2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620200
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Multi-Dimensional Culture of Mentoring for Nurse Proteges
Other Titles:
Successful Strategies in Mentoring Nurse Leaders
Author(s):
Young, Myrna; Mickiewicz, Ashley R.; Andrews, Patricia
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Myrna Young, RN, CCRN, myrna.young@rwjuh.edu; Ashley R. Mickiewicz, RN, OCN; Patricia Andrews, RN, OCN
Abstract:
Session presented on Tuesday, September 20, 2016: Significance and Background Engaging nurses from the first day of hire is possible when a culture of mentoring is provided. Effective mentorships provide an environment in which a new graduate nurse can be empowered to implement best practices, collaborate interprofessionally, participate with dissemination of nursing research, all while driving for quality health care delivery. Mentoring provides the framework to allow for the new nurse to provide exemplary work practices that improve patient and nursing outcomes. Purpose Empowering mentorships for new nurses creates future success. With a diverse leadership approach that is relational, collaborative and transparent a culture of mentoring is evidenced in the environment. Effective mentoring leads to increased retention and success of new nurses. Interventions Leadership mentors for new nurses consist of the unit director, unit clinical nurse educator and central education educator. The three work together in consistent collaboration assessing the strengths of each new nurse, and tailoring the mentorship to pave the way for attainment of career goals. While the formal mentorship roles are identified with job title there is an informal mentorship that develops as professional relationships are established. The unit director and educator focus on specialty growth while the central education educator focuses on career and educational goals. Individual strengths are identified and mentorships are tailored to meet the prot�g�s desires. The institution provides and environment to make mentorship attainable. Structured programs are available for specialty growth: core education, in-services, and certification courses. Programs such as the RN Residency are highly supported; substantial amount of tuition reimbursement is available. Evaluation The unit has 40 registered nurses, with 10 new graduate nurses in two years. Professional Advancement System (PAS) participation has increased by 50%. Participation of new nurses on the PAS by is 100%, RN Residency Participation is 80%, and enrollment into an advanced degree program is at 50% within one year of hire. Discussion Developing a culture of mentorship is key to success of the new graduate nurse. Having a diverse team to assist in mentoring provides the greatest benefits to the new nurse. Collaboration between mentors provides the environment that allows for the professional growth of the new nurse.
Keywords:
mentor; learning environment; novice nurse
Repository Posting Date:
16-Sep-2016
Date of Publication:
16-Sep-2016
Other Identifiers:
LEAD16Q02
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Leadership Connection 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleMulti-Dimensional Culture of Mentoring for Nurse Protegesen
dc.title.alternativeSuccessful Strategies in Mentoring Nurse Leadersen
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Myrnaen
dc.contributor.authorMickiewicz, Ashley R.en
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Patriciaen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsMyrna Young, RN, CCRN, myrna.young@rwjuh.edu; Ashley R. Mickiewicz, RN, OCN; Patricia Andrews, RN, OCNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620200-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Tuesday, September 20, 2016: Significance and Background Engaging nurses from the first day of hire is possible when a culture of mentoring is provided. Effective mentorships provide an environment in which a new graduate nurse can be empowered to implement best practices, collaborate interprofessionally, participate with dissemination of nursing research, all while driving for quality health care delivery. Mentoring provides the framework to allow for the new nurse to provide exemplary work practices that improve patient and nursing outcomes. Purpose Empowering mentorships for new nurses creates future success. With a diverse leadership approach that is relational, collaborative and transparent a culture of mentoring is evidenced in the environment. Effective mentoring leads to increased retention and success of new nurses. Interventions Leadership mentors for new nurses consist of the unit director, unit clinical nurse educator and central education educator. The three work together in consistent collaboration assessing the strengths of each new nurse, and tailoring the mentorship to pave the way for attainment of career goals. While the formal mentorship roles are identified with job title there is an informal mentorship that develops as professional relationships are established. The unit director and educator focus on specialty growth while the central education educator focuses on career and educational goals. Individual strengths are identified and mentorships are tailored to meet the prot�g�s desires. The institution provides and environment to make mentorship attainable. Structured programs are available for specialty growth: core education, in-services, and certification courses. Programs such as the RN Residency are highly supported; substantial amount of tuition reimbursement is available. Evaluation The unit has 40 registered nurses, with 10 new graduate nurses in two years. Professional Advancement System (PAS) participation has increased by 50%. Participation of new nurses on the PAS by is 100%, RN Residency Participation is 80%, and enrollment into an advanced degree program is at 50% within one year of hire. Discussion Developing a culture of mentorship is key to success of the new graduate nurse. Having a diverse team to assist in mentoring provides the greatest benefits to the new nurse. Collaboration between mentors provides the environment that allows for the professional growth of the new nurse.en
dc.subjectmentoren
dc.subjectlearning environmenten
dc.subjectnovice nurseen
dc.date.available2016-09-16T14:22:13Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-16-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-16T14:22:13Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Connection 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
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