2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/618273
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparing Student and Faculty Scores of Clinical Judgment During Simulation
Author(s):
Strickland, Haley; Cheshire, Michelle H.; March, Alice L.
Author Details:
Haley Strickland, EdD, RN, CNL; Michelle H. Cheshire, EdD, RN; Alice L. March, PhD, RN, FNP, CNE
Abstract:
Simulation with high-fidelity technology is an effective teaching strategy that can be utilized to address the continuity of educational experiences of nursing students (San, 2015). Research supports improved critical thinking skills and development of clinical judgment as the benefits of embracing the use of human patient simulation (Jensen, 2013; Lasater, 2011). This study utilized the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric (LCJR) to investigate the relationship between student’s self-assessment of clinical judgment skills and faculty’s assessment of clinical judgment skills during a human patient simulation, acute care, adult medical scenario. The study used a quantitative design with baccalaureate nursing students (n=94) enrolled in an adult health course as participants. The data revealed a positive correlation between evaluator and student scores on the LCJR. These findings support the use of the LCJR in combination with HPS to evaluate nursing students’ clinical judgment skills and to quantify competency levels.
Keywords:
Clinical Simulation; Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric; quantitative research
Repository Posting Date:
11-Aug-2016
Date of Publication:
11-Aug-2016
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning Annual Conference 2016
Conference Host:
International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning
Conference Location:
Grapevine, TX, USA
Description:
Annual Simulation Conference. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Center

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleComparing Student and Faculty Scores of Clinical Judgment During Simulationen
dc.contributor.authorStrickland, Haleyen
dc.contributor.authorCheshire, Michelle H.en
dc.contributor.authorMarch, Alice L.en
dc.author.detailsHaley Strickland, EdD, RN, CNL; Michelle H. Cheshire, EdD, RN; Alice L. March, PhD, RN, FNP, CNEen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/618273-
dc.description.abstractSimulation with high-fidelity technology is an effective teaching strategy that can be utilized to address the continuity of educational experiences of nursing students (San, 2015). Research supports improved critical thinking skills and development of clinical judgment as the benefits of embracing the use of human patient simulation (Jensen, 2013; Lasater, 2011). This study utilized the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric (LCJR) to investigate the relationship between student’s self-assessment of clinical judgment skills and faculty’s assessment of clinical judgment skills during a human patient simulation, acute care, adult medical scenario. The study used a quantitative design with baccalaureate nursing students (n=94) enrolled in an adult health course as participants. The data revealed a positive correlation between evaluator and student scores on the LCJR. These findings support the use of the LCJR in combination with HPS to evaluate nursing students’ clinical judgment skills and to quantify competency levels.en
dc.subjectClinical Simulationen
dc.subjectLasater Clinical Judgment Rubricen
dc.subjectquantitative researchen
dc.date.available2016-08-11T16:05:02Z-
dc.date.issued2016-08-11-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-11T16:05:02Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameInternational Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning Annual Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostInternational Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learningen
dc.conference.locationGrapevine, TX, USAen
dc.descriptionAnnual Simulation Conference. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Centeren
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