2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620248
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maximizing Your Abilities as Course Leader
Other Titles:
Faculty Leadership: Strategies for Success
Author(s):
Rice, Robyn
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Phi Pi
Author Details:
Robyn Rice, RN, rrice@chamberlain.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, September 19, 2016: In today?s fast paced world of teaching and learning the role of the faculty as Course Leader as "leader" is increasingly emphasized.� In such a role, faculty as Course Leaders are faced with a variety of challenges such as orientating faculty and students to the course as well as to university standards of practice.�� In such a position, Course Leaders are not only asked to coordinate the many sections of a course but to actually evaluate the faculty that co-teach with them.� Course Leaders are often responsible for course updates and renovation.� They routinely process course issues such as student grade complaints and plagiarism.� They work with clinical agencies as needed.� In addition, as Course Leader, the faculty remains the student?s advocate and mentor.� As leaders they are expected to normalize, support and inspire.� How is all this to be accomplished? This innovative program examines conflicts and communication gaps that may arise in multi-sectional courses and provides faculty, as Course Leaders, specific recommendations for promoting support, coherence and positive change within the course.� Caring communication is discussed.� Onsite and online tips for Course Leaders as "effective leaders" are offered.� Proper usage of email as well as the iPhone are highlighted.� Ways to monitor and promote consistent faculty grading and evaluation of students are identified.� The concepts of colleague and students as customers-learners are emphasized. This program is applicable to the needs of Course Leaders serving in traditional university settings as well as those working in the online milieu.� In addition, both undergraduate and graduate nursing faculty will find this program's content relevant. References Daly, J., Speedy, S., & Jackson, D.� (2015). Leadership and nursing contemporary perspectives.� (2nd ed.).� St. Louis, MO:� Elsevier. Marquis, B., & Huston, C.� (2014). Leadership roles and management functions:� nursing theory and application.� (6th ed.).� Philadelphia, PA:� Lippincott, Williams, & Wilkins.
Keywords:
Course leader; multi-sectional courses; positive change
Repository Posting Date:
16-Sep-2016
Date of Publication:
16-Sep-2016
Other Identifiers:
LEAD16I04
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Leadership Connection 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleMaximizing Your Abilities as Course Leaderen
dc.title.alternativeFaculty Leadership: Strategies for Successen
dc.contributor.authorRice, Robynen
dc.contributor.departmentPhi Pien
dc.author.detailsRobyn Rice, RN, rrice@chamberlain.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620248-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, September 19, 2016: In today?s fast paced world of teaching and learning the role of the faculty as Course Leader as "leader" is increasingly emphasized.� In such a role, faculty as Course Leaders are faced with a variety of challenges such as orientating faculty and students to the course as well as to university standards of practice.�� In such a position, Course Leaders are not only asked to coordinate the many sections of a course but to actually evaluate the faculty that co-teach with them.� Course Leaders are often responsible for course updates and renovation.� They routinely process course issues such as student grade complaints and plagiarism.� They work with clinical agencies as needed.� In addition, as Course Leader, the faculty remains the student?s advocate and mentor.� As leaders they are expected to normalize, support and inspire.� How is all this to be accomplished? This innovative program examines conflicts and communication gaps that may arise in multi-sectional courses and provides faculty, as Course Leaders, specific recommendations for promoting support, coherence and positive change within the course.� Caring communication is discussed.� Onsite and online tips for Course Leaders as "effective leaders" are offered.� Proper usage of email as well as the iPhone are highlighted.� Ways to monitor and promote consistent faculty grading and evaluation of students are identified.� The concepts of colleague and students as customers-learners are emphasized. This program is applicable to the needs of Course Leaders serving in traditional university settings as well as those working in the online milieu.� In addition, both undergraduate and graduate nursing faculty will find this program's content relevant. References Daly, J., Speedy, S., & Jackson, D.� (2015). Leadership and nursing contemporary perspectives.� (2nd ed.).� St. Louis, MO:� Elsevier. Marquis, B., & Huston, C.� (2014). Leadership roles and management functions:� nursing theory and application.� (6th ed.).� Philadelphia, PA:� Lippincott, Williams, & Wilkins.en
dc.subjectCourse leaderen
dc.subjectmulti-sectional coursesen
dc.subjectpositive changeen
dc.date.available2016-09-16T14:23:04Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-16-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-16T14:23:04Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Connection 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
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