Evidence-Based Project Yields Practice Change in Emergency Department

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620216
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Evidence-Based Project Yields Practice Change in Emergency Department
Author(s):
Hurwitz, Beth K.; Altmiller, Gerry; Brown, Joanne
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Kappa Delta
Author Details:
Beth K. Hurwitz, RN, CEN, bkriegerrn@comcast.net; Gerry Altmiller, RN; Joanne Brown
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, September 18, 2016: Sigma Theta Tau International Leadership Conference 2016 Poster Abstract Beth K. Hurwitz, RN,BSN, CEN The various methods of pediatric patient temperature measurement have long been debated by those providing care in the emergency department (ED). The gold standard has been the rectal temperature (RT). While accurate, this method causes distress to patients and their families, and adds significant time to the triage process. Prior to this project, children with non-infectious complaints such as fractures or lacerations were being subjected to rectal temperature measurement, causing undo stress. Other methods of temperature measurement such as temporal artery, tympanic, axillary, and infrared have been studied to determine their efficacy and accuracy. In response to this growing dilemma of best practice, a group of emergency department staff nurses from a multihospital system identified an opportunity for improvement which lead them to undertake an evidence-based practice project that included an exhaustive literature search, review of relevant studies, creation of a table of evidence, presentation of findings, and recommendations for practice change. During the search, the committee found that in February 2008, the Society of Pediatric Nurses released a position statement that stated that temporal artery thermometry (TAT) provided accurate temperature measurement in infants greater than 90 days without fever as well as all patients over 3 months with or without fever (Asher & Northington, 2008). In addition, in 2011, the Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) completed its own comprehensive literature review (2011).�They identified that in children younger than 24 months, TAT and RT measurements were highly correlated. Staff used this as a starting point for finding an answer to this practice problem. The project resulted in the adoption of guidelines for use of temporal artery thermometry as a screening tool for pediatric patients older than ninety days that present without infectious complaints.�Nursing, patient and family satisfaction data was tracked over a 9 month period using post-implementation surveys. This poster describes a staff-lead evidence-based practice project to determine whether temporal artery thermometry would provide safe, consistently accurate measurement during triage, increase triage throughput times, and increase patient and nurse satisfaction during the triage process.
Keywords:
pediatric temperature measurement; temporal artery thermometer; evidence based practice
Repository Posting Date:
16-Sep-2016
Date of Publication:
16-Sep-2016
Other Identifiers:
LEAD16PST35
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Leadership Connection 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleEvidence-Based Project Yields Practice Change in Emergency Departmenten
dc.contributor.authorHurwitz, Beth K.en
dc.contributor.authorAltmiller, Gerryen
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Joanneen
dc.contributor.departmentKappa Deltaen
dc.author.detailsBeth K. Hurwitz, RN, CEN, bkriegerrn@comcast.net; Gerry Altmiller, RN; Joanne Brownen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620216-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, September 18, 2016: Sigma Theta Tau International Leadership Conference 2016 Poster Abstract Beth K. Hurwitz, RN,BSN, CEN The various methods of pediatric patient temperature measurement have long been debated by those providing care in the emergency department (ED). The gold standard has been the rectal temperature (RT). While accurate, this method causes distress to patients and their families, and adds significant time to the triage process. Prior to this project, children with non-infectious complaints such as fractures or lacerations were being subjected to rectal temperature measurement, causing undo stress. Other methods of temperature measurement such as temporal artery, tympanic, axillary, and infrared have been studied to determine their efficacy and accuracy. In response to this growing dilemma of best practice, a group of emergency department staff nurses from a multihospital system identified an opportunity for improvement which lead them to undertake an evidence-based practice project that included an exhaustive literature search, review of relevant studies, creation of a table of evidence, presentation of findings, and recommendations for practice change. During the search, the committee found that in February 2008, the Society of Pediatric Nurses released a position statement that stated that temporal artery thermometry (TAT) provided accurate temperature measurement in infants greater than 90 days without fever as well as all patients over 3 months with or without fever (Asher & Northington, 2008). In addition, in 2011, the Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) completed its own comprehensive literature review (2011).�They identified that in children younger than 24 months, TAT and RT measurements were highly correlated. Staff used this as a starting point for finding an answer to this practice problem. The project resulted in the adoption of guidelines for use of temporal artery thermometry as a screening tool for pediatric patients older than ninety days that present without infectious complaints.�Nursing, patient and family satisfaction data was tracked over a 9 month period using post-implementation surveys. This poster describes a staff-lead evidence-based practice project to determine whether temporal artery thermometry would provide safe, consistently accurate measurement during triage, increase triage throughput times, and increase patient and nurse satisfaction during the triage process.en
dc.subjectpediatric temperature measurementen
dc.subjecttemporal artery thermometeren
dc.subjectevidence based practiceen
dc.date.available2016-09-16T14:22:31Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-16-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-16T14:22:31Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Connection 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
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