2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620207
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
On-Boarding Adjunct Faculty in Nursing Programs
Other Titles:
Strategies for an Effective Workplace
Author(s):
Marsh, Kathyann
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Kathyann Marsh, RN, CNS, kathymarsh@sandiego.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Tuesday, September 20, 2016: On Boarding Adjunct Faculty in Nursing Programs �Background: Rising enrollments in schools of nursing have increased the demand for qualified nursing faculty. Nursing faculty are essential to prepare future nurses who will provide expert healthcare that meets the needs of individuals who seek care. The lack of sufficient numbers of qualified nursing faculty to prepare nursing students for entry into the field of nursing is of national and international concern. In the midst of a nurse faculty shortage, many academic institutions are relying on adjunct faculty to fill the gap. Recruiting expert clinicians and preparing them as adjunct clinical teachers is one approach to addressing the faculty shortage.�Adequate training for this new role is paramount to promoting job satisfaction and decreasing attrition. Purpose: Beginning with the interview process, a potential adjunct faculty undergoes a holistic interview approach to ascertain if an organizational fit is compatible. In the model presented, adjunct faculty participate in a holistic interview process and receive a four hour orientation to the university. Topics covered are: Quality Safety and Education for Nurses (QSEN Competencies), Clinical Reasoning information, Technology Strategies and Examples of common clinical scenarios. In addition, faculty are oriented to the culture of the university as well as the demographic composition of the nursing class. Methods: All adjunct faculty receive the four hour orientation. All faculty are required to attend a monthly adjunct faculty meeting during the semester. Results: The take away message for nursing schools is this method works for adjunct faculty. The author is happy to share methods to engage adjunct faculty with other universities and program coordinators/directors. Implications: The increasing number of adjunct faculty and their need for orientation to the faculty role presents a challenge to schools of nursing and departments of nursing. The University of San Diego approach is to embrace, educate, and mentor the adjunct faculty.
Keywords:
mentoring; hiring; developing
Repository Posting Date:
16-Sep-2016
Date of Publication:
16-Sep-2016
Other Identifiers:
LEAD16P01
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Leadership Connection 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleOn-Boarding Adjunct Faculty in Nursing Programsen
dc.title.alternativeStrategies for an Effective Workplaceen
dc.contributor.authorMarsh, Kathyannen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsKathyann Marsh, RN, CNS, kathymarsh@sandiego.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620207-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Tuesday, September 20, 2016: On Boarding Adjunct Faculty in Nursing Programs �Background: Rising enrollments in schools of nursing have increased the demand for qualified nursing faculty. Nursing faculty are essential to prepare future nurses who will provide expert healthcare that meets the needs of individuals who seek care. The lack of sufficient numbers of qualified nursing faculty to prepare nursing students for entry into the field of nursing is of national and international concern. In the midst of a nurse faculty shortage, many academic institutions are relying on adjunct faculty to fill the gap. Recruiting expert clinicians and preparing them as adjunct clinical teachers is one approach to addressing the faculty shortage.�Adequate training for this new role is paramount to promoting job satisfaction and decreasing attrition. Purpose: Beginning with the interview process, a potential adjunct faculty undergoes a holistic interview approach to ascertain if an organizational fit is compatible. In the model presented, adjunct faculty participate in a holistic interview process and receive a four hour orientation to the university. Topics covered are: Quality Safety and Education for Nurses (QSEN Competencies), Clinical Reasoning information, Technology Strategies and Examples of common clinical scenarios. In addition, faculty are oriented to the culture of the university as well as the demographic composition of the nursing class. Methods: All adjunct faculty receive the four hour orientation. All faculty are required to attend a monthly adjunct faculty meeting during the semester. Results: The take away message for nursing schools is this method works for adjunct faculty. The author is happy to share methods to engage adjunct faculty with other universities and program coordinators/directors. Implications: The increasing number of adjunct faculty and their need for orientation to the faculty role presents a challenge to schools of nursing and departments of nursing. The University of San Diego approach is to embrace, educate, and mentor the adjunct faculty.en
dc.subjectmentoringen
dc.subjecthiringen
dc.subjectdevelopingen
dc.date.available2016-09-16T14:22:21Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-16-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-16T14:22:21Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Connection 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
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