Effectiveness of Standardized Patient Simulation Scenarios & Electronic Health Record Documentation to Improve the Clinical Competence of Graduate Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/618322
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effectiveness of Standardized Patient Simulation Scenarios & Electronic Health Record Documentation to Improve the Clinical Competence of Graduate Nurses
Author(s):
von Reyn, Rosanne; Ellis, Kathleen; Halverson, Lori; Smith, Nancy; Sutton, Tamera
Author Details:
Rosanne von Reyn, MS, BSN, RN-BC; Kathleen Ellis, PhD, RN; Lori Halverson, BSN, RN; Nancy Smith, MS, RN, OCN; Tamera Sutton, MSN, RN, RN-BC
Abstract:
Increased acuity of hospitalized patients, technology, and complexity of healthcare systems pose a unique challenge in the orientation of graduate nurses (GNs) to their role1. By themselves, traditional graduate nurse orientation programs do not provide adequate preparation for the transition from nursing school to professional practice2. In order to provide more realistic, low risk opportunities for students, many undergraduate nursing programs rely on increased use of simulation. Research has demonstrated that simulation experiences provide end-of-program outcomes comparable with experiences gained in traditional clinical hours3. The collaboration between nursing schools and hospitals add value and efficiency to the transition process2. Our hospital has worked with a local university to create a structure for simulated education in the hospital setting. The purpose of this mixed methods two group repeated measures quasi-experimental study was to evaluate the effects of simulation on the transition of two groups of new graduate nurses. Cohort 1 experienced the usual transition program with an individual simulation experience after the completion of their internship. Cohort 2 participated in two group simulation exercises during their internship. They are scheduled in December 2015 to complete the same individual simulation experience as the first group. Both groups included an EHR component which is novel for simulation research. Preliminary results showed that nurses in the intervention group demonstrated increased attention to hygiene and safety issues. Nurse comments in debriefing indicated an increase in comfort with using the EHR documentation during the simulation. Researchers noted which nurses acted as leaders and which were spectators.
Keywords:
Clinical Simulation; new graduate tranistion; quantitative research
Repository Posting Date:
11-Aug-2016
Date of Publication:
11-Aug-2016
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning Annual Conference 2016
Conference Host:
International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning
Conference Location:
Grapevine, TX, USA
Description:
Annual Simulation Conference. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Center

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleEffectiveness of Standardized Patient Simulation Scenarios & Electronic Health Record Documentation to Improve the Clinical Competence of Graduate Nursesen
dc.contributor.authorvon Reyn, Rosanneen
dc.contributor.authorEllis, Kathleenen
dc.contributor.authorHalverson, Lorien
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Nancyen
dc.contributor.authorSutton, Tameraen
dc.author.detailsRosanne von Reyn, MS, BSN, RN-BC; Kathleen Ellis, PhD, RN; Lori Halverson, BSN, RN; Nancy Smith, MS, RN, OCN; Tamera Sutton, MSN, RN, RN-BCen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/618322-
dc.description.abstractIncreased acuity of hospitalized patients, technology, and complexity of healthcare systems pose a unique challenge in the orientation of graduate nurses (GNs) to their role1. By themselves, traditional graduate nurse orientation programs do not provide adequate preparation for the transition from nursing school to professional practice2. In order to provide more realistic, low risk opportunities for students, many undergraduate nursing programs rely on increased use of simulation. Research has demonstrated that simulation experiences provide end-of-program outcomes comparable with experiences gained in traditional clinical hours3. The collaboration between nursing schools and hospitals add value and efficiency to the transition process2. Our hospital has worked with a local university to create a structure for simulated education in the hospital setting. The purpose of this mixed methods two group repeated measures quasi-experimental study was to evaluate the effects of simulation on the transition of two groups of new graduate nurses. Cohort 1 experienced the usual transition program with an individual simulation experience after the completion of their internship. Cohort 2 participated in two group simulation exercises during their internship. They are scheduled in December 2015 to complete the same individual simulation experience as the first group. Both groups included an EHR component which is novel for simulation research. Preliminary results showed that nurses in the intervention group demonstrated increased attention to hygiene and safety issues. Nurse comments in debriefing indicated an increase in comfort with using the EHR documentation during the simulation. Researchers noted which nurses acted as leaders and which were spectators.en
dc.subjectClinical Simulationen
dc.subjectnew graduate tranistionen
dc.subjectquantitative researchen
dc.date.available2016-08-11T16:05:48Z-
dc.date.issued2016-08-11-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-11T16:05:48Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameInternational Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning Annual Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostInternational Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learningen
dc.conference.locationGrapevine, TX, USAen
dc.descriptionAnnual Simulation Conference. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Centeren
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