Financial Insecurity and Attitudes Toward Self-Care Management in Adults With Diabetes

7.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620219
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Financial Insecurity and Attitudes Toward Self-Care Management in Adults With Diabetes
Author(s):
Morris, Jonna
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Jonna Morris, RN, jolee3678@gmail.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, September 18, 2016: Purpose: People with diabetes often struggle with self-care. Financial insecurity may create added challenges. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of participant?s attitudes toward their self-care and their perceived ability to pay for basic needs. Methods: A secondary analysis was done of baseline data (2009-2011) from a study of adults with type 2 diabetes and self-reported sleepiness (R21 HL 089522). Instruments included the Diabetes Care Profile subscales for Positive Attitudes and Negative Attitudes that measured psychological factors affecting self-care and the Profiles of Mood States that measured general mood disturbance. Clinical evaluations included height/weight to calculate BMI kg/m2 and A1C level. Demographic information included age, gender, race, education, marital status, and the question ?How difficult is it for you to meet your basic needs (i.e. food, housing, utilities, and health care?)? with possible responses dichotomized as ?not at all difficult? and ?somewhat or extremely difficult.? Data analysis with IBM SPSS 22 included descriptive statistics, Mann-Whitney U tests, Spearman correlations; and significance, p< .05. Results: The sample (N=107) was middle-aged (Mean � SD = 52.23 � 9.28 years, range = 31-82 years), had suboptimal glucose control (Mean A1C =7.3% � 1.5) and was well distributed by gender, race, education, and marital status (females 58%, non-Caucasian 53%, > high school education 63%; married/partnered 42%). Participants�(n=88, 76%) who responded ?somewhat or extremely difficult? paying for their basic needs were significantly more likely than participants reporting ?not at all difficult? to experience worse negative attitude towards their diabetes self-care, lower positive attitude, and higher mood disturbances, (all p-values < .01). Higher BMI was significantly associated with worse mood disturbance (rho=.31) and lower positive attitude (rho = -.27, p <.01). Conclusion.�Data collection took place during a period of economic depression for many individuals in the United States. In a sample of participants for whom the majority experience financial insecurity, there was a relationship between the perception of their ability to pay for their basic needs and their attitude towards being able to manage their diabetes self-care.
Keywords:
Type 2 Diabetes; Financial disparities; Self-management
Repository Posting Date:
16-Sep-2016
Date of Publication:
16-Sep-2016
Other Identifiers:
LEAD16PST51
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Leadership Connection 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleFinancial Insecurity and Attitudes Toward Self-Care Management in Adults With Diabetesen
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Jonnaen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsJonna Morris, RN, jolee3678@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620219-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, September 18, 2016: Purpose: People with diabetes often struggle with self-care. Financial insecurity may create added challenges. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of participant?s attitudes toward their self-care and their perceived ability to pay for basic needs. Methods: A secondary analysis was done of baseline data (2009-2011) from a study of adults with type 2 diabetes and self-reported sleepiness (R21 HL 089522). Instruments included the Diabetes Care Profile subscales for Positive Attitudes and Negative Attitudes that measured psychological factors affecting self-care and the Profiles of Mood States that measured general mood disturbance. Clinical evaluations included height/weight to calculate BMI kg/m2 and A1C level. Demographic information included age, gender, race, education, marital status, and the question ?How difficult is it for you to meet your basic needs (i.e. food, housing, utilities, and health care?)? with possible responses dichotomized as ?not at all difficult? and ?somewhat or extremely difficult.? Data analysis with IBM SPSS 22 included descriptive statistics, Mann-Whitney U tests, Spearman correlations; and significance, p< .05. Results: The sample (N=107) was middle-aged (Mean � SD = 52.23 � 9.28 years, range = 31-82 years), had suboptimal glucose control (Mean A1C =7.3% � 1.5) and was well distributed by gender, race, education, and marital status (females 58%, non-Caucasian 53%, > high school education 63%; married/partnered 42%). Participants�(n=88, 76%) who responded ?somewhat or extremely difficult? paying for their basic needs were significantly more likely than participants reporting ?not at all difficult? to experience worse negative attitude towards their diabetes self-care, lower positive attitude, and higher mood disturbances, (all p-values < .01). Higher BMI was significantly associated with worse mood disturbance (rho=.31) and lower positive attitude (rho = -.27, p <.01). Conclusion.�Data collection took place during a period of economic depression for many individuals in the United States. In a sample of participants for whom the majority experience financial insecurity, there was a relationship between the perception of their ability to pay for their basic needs and their attitude towards being able to manage their diabetes self-care.en
dc.subjectType 2 Diabetesen
dc.subjectFinancial disparitiesen
dc.subjectSelf-managementen
dc.date.available2016-09-16T14:22:34Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-16-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-16T14:22:34Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Connection 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
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