2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/618324
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Medication Safety Through Simulation
Author(s):
Mariani, Bette; Paparella, Susan F.; Ross, Jennifer Gunberg
Author Details:
Bette Mariani, PhD, RN; Susan F. Paparella, MSN, RN; Jennifer Gunberg Ross, PhD, RN, CNE
Abstract:
Background: Medication administration is an important part of the nurse’s role. Student nurses and new graduates often lack knowledge and competency to safely administer medications. Simulation can facilitate student learning about medication safety. Purpose: This simulation intervention study tested the differences in knowledge, competency, and perceptions of medication safety between students who did and did not participate in safety enhanced medication administration simulations. Method: This was a two-group pretest-posttest design. Participants completed the Medication Knowledge Safety Assessment (MSKA) and the Healthcare Professionals Patient Safety Assessment (HPPSA) pretests at the start of the semester. The control group participated in the usual simulations/debriefings; the intervention group participated in one additional medication administration simulation, and a medication safety enhanced simulation. During the final simulation of the semester, participants’ competency in medication administration/safety was rated using the Medication Safety Critical Element Checklist (MSCEC). All participants completed the MSKA and HPPSA posttests. Results: Data for the MSKA were analyzed using a Knowledge Pass/Fail cut score of 21 correct answers or more to pass. The HPPSA scores were analyzed using paired t-tests and MSCEC between groups scores were compared. Pearson correlations were performed to determine the relationship between the MKSA, MSCEC, and HPPSA scores for the intervention and control groups. Study results will be reported. Conclusions/Implications: Medication safety is essential to ensuring patient safety; it is important to ensure that new graduates are well-prepared to provide safe care. Outcomes of this study support the evidence that simulation is an effective strategy to improve student learning.
Keywords:
Clinical Simulation; medication adminstration; quantitative research
Repository Posting Date:
11-Aug-2016
Date of Publication:
11-Aug-2016
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning Annual Conference 2016
Conference Host:
International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning
Conference Location:
Grapevine, TX, USA
Description:
Annual Simulation Conference. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Center

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleImproving Medication Safety Through Simulationen
dc.contributor.authorMariani, Betteen
dc.contributor.authorPaparella, Susan F.en
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Jennifer Gunbergen
dc.author.detailsBette Mariani, PhD, RN; Susan F. Paparella, MSN, RN; Jennifer Gunberg Ross, PhD, RN, CNEen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/618324-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Medication administration is an important part of the nurse’s role. Student nurses and new graduates often lack knowledge and competency to safely administer medications. Simulation can facilitate student learning about medication safety. Purpose: This simulation intervention study tested the differences in knowledge, competency, and perceptions of medication safety between students who did and did not participate in safety enhanced medication administration simulations. Method: This was a two-group pretest-posttest design. Participants completed the Medication Knowledge Safety Assessment (MSKA) and the Healthcare Professionals Patient Safety Assessment (HPPSA) pretests at the start of the semester. The control group participated in the usual simulations/debriefings; the intervention group participated in one additional medication administration simulation, and a medication safety enhanced simulation. During the final simulation of the semester, participants’ competency in medication administration/safety was rated using the Medication Safety Critical Element Checklist (MSCEC). All participants completed the MSKA and HPPSA posttests. Results: Data for the MSKA were analyzed using a Knowledge Pass/Fail cut score of 21 correct answers or more to pass. The HPPSA scores were analyzed using paired t-tests and MSCEC between groups scores were compared. Pearson correlations were performed to determine the relationship between the MKSA, MSCEC, and HPPSA scores for the intervention and control groups. Study results will be reported. Conclusions/Implications: Medication safety is essential to ensuring patient safety; it is important to ensure that new graduates are well-prepared to provide safe care. Outcomes of this study support the evidence that simulation is an effective strategy to improve student learning.en
dc.subjectClinical Simulationen
dc.subjectmedication adminstrationen
dc.subjectquantitative researchen
dc.date.available2016-08-11T16:05:51Z-
dc.date.issued2016-08-11-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-11T16:05:51Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameInternational Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning Annual Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostInternational Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learningen
dc.conference.locationGrapevine, TX, USAen
dc.descriptionAnnual Simulation Conference. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Centeren
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.