2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620260
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Nurses' Knowledge of Alcohol-Interactive Medications
Author(s):
Serafico, Kyle; Jarvis, Carolyn M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Theta Pi
Author Details:
Kyle Serafico, kserafic@iwu.edu; Carolyn M. Jarvis, APN, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, September 18, 2016: In the United States, 56.9% of people ages 18 years or over consumed at least one alcoholic beverage in the past month; 24.7% of people in the same age group reported binge drinking in the past month; 6.8% of people in the same age group reported having an alcohol use disorder in the past year. Also, approximately 59% of adults take prescription medications, many of which are considered alcohol-interactive (AI); AI medications are those that interact negatively with alcoholic beverages, resulting in alcohol related adverse drug reactions (ADRs). An estimated 41.5% of current drinkers are on AI medications. Because alcohol related ADRs are suspected to contribute to 25% of all emergency room admissions, we are concerned about concurrent consumption of alcohol and medications, even for responsible drinkers and medication users. The purpose of this literature review is to examine the prevalence of AI medications and the means by which healthcare providers mitigate the risks of alcohol related ADRs. Literature related to the prevalence of alcohol consumption, the prevalence of AI medication consumption, the mechanisms by which the two substances interact, and the prophylactic efforts of healthcare workers to mitigate risks of alcohol related ADRs was reviewed. Preliminary findings from this review reveal a lack of patient education related to alcohol and that the degree of patient education does not match the potential severity and prevalence of alcohol related ADRs. More effort is required to reduce the specific risks of alcohol related ADRs, even to patients who practice responsible drinking and self-managed medication management. Literature related to healthcare providers? functional knowledge about AI medications was searched, but, to date, no such studies specifically focused on healthcare provider knowledge have been published. A functional knowledge of AI medications is necessary for nurses to be vigilant and perform effective patient education to patients on AI medications. This review suggests future research should nurses? assess knowledge of AI medications, as nurses are on the frontline of patient care.
Keywords:
Alcohol-interactive medications; Adverse drug reactions; Pharmacology
Repository Posting Date:
16-Sep-2016
Date of Publication:
16-Sep-2016
Other Identifiers:
LEAD16PST64
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Leadership Connection 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleNurses' Knowledge of Alcohol-Interactive Medicationsen
dc.contributor.authorSerafico, Kyleen
dc.contributor.authorJarvis, Carolyn M.en
dc.contributor.departmentTheta Pien
dc.author.detailsKyle Serafico, kserafic@iwu.edu; Carolyn M. Jarvis, APN, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620260-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, September 18, 2016: In the United States, 56.9% of people ages 18 years or over consumed at least one alcoholic beverage in the past month; 24.7% of people in the same age group reported binge drinking in the past month; 6.8% of people in the same age group reported having an alcohol use disorder in the past year. Also, approximately 59% of adults take prescription medications, many of which are considered alcohol-interactive (AI); AI medications are those that interact negatively with alcoholic beverages, resulting in alcohol related adverse drug reactions (ADRs). An estimated 41.5% of current drinkers are on AI medications. Because alcohol related ADRs are suspected to contribute to 25% of all emergency room admissions, we are concerned about concurrent consumption of alcohol and medications, even for responsible drinkers and medication users. The purpose of this literature review is to examine the prevalence of AI medications and the means by which healthcare providers mitigate the risks of alcohol related ADRs. Literature related to the prevalence of alcohol consumption, the prevalence of AI medication consumption, the mechanisms by which the two substances interact, and the prophylactic efforts of healthcare workers to mitigate risks of alcohol related ADRs was reviewed. Preliminary findings from this review reveal a lack of patient education related to alcohol and that the degree of patient education does not match the potential severity and prevalence of alcohol related ADRs. More effort is required to reduce the specific risks of alcohol related ADRs, even to patients who practice responsible drinking and self-managed medication management. Literature related to healthcare providers? functional knowledge about AI medications was searched, but, to date, no such studies specifically focused on healthcare provider knowledge have been published. A functional knowledge of AI medications is necessary for nurses to be vigilant and perform effective patient education to patients on AI medications. This review suggests future research should nurses? assess knowledge of AI medications, as nurses are on the frontline of patient care.en
dc.subjectAlcohol-interactive medicationsen
dc.subjectAdverse drug reactionsen
dc.subjectPharmacologyen
dc.date.available2016-09-16T14:23:17Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-16-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-16T14:23:17Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Connection 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
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