2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620248
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maximizing Your Abilities as Course Leader
Other Titles:
Faculty Leadership: Strategies for Success
Author(s):
Rice, Robyn
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Phi Pi
Author Details:
Robyn Rice, RN, rrice@chamberlain.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, September 19, 2016: In today's fast paced world of teaching and learning the role of the faculty as Course Leader as "leader" is increasingly emphasized. In such a role, faculty as Course Leaders are faced with a variety of challenges such as orientating faculty and students to the course as well as to university standards of practice. In such a position, Course Leaders are not only asked to coordinate the many sections of a course but to actually evaluate the faculty that co-teach with them. Course Leaders are often responsible for course updates and renovation. They routinely process course issues such as student grade complaints and plagiarism. They work with clinical agencies as needed. In addition, as Course Leader, the faculty remains the studens advocate and mentor. As leaders they are expected to normalize, support and inspire. How is all this to be accomplished? This innovative program examines conflicts and communication gaps that may arise in multi-sectional courses and provides faculty, as Course Leaders, specific recommendations for promoting support, coherence and positive change within the course. Caring communication is discussed. Onsite and online tips for Course Leaders as "effective leaders" are offered. Proper usage of email as well as the iPhone are highlighted. Ways to monitor and promote consistent faculty grading and evaluation of students are identified. The concepts of colleague and students as customers-learners are emphasized. This program is applicable to the needs of Course Leaders serving in traditional university settings as well as those working in the online milieu. In addition, both undergraduate and graduate nursing faculty will find this program's content relevant. References Daly, J., Speedy, S., & Jackson, D. (2015). Leadership and nursing contemporary perspectives. (2nd ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier. Marquis, B., & Huston, C. (2014). Leadership roles and management functions: nursing theory and application. (6th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott, Williams, & Wilkins.
Keywords:
Course leader; multi-sectional courses; positive change
Repository Posting Date:
16-Sep-2016
Date of Publication:
26-Sep-2016
Other Identifiers:
LEAD16I04
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Leadership Connection 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleMaximizing Your Abilities as Course Leaderen
dc.title.alternativeFaculty Leadership: Strategies for Successen
dc.contributor.authorRice, Robynen
dc.contributor.departmentPhi Pien
dc.author.detailsRobyn Rice, RN, rrice@chamberlain.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620248-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, September 19, 2016: In today's fast paced world of teaching and learning the role of the faculty as Course Leader as "leader" is increasingly emphasized. In such a role, faculty as Course Leaders are faced with a variety of challenges such as orientating faculty and students to the course as well as to university standards of practice. In such a position, Course Leaders are not only asked to coordinate the many sections of a course but to actually evaluate the faculty that co-teach with them. Course Leaders are often responsible for course updates and renovation. They routinely process course issues such as student grade complaints and plagiarism. They work with clinical agencies as needed. In addition, as Course Leader, the faculty remains the studens advocate and mentor. As leaders they are expected to normalize, support and inspire. How is all this to be accomplished? This innovative program examines conflicts and communication gaps that may arise in multi-sectional courses and provides faculty, as Course Leaders, specific recommendations for promoting support, coherence and positive change within the course. Caring communication is discussed. Onsite and online tips for Course Leaders as "effective leaders" are offered. Proper usage of email as well as the iPhone are highlighted. Ways to monitor and promote consistent faculty grading and evaluation of students are identified. The concepts of colleague and students as customers-learners are emphasized. This program is applicable to the needs of Course Leaders serving in traditional university settings as well as those working in the online milieu. In addition, both undergraduate and graduate nursing faculty will find this program's content relevant. References Daly, J., Speedy, S., & Jackson, D. (2015). Leadership and nursing contemporary perspectives. (2nd ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier. Marquis, B., & Huston, C. (2014). Leadership roles and management functions: nursing theory and application. (6th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott, Williams, & Wilkins.en
dc.subjectCourse leaderen
dc.subjectmulti-sectional coursesen
dc.subjectpositive changeen
dc.date.available2016-09-16T14:23:04Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-26-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-16T14:23:04Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Connection 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
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