2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/618302
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Moving Towards Best Simulation Debriefing Practices: The Simulation Debriefing Study
Author(s):
Waznonis, Annette
Author Details:
Annette R. Waznonis, PhD, RN
Abstract:
Background: Best debriefing practices include debriefing by a competent facilitator in a safe environment using a structured framework (Decker et al., 2013). Yet, structured frameworks and evaluation of debriefing are lacking in nursing education (Fey, 2014; Waznonis, 2015). A large-scale mixed methods study was conducted to describe simulation debriefing practices (SDP) of faculty in accredited, traditional, baccalaureate in nursing degree (BSN) programs in the United States. The interview findings from the study are presented to enable the learner to use findings to lessen the gap between current SDP and the best practice standard for debriefing. Method: The study design was qualitative description with an embedded quantitative strand, allowing for the supplemental survey data collection prior to the interviews (Creswell & Clark, 2011). Interview participants were a subset of survey respondents who facilitated debriefing during the 2013 to 2014 academic year. Semi-structured phone interviews were conducted using an interview guide. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and corrected for accuracy. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis (Braun & Clark, 2006). Data were collected until saturation occurred. Findings: Twenty-three faculty members participated in interviews. All participants were full time faculty, with an average of six years of simulation debriefing experience. Three themes emerged with sub-themes: (a) Having the students’ best interest at heart, (b) Getting over the emotional hurdle, and (c) Intentional debriefing evolves into learning. Conclusions: Gaps were found in faculty development, use of a structured framework, and evaluation. Research is warranted on use of video, post-debriefing assignments, co-facilitation, and debriefing effectiveness.
Keywords:
Clinical Simulation; Debriefing; qualitative research
Repository Posting Date:
11-Aug-2016
Date of Publication:
11-Aug-2016
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning Annual Conference 2016
Conference Host:
International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning
Conference Location:
Grapevine, TX, USA
Description:
Annual Simulation Conference. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Center

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleMoving Towards Best Simulation Debriefing Practices: The Simulation Debriefing Studyen
dc.contributor.authorWaznonis, Annetteen
dc.author.detailsAnnette R. Waznonis, PhD, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/618302-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Best debriefing practices include debriefing by a competent facilitator in a safe environment using a structured framework (Decker et al., 2013). Yet, structured frameworks and evaluation of debriefing are lacking in nursing education (Fey, 2014; Waznonis, 2015). A large-scale mixed methods study was conducted to describe simulation debriefing practices (SDP) of faculty in accredited, traditional, baccalaureate in nursing degree (BSN) programs in the United States. The interview findings from the study are presented to enable the learner to use findings to lessen the gap between current SDP and the best practice standard for debriefing. Method: The study design was qualitative description with an embedded quantitative strand, allowing for the supplemental survey data collection prior to the interviews (Creswell & Clark, 2011). Interview participants were a subset of survey respondents who facilitated debriefing during the 2013 to 2014 academic year. Semi-structured phone interviews were conducted using an interview guide. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and corrected for accuracy. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis (Braun & Clark, 2006). Data were collected until saturation occurred. Findings: Twenty-three faculty members participated in interviews. All participants were full time faculty, with an average of six years of simulation debriefing experience. Three themes emerged with sub-themes: (a) Having the students’ best interest at heart, (b) Getting over the emotional hurdle, and (c) Intentional debriefing evolves into learning. Conclusions: Gaps were found in faculty development, use of a structured framework, and evaluation. Research is warranted on use of video, post-debriefing assignments, co-facilitation, and debriefing effectiveness.en
dc.subjectClinical Simulationen
dc.subjectDebriefingen
dc.subjectqualitative researchen
dc.date.available2016-08-11T16:05:18Z-
dc.date.issued2016-08-11-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-11T16:05:18Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameInternational Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning Annual Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostInternational Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learningen
dc.conference.locationGrapevine, TX, USAen
dc.descriptionAnnual Simulation Conference. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Centeren
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