A Unique Academic Leadership Modality and Mentoring Model in an Online, Competency-Based, Graduate Nursing Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620292
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Unique Academic Leadership Modality and Mentoring Model in an Online, Competency-Based, Graduate Nursing Program
Other Titles:
Strategies for Online Learning
Author(s):
Liske, Carole D.; Starkey, Traci J.; Austgen, Donna M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Carole D. Liske, RN, cdliske@gmail.com; Traci J. Starkey, RN; Donna M. Austgen, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Tuesday, September 20, 2016: This presentation will examine an academic leadership modality in a competency-based nursing program that offers an innovative and authentic method of delivering education in a virtual setting. In this competency based nursing program, the mentoring model takes a radical departure from the traditional education model.� �When supported by this intentional academic mentoring model, students experience a profound change in attitudes toward course content, online technologies, teamwork, and applied nursing practice (Barkley, 2014; Parker, 2013). The unique mentoring model is utilized to enhance the development of leadership skills in faculty and in graduate nursing students.� Faculty Course Mentors develop the necessary leadership skills to prioritize and personalize student academic mentoring strategies.�� Graduate nursing students learn collaborative leadership skills to serve as effective change agents in their healthcare organizations to achieve desired outcomes. Academic mentoring by Course Mentor faculty offers an innovative and authentic method of delivering education in a virtual setting.� In this technology driven setting, a unique and modern approach to academic leadership is coupled with input from external partners and leaders in the health care industry.� This input enhances and promotes the student-centered experience (Jones-Schenk, 2014).��The curriculum design integrates a faculty leadership and mentoring model that promotes ongoing student-faculty mentor interaction and faculty mentor-program manager interaction.� The integration of the ongoing mentoring also fosters authentic learning, collaborative scholarly inquiry, and enhancement of student success.� The faculty model consists of clearly delineated, disaggregated faculty roles which include Program Managers, Course Mentors, Student Mentors, and Evaluators who are committed to student achievement of nursing program outcomes that align with the CCNE Essentials of Master?s Education in Nursing.� Program Managers collaborate with mentors to ensure ongoing professional growth and development. ��The Program Manager continually applies metric-driven strategies to promote effective mentoring and enhance student outcomes. �Course Mentors are accountable for the quality and integrity of educational programs, and consistently provide relevant and innovative academic resources to meet the needs of a diverse student population. �Course Mentors are subject matter experts who support students as they engage in specific sections of the curriculum. �Through intentional, individualized interactions, faculty mentors identify academic needs, embrace diversity, and promote scholarly pursuits. �Student Mentors provide foundational and ongoing support for successful student growth. Student mentors advise and coach students throughout the program and offer academic guidance and coaching to promote work-school-life balance.� Additionally, the advice provided assists students in successfully navigating their educational experience by utilizing all available resources.� �Resources include services identified through referrals to the student support center, the center for writing excellence, and individualized wellness programs.� Evaluators are subject matter experts tasked with reviewing assessment submissions in a fair and unbiased manner to determine if competency has been demonstrated. ��Evaluators have no contact with faculty mentors nor students in order to preserve objectivity and reduce bias in the evaluation process. �Written feedback is provided to enhance student performance. Student-student, student-mentor, and student-stakeholder interactions are supported by multiple communication technologies such as web conferencing, cohorts, emails, short video recordings, and telephone conversations.� Quality mentoring communications support students in overcoming barriers and increase student retention rates through the development of a strong sense of connectedness (Irani, Wilson, Slough & Rieger, 2014; LaBarbera, 2013).� Student outcomes demonstrate heightened student satisfaction with 93% satisfied/very satisfied with this academic mentoring leadership model (Jones-Schenk, 2014).� Student reflections have also revealed the positive effects of this academic leadership modality.� The authenticity of the mentoring creates a deep sense of connectedness between the students, stakeholders, course mentors, and student mentors, and ?brings out the best? in each learner. Students learn to work collaboratively, think creatively, and move beyond their comfort zone.� Students also reported a new awareness of the complexity of healthcare systems that transformed their nursing practice and enhanced their role as a clinical/academic nurse leader within organizations.
