DASH Diet Reduces Sodium Intake Among African-American Women With Hypertension

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620280
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
DASH Diet Reduces Sodium Intake Among African-American Women With Hypertension
Author(s):
Ibekwe, Stephanie C; Dawson, LaTrecia
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Stephanie C Ibekwe, RN, sibekwe@student.pvamu.edu; LaTrecia Dawson, RN, FNP
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, September 19, 2016: The purpose was to develop, implement, and evaluate a student-led curriculum that used culturally appropriate nursing interventions to address salt-reduction self care behaviors and dietary approaches to stop hypertension among African American women located in an urban community. The curriculum aimed to improve knowledge about dietary approaches to minimize risk for hypertension, increase the participants' confidence in self-care abilities to manage dietary lifestyle changes, and reduce sodium intake among hypertensive African American women. Orem's Self Care Theory was utilized as a guide for its proven effectiveness in the use of self-management to achieve positive health outcomes. Materials developed include soul-food plate visuals, and resource guide. Learning activities included demonstations on how to read food labels for sodium and fat content, receipe modification exercises, case-scenarios, personal stories, shopping for DASH items on a budget, meal planning exercises, learning how to manage serving sizes and portion control with the plate method, and cooking demonstrations. N=38 women participated (mean age= 45 years). A majority reported that they were confident in their ability to integrate healthy life style choices (100%), adhere to the DASH diet (98.3%), purchase DASH items (100%), purchase DASH items and manage a food budget (99%), and read food labels for sodium and fat content (100%). A multi-conceptual approach coupled with culturally tailored nursing interventions have the potential to promote African American women to improve self confidence in their ability to improve self-confidence to reduce dietary sodium consumption. As a result of the intervention, the participants became more receptive to adhering to diet modifications for the management of hypertension. Interventions utilized can be implemented in future practice, as it motivates participants to engage in healthy dietary practices and positive healthcare behaviors. Future interventions should be aimed at teaching health professionals culturally tailored education for the management of patients diagnosed with hypertension.
Keywords:
Hypertension; African American women; Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension
Repository Posting Date:
16-Sep-2016
Date of Publication:
16-Sep-2016
Other Identifiers:
LEAD16PST171
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Leadership Connection 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleDASH Diet Reduces Sodium Intake Among African-American Women With Hypertensionen
dc.contributor.authorIbekwe, Stephanie Cen
dc.contributor.authorDawson, LaTreciaen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsStephanie C Ibekwe, RN, sibekwe@student.pvamu.edu; LaTrecia Dawson, RN, FNPen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620280-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, September 19, 2016: The purpose was to develop, implement, and evaluate a student-led curriculum that used culturally appropriate nursing interventions to address salt-reduction self care behaviors and dietary approaches to stop hypertension among African American women located in an urban community. The curriculum aimed to improve knowledge about dietary approaches to minimize risk for hypertension, increase the participants' confidence in self-care abilities to manage dietary lifestyle changes, and reduce sodium intake among hypertensive African American women. Orem's Self Care Theory was utilized as a guide for its proven effectiveness in the use of self-management to achieve positive health outcomes. Materials developed include soul-food plate visuals, and resource guide. Learning activities included demonstations on how to read food labels for sodium and fat content, receipe modification exercises, case-scenarios, personal stories, shopping for DASH items on a budget, meal planning exercises, learning how to manage serving sizes and portion control with the plate method, and cooking demonstrations. N=38 women participated (mean age= 45 years). A majority reported that they were confident in their ability to integrate healthy life style choices (100%), adhere to the DASH diet (98.3%), purchase DASH items (100%), purchase DASH items and manage a food budget (99%), and read food labels for sodium and fat content (100%). A multi-conceptual approach coupled with culturally tailored nursing interventions have the potential to promote African American women to improve self confidence in their ability to improve self-confidence to reduce dietary sodium consumption. As a result of the intervention, the participants became more receptive to adhering to diet modifications for the management of hypertension. Interventions utilized can be implemented in future practice, as it motivates participants to engage in healthy dietary practices and positive healthcare behaviors. Future interventions should be aimed at teaching health professionals culturally tailored education for the management of patients diagnosed with hypertension.en
dc.subjectHypertensionen
dc.subjectAfrican American womenen
dc.subjectDietary Approaches to Stop Hypertensionen
dc.date.available2016-09-16T14:23:40Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-16-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-16T14:23:40Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Connection 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
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