2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/618339
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of a High-Fidelity End-of-Life Simulation on Nursing Students’ Death Anxiety
Author(s):
Dubert, Christy; Gee, Rose Mary; Upchurch, Linda
Author Details:
Christy J. Dubert, PhD, RN; Rose Mary Gee, PhD, RN; Linda Upchurch, DNP, ANP-BC
Abstract:
Background: Many nursing students report feeling high anxiety about providing End-of-Life (EOL) nursing care (Hamilton, 2010). Traditional teaching formats are not best suited to provide students opportunities to reflect on their feelings and concerns (Gillan et al., 2014). New educational approaches are necessary to promote experiential learning and reflection (Benner et al., 2009). Purpose: This quasi-experimental study examined the effect of an EOL simulation on nursing students’ death anxiety and concerns about death and dying prior to attending a hospice clinical. Methods: The Concerns about Dying (CAD) instrument was administered to two undergraduate nursing class cohorts (n = 86). A 2x2 factorial mixed-model ANOVA [(semester: Fall, Spring) x (Treatment: Simulation, Hospice)] was conducted to assess the effects of semester and treatment on students’ CAD scores. Results: Neither the semester x treatment type interaction nor the main effect for semester reached statistical significance. However, the CAD mean scores for the fall cohort significantly decreased from pre- to post-simulation and from post-simulation to after hospice, with a large effect. The CAD mean scores for the spring cohort did not significant decrease between pre- and post-simulation; however, there was a significant decrease in CAD score between post-simulation and after hospice, with a large effect. Conclusion: Overall, the students’ reported less anxiety about caring for dying patients after the EOL simulation and a further decline in their death anxiety after the hospice experience. The students’ decreased death anxiety trend is encouraging and an EOL simulation should be considered to decrease nursing students’ death anxiety.
Keywords:
Clinical Simulation; End of life care; quantitative research
Repository Posting Date:
11-Aug-2016
Date of Publication:
11-Aug-2016
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning Annual Conference 2016
Conference Host:
International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning
Conference Location:
Grapevine, TX, USA
Description:
Annual Simulation Conference. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Center

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleEffect of a High-Fidelity End-of-Life Simulation on Nursing Students’ Death Anxietyen
dc.contributor.authorDubert, Christyen
dc.contributor.authorGee, Rose Maryen
dc.contributor.authorUpchurch, Lindaen
dc.author.detailsChristy J. Dubert, PhD, RN; Rose Mary Gee, PhD, RN; Linda Upchurch, DNP, ANP-BCen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/618339-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Many nursing students report feeling high anxiety about providing End-of-Life (EOL) nursing care (Hamilton, 2010). Traditional teaching formats are not best suited to provide students opportunities to reflect on their feelings and concerns (Gillan et al., 2014). New educational approaches are necessary to promote experiential learning and reflection (Benner et al., 2009). Purpose: This quasi-experimental study examined the effect of an EOL simulation on nursing students’ death anxiety and concerns about death and dying prior to attending a hospice clinical. Methods: The Concerns about Dying (CAD) instrument was administered to two undergraduate nursing class cohorts (n = 86). A 2x2 factorial mixed-model ANOVA [(semester: Fall, Spring) x (Treatment: Simulation, Hospice)] was conducted to assess the effects of semester and treatment on students’ CAD scores. Results: Neither the semester x treatment type interaction nor the main effect for semester reached statistical significance. However, the CAD mean scores for the fall cohort significantly decreased from pre- to post-simulation and from post-simulation to after hospice, with a large effect. The CAD mean scores for the spring cohort did not significant decrease between pre- and post-simulation; however, there was a significant decrease in CAD score between post-simulation and after hospice, with a large effect. Conclusion: Overall, the students’ reported less anxiety about caring for dying patients after the EOL simulation and a further decline in their death anxiety after the hospice experience. The students’ decreased death anxiety trend is encouraging and an EOL simulation should be considered to decrease nursing students’ death anxiety.en
dc.subjectClinical Simulationen
dc.subjectEnd of life careen
dc.subjectquantitative researchen
dc.date.available2016-08-11T16:06:13Z-
dc.date.issued2016-08-11-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-11T16:06:13Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameInternational Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning Annual Conference 2016en
dc.conference.hostInternational Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learningen
dc.conference.locationGrapevine, TX, USAen
dc.descriptionAnnual Simulation Conference. Held at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Centeren
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