7.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/618336
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Just in Time Training: Utilizing Simulation for Nursing Staff Development
Author(s):
Robilotto, Tracey; Arcaro, Lygia L.
Author Details:
Tracey Robilotto, MSN Ed, APRN, ACNS-BC; Lygia L. Arcaro, PhD, RN-BC
Abstract:
Competency and competence are frequently used interchangeable. There have been extensive debates on how to define and how to measure both. Wright (2007) states that nurses do not lose skills with disuse and relates them to riding a bicycle; while other researchers have found that skills can deteriorate in a matter of weeks without practice (Conlan, Grabowski, & Smith, 2012). Most nurses who have not used certain skills for a period of time would most certainly agree with the latter. Providing the needed patient care opportunities for consistent hands-on care practice to maintain skills can be quite challenging. Simulation is a proven tool for prelicensure nursing education; in 2015 the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) published a research study stating that up to 50% of nursing student clinical experience could be substituted with simulation without effect on state board performance or beside competency (Hayden, et al, 2015). While simulation has been used extensively in anesthesia, medicine, nursing schools, and with new graduate nurse education its use in nursing staff development has been slow. Some barriers for simulation utilization in staff development include educator buy-in, knowledge of simulator use, cost, and staff burden with time away at a simulation center (Abel & Keaster, 2012). This course will provide educators with a template to utilize simulation in staff development to fill patient care gaps, increase practice time, and improve nurse confidence without removing staff from the clinical area and without taking them away from patient care for extended periods.
Keywords:
Clinical Simulation; staff development; barriers
Repository Posting Date:
11-Aug-2016
Date of Publication:
11-Aug-2016
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning Annual Conference 2016
Conference Host:
International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning
Conference Location:
Grapevine, TX, USA
Description:
Annual Simulation Conference. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Center

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleJust in Time Training: Utilizing Simulation for Nursing Staff Developmenten
dc.contributor.authorRobilotto, Traceyen
dc.contributor.authorArcaro, Lygia L.en
dc.author.detailsTracey Robilotto, MSN Ed, APRN, ACNS-BC; Lygia L. Arcaro, PhD, RN-BCen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/618336-
dc.description.abstractCompetency and competence are frequently used interchangeable. There have been extensive debates on how to define and how to measure both. Wright (2007) states that nurses do not lose skills with disuse and relates them to riding a bicycle; while other researchers have found that skills can deteriorate in a matter of weeks without practice (Conlan, Grabowski, & Smith, 2012). Most nurses who have not used certain skills for a period of time would most certainly agree with the latter. Providing the needed patient care opportunities for consistent hands-on care practice to maintain skills can be quite challenging. Simulation is a proven tool for prelicensure nursing education; in 2015 the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) published a research study stating that up to 50% of nursing student clinical experience could be substituted with simulation without effect on state board performance or beside competency (Hayden, et al, 2015). While simulation has been used extensively in anesthesia, medicine, nursing schools, and with new graduate nurse education its use in nursing staff development has been slow. Some barriers for simulation utilization in staff development include educator buy-in, knowledge of simulator use, cost, and staff burden with time away at a simulation center (Abel & Keaster, 2012). This course will provide educators with a template to utilize simulation in staff development to fill patient care gaps, increase practice time, and improve nurse confidence without removing staff from the clinical area and without taking them away from patient care for extended periods.en
dc.subjectClinical Simulationen
dc.subjectstaff developmenten
dc.subjectbarriersen
dc.date.available2016-08-11T16:06:07Z-
dc.date.issued2016-08-11-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-11T16:06:07Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameInternational Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning Annual Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostInternational Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learningen
dc.conference.locationGrapevine, TX, USAen
dc.descriptionAnnual Simulation Conference. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Centeren
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