Is Your Organization Ready for Simulation? The Simulation Culture Organizational Readiness Survey (SCORS)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/618306
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Is Your Organization Ready for Simulation? The Simulation Culture Organizational Readiness Survey (SCORS)
Author(s):
Leighton, Kim; Foisy-Doll, Colette R.
Author Details:
Kim Leighton, PhD, RN, ANEF; Colette R. Foisy-Doll, RN BScN MSN CHSE
Abstract:
Despite increased acceptance of simulation as a teaching strategy, widespread reports of organizations that have acquired simulator equipment only to have it remain in unopened boxes, stored in closets, or sit unused continue. There are many theories about why this happens but overall, a failure to ensure organizational readiness to make this commitment is often the root cause. The presenters adapted the Organizational Culture and Readiness for System-wide Integration of Evidence-based Practice Survey (Fineout-Overholt & Melnyk, 2014) and included items from the TeamSTEPPS Readiness Assessment (AHRQ, 2015) to create a survey that examines readiness to integrate simulation-based education. The resulting tool, the Simulation Culture Organizational Readiness Survey (SCORS), was validated by an expert panel of simulation educators and researchers. The SCORS has four sections and a total of 28 items that are answered using a 5-point Likert scale. Scoring guidelines provide a method to help interpret overall score and item scores. A guidebook was developed for users and provides information to help the participant best respond to each item. This presentation is designed to briefly share the development process for the tool, but more importantly, to help the audience understand why it is vital to address organizational readiness prior to instituting a major curricular change such as integrating simulation, as well as the necessity of addressing logistical challenges before the change is implemented. With thoughtful consideration of organizational culture, readiness for change, and ability to support change, organizations may be more successful when integrating simulation-based learning into their programs.
Keywords:
Clinical Simulation; TeamSTEPPS Readiness; tool development
Repository Posting Date:
11-Aug-2016
Date of Publication:
11-Aug-2016
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning Annual Conference 2016
Conference Host:
International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning
Conference Location:
Grapevine, TX, USA
Description:
Annual Simulation Conference. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Center

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleIs Your Organization Ready for Simulation? The Simulation Culture Organizational Readiness Survey (SCORS)en
dc.contributor.authorLeighton, Kimen
dc.contributor.authorFoisy-Doll, Colette R.en
dc.author.detailsKim Leighton, PhD, RN, ANEF; Colette R. Foisy-Doll, RN BScN MSN CHSEen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/618306-
dc.description.abstractDespite increased acceptance of simulation as a teaching strategy, widespread reports of organizations that have acquired simulator equipment only to have it remain in unopened boxes, stored in closets, or sit unused continue. There are many theories about why this happens but overall, a failure to ensure organizational readiness to make this commitment is often the root cause. The presenters adapted the Organizational Culture and Readiness for System-wide Integration of Evidence-based Practice Survey (Fineout-Overholt & Melnyk, 2014) and included items from the TeamSTEPPS Readiness Assessment (AHRQ, 2015) to create a survey that examines readiness to integrate simulation-based education. The resulting tool, the Simulation Culture Organizational Readiness Survey (SCORS), was validated by an expert panel of simulation educators and researchers. The SCORS has four sections and a total of 28 items that are answered using a 5-point Likert scale. Scoring guidelines provide a method to help interpret overall score and item scores. A guidebook was developed for users and provides information to help the participant best respond to each item. This presentation is designed to briefly share the development process for the tool, but more importantly, to help the audience understand why it is vital to address organizational readiness prior to instituting a major curricular change such as integrating simulation, as well as the necessity of addressing logistical challenges before the change is implemented. With thoughtful consideration of organizational culture, readiness for change, and ability to support change, organizations may be more successful when integrating simulation-based learning into their programs.en
dc.subjectClinical Simulationen
dc.subjectTeamSTEPPS Readinessen
dc.subjecttool developmenten
dc.date.available2016-08-11T16:05:24Z-
dc.date.issued2016-08-11-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-11T16:05:24Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameInternational Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning Annual Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostInternational Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learningen
dc.conference.locationGrapevine, TX, USAen
dc.descriptionAnnual Simulation Conference. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Centeren
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.