Keywords:
academic leadership modality; mentoring model; competency-based online learning
Repository Posting Date:
16-Sep-2016
Date of Publication:
16-Sep-2016
Other Identifiers:
LEAD16P02
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Leadership Connection 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleA Unique Academic Leadership Modality and Mentoring Model in an Online, Competency-Based, Graduate Nursing Programen
dc.title.alternativeStrategies for Online Learningen
dc.contributor.authorLiske, Carole D.en
dc.contributor.authorStarkey, Traci J.en
dc.contributor.authorAustgen, Donna M.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsCarole D. Liske, RN, cdliske@gmail.com; Traci J. Starkey, RN; Donna M. Austgen, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620292-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Tuesday, September 20, 2016: This presentation will examine an academic leadership modality in a competency-based nursing program that offers an innovative and authentic method of delivering education in a virtual setting. In this competency based nursing program, the mentoring model takes a radical departure from the traditional education model.� �When supported by this intentional academic mentoring model, students experience a profound change in attitudes toward course content, online technologies, teamwork, and applied nursing practice (Barkley, 2014; Parker, 2013). The unique mentoring model is utilized to enhance the development of leadership skills in faculty and in graduate nursing students.� Faculty Course Mentors develop the necessary leadership skills to prioritize and personalize student academic mentoring strategies.�� Graduate nursing students learn collaborative leadership skills to serve as effective change agents in their healthcare organizations to achieve desired outcomes. Academic mentoring by Course Mentor faculty offers an innovative and authentic method of delivering education in a virtual setting.� In this technology driven setting, a unique and modern approach to academic leadership is coupled with input from external partners and leaders in the health care industry.� This input enhances and promotes the student-centered experience (Jones-Schenk, 2014).��The curriculum design integrates a faculty leadership and mentoring model that promotes ongoing student-faculty mentor interaction and faculty mentor-program manager interaction.� The integration of the ongoing mentoring also fosters authentic learning, collaborative scholarly inquiry, and enhancement of student success.� The faculty model consists of clearly delineated, disaggregated faculty roles which include Program Managers, Course Mentors, Student Mentors, and Evaluators who are committed to student achievement of nursing program outcomes that align with the CCNE Essentials of Master?s Education in Nursing.� Program Managers collaborate with mentors to ensure ongoing professional growth and development. ��The Program Manager continually applies metric-driven strategies to promote effective mentoring and enhance student outcomes. �Course Mentors are accountable for the quality and integrity of educational programs, and consistently provide relevant and innovative academic resources to meet the needs of a diverse student population. �Course Mentors are subject matter experts who support students as they engage in specific sections of the curriculum. �Through intentional, individualized interactions, faculty mentors identify academic needs, embrace diversity, and promote scholarly pursuits. �Student Mentors provide foundational and ongoing support for successful student growth. Student mentors advise and coach students throughout the program and offer academic guidance and coaching to promote work-school-life balance.� Additionally, the advice provided assists students in successfully navigating their educational experience by utilizing all available resources.� �Resources include services identified through referrals to the student support center, the center for writing excellence, and individualized wellness programs.� Evaluators are subject matter experts tasked with reviewing assessment submissions in a fair and unbiased manner to determine if competency has been demonstrated. ��Evaluators have no contact with faculty mentors nor students in order to preserve objectivity and reduce bias in the evaluation process. �Written feedback is provided to enhance student performance. Student-student, student-mentor, and student-stakeholder interactions are supported by multiple communication technologies such as web conferencing, cohorts, emails, short video recordings, and telephone conversations.� Quality mentoring communications support students in overcoming barriers and increase student retention rates through the development of a strong sense of connectedness (Irani, Wilson, Slough & Rieger, 2014; LaBarbera, 2013).� Student outcomes demonstrate heightened student satisfaction with 93% satisfied/very satisfied with this academic mentoring leadership model (Jones-Schenk, 2014).� Student reflections have also revealed the positive effects of this academic leadership modality.� The authenticity of the mentoring creates a deep sense of connectedness between the students, stakeholders, course mentors, and student mentors, and ?brings out the best? in each learner. Students learn to work collaboratively, think creatively, and move beyond their comfort zone.� Students also reported a new awareness of the complexity of healthcare systems that transformed their nursing practice and enhanced their role as a clinical/academic nurse leader within organizations.en
dc.subjectacademic leadership modalityen
dc.subjectmentoring modelen
dc.subjectcompetency-based online learningen
dc.date.available2016-09-16T14:23:52Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-16-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-16T14:23:52Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Connection 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
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