Can an Interprofessional ?Virtual Clinic? Teach Culturally Appropriate Interviewing Techniques?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/616543
Title:
Can an Interprofessional ?Virtual Clinic? Teach Culturally Appropriate Interviewing Techniques?
Other Titles:
Teaching With Technology
Author(s):
Palumbo, Mary Val; Beatson, Jean; De Gagne, Jennie Chang; Hart, Vicki
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Mary Val Palumbo, APRN, GNP-BC, mary.palumbo@med.uvm.edu; Jean Beatson, RN; Jennie Chang De Gagne, RN-BC, CNE; Vicki Hart
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, July 25, 2016: Purpose: Nurse educators must embrace opportunities to prepare students for future practice which will be interprofessional, evidence based, and highly technical.' Use of online gaming for education purposes has been shown to be acceptable to students and there has been a call for research to demonstrate more robust outcomes assessment' (Miller & Jensen, 2014). The purpose of this presentation is to discuss innovative ways of teaching interview skills and interprofessional care of a Korean-immigrant elderly with multiple chronic health issues and complex needs.' This presentation will illustrate the use of a virtual clinic when teaching culturally appropriate interviewing techniques for use with eight disciplines and the data available for analysis from this activity.' Utility and limitation of this type of data collection will be discussed.' 'Methods: 'Data generated by the users (n=89) of an online educational game were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Nurse practitioner (NP=11), physical therapy (PT=22), pharmacy (Pharm=17), communication sciences (SLP=16), exercise science (ES=10), and nutrition students (RD=7) were required to participant in the virtual clinic. Medical (MD=3) and social work (SW=3) students volunteered (n=89). 'Eleven video conferences were held for these students to discuss the case of Mrs. Kim, a Korean elder whom they met and interviewed in the virtual clinic.' A post conference survey utilized open-ended questions to provide qualitative data that further described the student experience. 'Results: The 89 student participants conducted and finished 191 interviews in the virtual clinic with a Korean elder with multiple medical problems in preparation for a team video conference. Some students visited the virtual clinic multiple times to prepare for the video conference. There was evidence that three students did not complete the assignment and physical therapy and exercise science had the highest number of users.' The median time spent for all students was 16 minutes (range by discipline: 11.2 to 100.1 minutes).' Median minutes by discipline were: RD (100.1), Pharm (21.2), NP (20.6), EX (18.0), MD (13.8), SLP (13.4), SW(12.4), and PT (11.2).' On average, all students asked 68% of the interview questions correctly. By discipline, the average correct answers to the five sets of interview questions were: RD/SLP (82%), SW (75%) NP/MD (65%), Pharm (63%), and PT/EX (62%).' 'The most frequent reasons for incorrectly asked interview questions was: the use of a closed question (75 times), asking two questions at once (20 times) and culturally inappropriate questions that were too demanding (16 times) or made an assumption (8 times). 'A qualitative analysis found student appreciated practicing interview techniques in a place that was ?free of judgement?.' Some expresses frustrations about the interview questions posed or the pace of speech of the Korean elder; while others appreciated the feedback on open ended questioning and viewing the interviews of other disciplines. 'Conclusion: From the data, it appears that most students spent less than 30 minutes in the interview and did receive feedback on culturally appropriate interviewing technique.' The cultural learning made possible by this virtual clinic included many interview questions and Mrs. Kim?s answers that highlighted the Korean culture that is not common to the study setting. 'With the virtual clinic as a preparation for the interprofessional video conference, the students were able to bring unique information from their interview to share with others. Evaluation data from online educational gaming is plentiful but can be challenging to analyze. ?Gamers? use terms such as sessions, users, visits, time stamps, and total nodes which need to be translated into meaningful evaluation for educators.' This requires patience and communication between game creators and educators. The process might be appropriate for a one time game evaluations rather than after each use by faculty.'
