNP AC/PC-BC NNP-BC, cm3242@drexel.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Thursday, July 21, 2016: A health care professional must acquire abilities as well as a confidence level with this arduous communication responsibility. Formal education in the communication proficiencies required for delivering bad news has established rising attention in the health professional literature. Review of the literature reveals this universal duty is difficult for health care professionals. If delivering bad news is done improperly, it can create ill will among the patient's/family and be detrimental to the grieving process.'Hence, creating a patient-centered environment, which is characterized by mutual respect, understanding, empathy and collaboration is a particular competency established by National Board of' Nurse Practitioners.'The research identifies insufficient preparation, lack of supervisor assistance and scarcity of expertise as obstacles to success. Consequently, nurse educators must develop teaching stratagems for effective communication in the nursing curriculum, which has been identified as an essential advance practice competency. Collaboration and communication aptitude training is a fundamental aspect of all, nurse's ?education programs. However, instruction techniques and outcomes vary extensively and are not consistent (Fisher, et al. 2013).' Many educational programs have been developed to assist healthcare providers or APNs with developing this important skill.'The benefit of simulated technology for health professional education allows the ability to incorporate multiple complex elements into the learning model and supports experiential learning ( Arnold et al., 2013; Swanson, et al., 2011).' Research has found that infusing simulated technology with traditional methods enhances students? motivation and efficiency (Arnold et al., 2013; Swanson, et al., 2011). Educational interventions incorporating simulation technology especially with the use of standardized patients and high fidelity simulation is a feasible teaching strategy to meet the goal of acquiring challenging communication skills (Crawford, et al., 2013; Peterson et al., 2012).' Research has shown that strategic planned simulation training experiences offer the learner an opportunity topractice communication skills with families? in particular highly stressful situations (Fisher et al., 2014; Park, et al., 2010;Peterson et al., 2012). The experience can provide the chance for receiving feedback from a simulated patient's perspective and opportunity for self-reflection (Hammer Fox, & Hampton, 2014).'In addition, evidence has shown'various technological simulation models to role play'delivering bad news in the stressful environments can enhance students' confidence and'aptitude'with real -time clinical practice (Fisher, et al., 2013;Park et al, 2010).'The specific aim of the presentation is how educators can utilize evidence base strategies to prepare APN students to meet the competency of the effective communication such as delivering bad news or relational crisis especially within this milennial generation.
Keywords:
delivering bad news; simulation; communication
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16B10
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleInstruct APNS to Deliver Bad News to Patients and Families in this Millennial Generationen
dc.title.alternativeUsing Evidence to Improve Simulation in Nursing Educationen
dc.contributor.authorMele, Cherylen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsCheryl Mele, PNP AC/PC-BC NNP-BC, cm3242@drexel.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616524-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Thursday, July 21, 2016: A health care professional must acquire abilities as well as a confidence level with this arduous communication responsibility. Formal education in the communication proficiencies required for delivering bad news has established rising attention in the health professional literature. Review of the literature reveals this universal duty is difficult for health care professionals. If delivering bad news is done improperly, it can create ill will among the patient's/family and be detrimental to the grieving process.'Hence, creating a patient-centered environment, which is characterized by mutual respect, understanding, empathy and collaboration is a particular competency established by National Board of' Nurse Practitioners.'The research identifies insufficient preparation, lack of supervisor assistance and scarcity of expertise as obstacles to success. Consequently, nurse educators must develop teaching stratagems for effective communication in the nursing curriculum, which has been identified as an essential advance practice competency. Collaboration and communication aptitude training is a fundamental aspect of all, nurse's ?education programs. However, instruction techniques and outcomes vary extensively and are not consistent (Fisher, et al. 2013).' Many educational programs have been developed to assist healthcare providers or APNs with developing this important skill.'The benefit of simulated technology for health professional education allows the ability to incorporate multiple complex elements into the learning model and supports experiential learning ( Arnold et al., 2013; Swanson, et al., 2011).' Research has found that infusing simulated technology with traditional methods enhances students? motivation and efficiency (Arnold et al., 2013; Swanson, et al., 2011). Educational interventions incorporating simulation technology especially with the use of standardized patients and high fidelity simulation is a feasible teaching strategy to meet the goal of acquiring challenging communication skills (Crawford, et al., 2013; Peterson et al., 2012).' Research has shown that strategic planned simulation training experiences offer the learner an opportunity topractice communication skills with families? in particular highly stressful situations (Fisher et al., 2014; Park, et al., 2010;Peterson et al., 2012). The experience can provide the chance for receiving feedback from a simulated patient's perspective and opportunity for self-reflection (Hammer Fox, & Hampton, 2014).'In addition, evidence has shown'various technological simulation models to role play'delivering bad news in the stressful environments can enhance students' confidence and'aptitude'with real -time clinical practice (Fisher, et al., 2013;Park et al, 2010).'The specific aim of the presentation is how educators can utilize evidence base strategies to prepare APN students to meet the competency of the effective communication such as delivering bad news or relational crisis especially within this milennial generation.en
dc.subjectdelivering bad newsen
dc.subjectsimulationen
dc.subjectcommunicationen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:14:35Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:14:35Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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