2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/618298
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Human Patient Simulation: Bringing the Future into the Classroom
Author(s):
Rode, Jennifer; Barnes, Brenda; Callihan, Mike
Author Details:
Jennifer L. Rode, PhD, MSN, RN; Brenda Barnes, MSN, RN; Mike Callihan, MSN, RN
Abstract:
Evidence supports the contributions of high-fidelity HPS to post-simulation affective, cognitive, and psychomotor learning outcomes (Cant & Cooper, 2010; Lapkin, Levett-Jones, Bellchambers & Fernandez, 2010). Expanding the benefits of HPS experiences to more students and with more experiences would multiply these benefits. However, to justify the full integration of HPS into nurse curriculum, more evidence of knowledge retention is needed. Few studies examine how well information learned in HPS remains 3-6 months following the HPS experience, and existing evidence is limited and inconsistent (Ackermann, 2009; Aqel & Ahmad, 2014; Couto, Farhat, Geis, Olsen & Schvartsman, 2015).Further, a more efficient strategy to deliver HPS to large groups of students is essential to feasibly adapt HPS to dwindling numbers of nurse faculty. One of the biggest challenges in expanding HPS experiences is the time needed to facilitate HPS for large groups of students (Adamson, 2010). New strategies are needed to address this barrier. Using a quasi-experimental design, we developed and tested a large-group HPS experience to minimize time required for HPS experiences by capturing the value of vicarious learning. Our intervention included 8 high-fidelity HPS scenarios embedded into a didactic medical-surgical undergraduate nursing course. We describe our large-group HPS intervention and present tools we used to assist students with the new teaching-learning strategy. Using results from MANCOVA and t-test analyses, we present evidence of knowledge retention, compared to traditional teaching methods; and we examine the effects of this strategy for both active participants and vicarious learners who observe the high-fidelity HPS experience
Keywords:
Clinical Simulation; large group; quantitative research
Repository Posting Date:
11-Aug-2016
Date of Publication:
11-Aug-2016
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning Annual Conference 2016
Conference Host:
International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning
Conference Location:
Grapevine, TX, USA
Description:
Annual Simulation Conference. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Center

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleHuman Patient Simulation: Bringing the Future into the Classroomen
dc.contributor.authorRode, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorBarnes, Brendaen
dc.contributor.authorCallihan, Mikeen
dc.author.detailsJennifer L. Rode, PhD, MSN, RN; Brenda Barnes, MSN, RN; Mike Callihan, MSN, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/618298-
dc.description.abstractEvidence supports the contributions of high-fidelity HPS to post-simulation affective, cognitive, and psychomotor learning outcomes (Cant & Cooper, 2010; Lapkin, Levett-Jones, Bellchambers & Fernandez, 2010). Expanding the benefits of HPS experiences to more students and with more experiences would multiply these benefits. However, to justify the full integration of HPS into nurse curriculum, more evidence of knowledge retention is needed. Few studies examine how well information learned in HPS remains 3-6 months following the HPS experience, and existing evidence is limited and inconsistent (Ackermann, 2009; Aqel & Ahmad, 2014; Couto, Farhat, Geis, Olsen & Schvartsman, 2015).Further, a more efficient strategy to deliver HPS to large groups of students is essential to feasibly adapt HPS to dwindling numbers of nurse faculty. One of the biggest challenges in expanding HPS experiences is the time needed to facilitate HPS for large groups of students (Adamson, 2010). New strategies are needed to address this barrier. Using a quasi-experimental design, we developed and tested a large-group HPS experience to minimize time required for HPS experiences by capturing the value of vicarious learning. Our intervention included 8 high-fidelity HPS scenarios embedded into a didactic medical-surgical undergraduate nursing course. We describe our large-group HPS intervention and present tools we used to assist students with the new teaching-learning strategy. Using results from MANCOVA and t-test analyses, we present evidence of knowledge retention, compared to traditional teaching methods; and we examine the effects of this strategy for both active participants and vicarious learners who observe the high-fidelity HPS experienceen
dc.subjectClinical Simulationen
dc.subjectlarge groupen
dc.subjectquantitative researchen
dc.date.available2016-08-11T16:05:11Z-
dc.date.issued2016-08-11-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-11T16:05:11Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameInternational Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning Annual Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostInternational Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learningen
dc.conference.locationGrapevine, TX, USAen
dc.descriptionAnnual Simulation Conference. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Centeren
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