Keywords:
geriatric nursing; interprofessional; online learning
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2016 ; 13-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16O06
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleCan an Interprofessional ?Virtual Clinic? Teach Culturally Appropriate Interviewing Techniques?en
dc.title.alternativeTeaching With Technologyen
dc.contributor.authorPalumbo, Mary Valen
dc.contributor.authorBeatson, Jeanen
dc.contributor.authorDe Gagne, Jennie Changen
dc.contributor.authorHart, Vickien
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsMary Val Palumbo, APRN, GNP-BC, mary.palumbo@med.uvm.edu; Jean Beatson, RN; Jennie Chang De Gagne, RN-BC, CNE; Vicki Harten
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/616543-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, July 25, 2016: Purpose: Nurse educators must embrace opportunities to prepare students for future practice which will be interprofessional, evidence based, and highly technical.' Use of online gaming for education purposes has been shown to be acceptable to students and there has been a call for research to demonstrate more robust outcomes assessment' (Miller & Jensen, 2014). The purpose of this presentation is to discuss innovative ways of teaching interview skills and interprofessional care of a Korean-immigrant elderly with multiple chronic health issues and complex needs.' This presentation will illustrate the use of a virtual clinic when teaching culturally appropriate interviewing techniques for use with eight disciplines and the data available for analysis from this activity.' Utility and limitation of this type of data collection will be discussed.' 'Methods: 'Data generated by the users (n=89) of an online educational game were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Nurse practitioner (NP=11), physical therapy (PT=22), pharmacy (Pharm=17), communication sciences (SLP=16), exercise science (ES=10), and nutrition students (RD=7) were required to participant in the virtual clinic. Medical (MD=3) and social work (SW=3) students volunteered (n=89). 'Eleven video conferences were held for these students to discuss the case of Mrs. Kim, a Korean elder whom they met and interviewed in the virtual clinic.' A post conference survey utilized open-ended questions to provide qualitative data that further described the student experience. 'Results: The 89 student participants conducted and finished 191 interviews in the virtual clinic with a Korean elder with multiple medical problems in preparation for a team video conference. Some students visited the virtual clinic multiple times to prepare for the video conference. There was evidence that three students did not complete the assignment and physical therapy and exercise science had the highest number of users.' The median time spent for all students was 16 minutes (range by discipline: 11.2 to 100.1 minutes).' Median minutes by discipline were: RD (100.1), Pharm (21.2), NP (20.6), EX (18.0), MD (13.8), SLP (13.4), SW(12.4), and PT (11.2).' On average, all students asked 68% of the interview questions correctly. By discipline, the average correct answers to the five sets of interview questions were: RD/SLP (82%), SW (75%) NP/MD (65%), Pharm (63%), and PT/EX (62%).' 'The most frequent reasons for incorrectly asked interview questions was: the use of a closed question (75 times), asking two questions at once (20 times) and culturally inappropriate questions that were too demanding (16 times) or made an assumption (8 times). 'A qualitative analysis found student appreciated practicing interview techniques in a place that was ?free of judgement?.' Some expresses frustrations about the interview questions posed or the pace of speech of the Korean elder; while others appreciated the feedback on open ended questioning and viewing the interviews of other disciplines. 'Conclusion: From the data, it appears that most students spent less than 30 minutes in the interview and did receive feedback on culturally appropriate interviewing technique.' The cultural learning made possible by this virtual clinic included many interview questions and Mrs. Kim?s answers that highlighted the Korean culture that is not common to the study setting. 'With the virtual clinic as a preparation for the interprofessional video conference, the students were able to bring unique information from their interview to share with others. Evaluation data from online educational gaming is plentiful but can be challenging to analyze. ?Gamers? use terms such as sessions, users, visits, time stamps, and total nodes which need to be translated into meaningful evaluation for educators.' This requires patience and communication between game creators and educators. The process might be appropriate for a one time game evaluations rather than after each use by faculty.'en
dc.subjectgeriatric nursingen
dc.subjectinterprofessionalen
dc.subjectonline learningen
dc.date.available2016-07-13T11:15:03Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13-
dc.date.issued2016-07-13en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-13T11:15:03Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
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