How Nursing Students Learn to Care for Deteriorating Patients in Debriefing: A Mixed-methods Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/618321
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How Nursing Students Learn to Care for Deteriorating Patients in Debriefing: A Mixed-methods Study
Author(s):
Lavoie, Patrick; Cossette, Sylvie; Pepin, Jacinthe
Author Details:
Patrick Lavoie, RN, MSc, PhD (c); Sylvie Cossette, RN, PhD; Jacinthe Pepin, RN, PhD
Abstract:
Previous studies on debriefing have addressed components such as video assistance, duration, content, or educator presence and characteristics (Cheng et al., 2014). However, studies of how nursing students learn in debriefing remain scarce, even if Cook and al. (2008) recommended that educational research addresses processes underpinning learning outcomes. In the first phase of a mixed-methods study, students (n=117) participated in a randomized controlled trial comparing the effect of two debriefing methods after patient deterioration simulations: a reflective debriefing for clinical judgment (REsPoND; Lavoie, Pepin, & Cossette, 2015) or the Plus-delta debriefing technique (Fanning & Gaba, 2007). REsPoND consists in a reflective analysis of a patient deterioration simulation experience through a list of questions designed after Tanner’s (2006) model of clinical judgment and Dewey’s (1907) conception of reflection. Based on the results of the RCT, we interviewed nineteen nursing students who experienced REsPoND to study their perception of how they learned in this debriefing. Thematic analysis of the transcripts revealed that students’ perceived that they learned through a process of describing and analyzing a situation to build a framework of how they should have responded to the simulated patient deterioration situation. Then, they compare their performance to that framework in order to target good behaviors and those that need improvement. The characteristics and interactions of the debriefer and the students (as a group) appear as influential on this process. Variations in students’ perceptions of this process according to their results in the RCT will be presented and discussed.
Keywords:
Clinical Simulation; Debriefing; quantitative research
Repository Posting Date:
11-Aug-2016
Date of Publication:
11-Aug-2016
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning Annual Conference 2016
Conference Host:
International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning
Conference Location:
Grapevine, TX, USA
Description:
Annual Simulation Conference. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Center

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleHow Nursing Students Learn to Care for Deteriorating Patients in Debriefing: A Mixed-methods Studyen
dc.contributor.authorLavoie, Patricken
dc.contributor.authorCossette, Sylvieen
dc.contributor.authorPepin, Jacintheen
dc.author.detailsPatrick Lavoie, RN, MSc, PhD (c); Sylvie Cossette, RN, PhD; Jacinthe Pepin, RN, PhDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/618321-
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies on debriefing have addressed components such as video assistance, duration, content, or educator presence and characteristics (Cheng et al., 2014). However, studies of how nursing students learn in debriefing remain scarce, even if Cook and al. (2008) recommended that educational research addresses processes underpinning learning outcomes. In the first phase of a mixed-methods study, students (n=117) participated in a randomized controlled trial comparing the effect of two debriefing methods after patient deterioration simulations: a reflective debriefing for clinical judgment (REsPoND; Lavoie, Pepin, & Cossette, 2015) or the Plus-delta debriefing technique (Fanning & Gaba, 2007). REsPoND consists in a reflective analysis of a patient deterioration simulation experience through a list of questions designed after Tanner’s (2006) model of clinical judgment and Dewey’s (1907) conception of reflection. Based on the results of the RCT, we interviewed nineteen nursing students who experienced REsPoND to study their perception of how they learned in this debriefing. Thematic analysis of the transcripts revealed that students’ perceived that they learned through a process of describing and analyzing a situation to build a framework of how they should have responded to the simulated patient deterioration situation. Then, they compare their performance to that framework in order to target good behaviors and those that need improvement. The characteristics and interactions of the debriefer and the students (as a group) appear as influential on this process. Variations in students’ perceptions of this process according to their results in the RCT will be presented and discussed.en
dc.subjectClinical Simulationen
dc.subjectDebriefingen
dc.subjectquantitative researchen
dc.date.available2016-08-11T16:05:47Z-
dc.date.issued2016-08-11-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-11T16:05:47Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameInternational Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning Annual Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostInternational Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learningen
dc.conference.locationGrapevine, TX, USAen
dc.descriptionAnnual Simulation Conference. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Centeren
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