Medicinal Cannabis Use and Preferred Mode of Administration: A Patient Survey

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/617223
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Medicinal Cannabis Use and Preferred Mode of Administration: A Patient Survey
Other Titles:
Practice Outcomes in Cancer Care
Author(s):
Phillips, Jane L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Xi Omicron
Author Details:
Jane L. Phillips, RN, jane.phillips@uts.edu.au
Abstract:

Session presented on Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: Consumer interest in medicinal cannabis has promoted the NSW Ministry of Health in Australia to fund various phase II and III medicinal cannabis trials, including a cancer related anorexia and cachexia trial. However, little is known about Australian cancer patients' views towards medicinal cannabis or administration preferences. The purpose of this study was to determine cancer patients' medicinal cannabis preferences for mode of administration, previous and current use, and attitudes and beliefs towards a cancer-related medicinal cannabis anorexia-cachexia trial. Methods: A cross-sectional anonymous patient survey. Patients were eligible if they: 1) had advanced cancer, 2) experienced appetite loss, taste problems or weight loss, and 3) might consider participating in a trial of cannabis for these problems. The survey was administered online and in the waiting rooms of participating adult outpatient oncology and palliative care services. Responses summarized descriptively via frequencies. 'Results: 'Responses were analysed from 109 participants. A third (33%) were aged between 41-60 years of age and half (50%) were male. Preferences for mode of medcinal cannabis administration were: tablets (67%), vaporiser (41%), mouthspray (39%), eating (39%), drinking (34%), topical (28%) and suppositories (8%), with many patients willing to use more than one. The most common reasons for administration preferences were perceived convenience, familiarity, quicker time to effect, lower intrusiveness, more precise dosing and fewer side effects. 'A minority of respondents were worried about adverse effects (5%), legal issues (2%) and/or indicated a need for further information (4%). 'Of 15 patients who had experience of medicinal cannabis, 5 used it for pain, 4 psychological problems, 3 appetite loss and 3 insomnia. Two users said that being asked to stop their usual cannabis use would prevent them from participating in a trial, and one was unsure. 'Comments confirmed strong support for trials of medicinal cannabis and included anecdotal reports of efficacy and perceptions that current evidence is sufficient. Two respondents indicated a belief that cannabis might cure cancer. Conclusion: Comments confirmed strong support for trials of medicinal cannabis and included anecdotal reports of efficacy and perceptions that current evidence is sufficient.

Keywords:
Cancer; Medicinal Cannabis; Anorexia-Cachexia
Repository Posting Date:
19-Jul-2016
Date of Publication:
19-Jul-2016 ; 19-Jul-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC16M07
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
27th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Cape Town, South Africa
Description:
Theme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policy
Note:
Item was accepted for inclusion in the proceedings of the 2016 International Nursing Research Congress in South Africa, but was not presented.; Item was accepted for inclusion in the proceedings of the 2016 International Nursing Research Congress in South Africa, but was not presented.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleMedicinal Cannabis Use and Preferred Mode of Administration: A Patient Surveyen
dc.title.alternativePractice Outcomes in Cancer Careen
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Jane L.en
dc.contributor.departmentXi Omicronen
dc.author.detailsJane L. Phillips, RN, jane.phillips@uts.edu.auen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/617223-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on Sunday, July 24, 2016: Purpose: Consumer interest in medicinal cannabis has promoted the NSW Ministry of Health in Australia to fund various phase II and III medicinal cannabis trials, including a cancer related anorexia and cachexia trial. However, little is known about Australian cancer patients' views towards medicinal cannabis or administration preferences. The purpose of this study was to determine cancer patients' medicinal cannabis preferences for mode of administration, previous and current use, and attitudes and beliefs towards a cancer-related medicinal cannabis anorexia-cachexia trial. Methods: A cross-sectional anonymous patient survey. Patients were eligible if they: 1) had advanced cancer, 2) experienced appetite loss, taste problems or weight loss, and 3) might consider participating in a trial of cannabis for these problems. The survey was administered online and in the waiting rooms of participating adult outpatient oncology and palliative care services. Responses summarized descriptively via frequencies. 'Results: 'Responses were analysed from 109 participants. A third (33%) were aged between 41-60 years of age and half (50%) were male. Preferences for mode of medcinal cannabis administration were: tablets (67%), vaporiser (41%), mouthspray (39%), eating (39%), drinking (34%), topical (28%) and suppositories (8%), with many patients willing to use more than one. The most common reasons for administration preferences were perceived convenience, familiarity, quicker time to effect, lower intrusiveness, more precise dosing and fewer side effects. 'A minority of respondents were worried about adverse effects (5%), legal issues (2%) and/or indicated a need for further information (4%). 'Of 15 patients who had experience of medicinal cannabis, 5 used it for pain, 4 psychological problems, 3 appetite loss and 3 insomnia. Two users said that being asked to stop their usual cannabis use would prevent them from participating in a trial, and one was unsure. 'Comments confirmed strong support for trials of medicinal cannabis and included anecdotal reports of efficacy and perceptions that current evidence is sufficient. Two respondents indicated a belief that cannabis might cure cancer. Conclusion: Comments confirmed strong support for trials of medicinal cannabis and included anecdotal reports of efficacy and perceptions that current evidence is sufficient.</p>en
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subjectMedicinal Cannabisen
dc.subjectAnorexia-Cachexiaen
dc.date.available2016-07-19T18:07:59Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-19-
dc.date.issued2016-07-19en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-19T18:07:59Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name27th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationCape Town, South Africaen
dc.descriptionTheme: Leading Global Research: Advancing Practice, Advocacy, and Policyen
dc.description.noteItem was accepted for inclusion in the proceedings of the 2016 International Nursing Research Congress in South Africa, but was not presented.-
dc.description.noteItem was accepted for inclusion in the proceedings of the 2016 International Nursing Research Congress in South Africa, but was not presented.en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.