2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620300
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Peer-Mentorship for Clinical Leadership
Author(s):
Buckalew, Lynn H.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Omicron Lambda
Author Details:
Lynn H. Buckalew, RN, buckalew@mc.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, September 19, 2016: Nurse educators are challenged to find methods that promote clinical leadership and collaboration in the rapidly changing health care arena.� In an effort to provide senior level nursing student?s opportunities to function in a leadership role, a peer-mentoring program is being implemented.� Hunt and Ellison (2010) define peer mentoring as a relationship between people with varying levels of expertise.�� Currently, a peer-mentoring project is being implemented to assist the senior level student with leadership in the areas of communication, collaboration, and coordination of patient care.� Senior level students have been paired with first and second semester faculty to assist with mentoring of lower level students in the clinical setting.� The clinical instructor defines the peer-mentor?s responsibilities in the various clinical settings guides and provides an overview of the lower level student learning objectives.� Peer-mentor duties include, but are not limited to:� medication preparation, clinical skills, therapeutic communication, supervision, and delegation.� The desired outcome of this project is for the senior student to demonstrate leadership skills, to promote collaboration, facilitate learning, and inspire the lower level nursing student.� A review of the literature supported the decision to implement this project.� Ford (2015), Rosenau, Lisella, Clancy and Nowell (2015), Zentz, Kurtz, and Alverson (2014), and Hunt and Ellison (2010) all researched the student?s experiences of peer-assisted learning in the clinical or laboratory setting.� And in 2010, Dennison described the potential of peer mentoring. �The literature review revealed a lack of perceptions from nursing faculty regarding the leadership potential of peer mentoring.� This lack of information inspired the notion of a qualitative study on faculty perceptions of peer mentoring as a method to promote leadership and collaboration.� At the end of the semester, clinical faculty will be individually interviewed on a volunteer basis regarding their experiences with peer mentoring.� Questions regarding effectiveness of the project, senior student preparedness, helpfulness, and potential for future use will be asked.� All questions will be recorded and analyzed for recurring themes.� As faculty members are encouraged to develop leadership potential and collaboration skills in students, information gathered will examine the peer-mentoring project through the lens of the experienced faculty member.� The lived experience of the clinical nursing faculty will help shape the use of peer-mentors for future semesters.� With this in mind, best practices for the peer-mentors can be developed.
Keywords:
Peer-Mentorship; Nursing Education; Clinical Leadership
Repository Posting Date:
16-Sep-2016
Date of Publication:
16-Sep-2016
Other Identifiers:
LEAD16PST112
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Leadership Connection 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titlePeer-Mentorship for Clinical Leadershipen
dc.contributor.authorBuckalew, Lynn H.en
dc.contributor.departmentOmicron Lambdaen
dc.author.detailsLynn H. Buckalew, RN, buckalew@mc.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620300-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, September 19, 2016: Nurse educators are challenged to find methods that promote clinical leadership and collaboration in the rapidly changing health care arena.� In an effort to provide senior level nursing student?s opportunities to function in a leadership role, a peer-mentoring program is being implemented.� Hunt and Ellison (2010) define peer mentoring as a relationship between people with varying levels of expertise.�� Currently, a peer-mentoring project is being implemented to assist the senior level student with leadership in the areas of communication, collaboration, and coordination of patient care.� Senior level students have been paired with first and second semester faculty to assist with mentoring of lower level students in the clinical setting.� The clinical instructor defines the peer-mentor?s responsibilities in the various clinical settings guides and provides an overview of the lower level student learning objectives.� Peer-mentor duties include, but are not limited to:� medication preparation, clinical skills, therapeutic communication, supervision, and delegation.� The desired outcome of this project is for the senior student to demonstrate leadership skills, to promote collaboration, facilitate learning, and inspire the lower level nursing student.� A review of the literature supported the decision to implement this project.� Ford (2015), Rosenau, Lisella, Clancy and Nowell (2015), Zentz, Kurtz, and Alverson (2014), and Hunt and Ellison (2010) all researched the student?s experiences of peer-assisted learning in the clinical or laboratory setting.� And in 2010, Dennison described the potential of peer mentoring. �The literature review revealed a lack of perceptions from nursing faculty regarding the leadership potential of peer mentoring.� This lack of information inspired the notion of a qualitative study on faculty perceptions of peer mentoring as a method to promote leadership and collaboration.� At the end of the semester, clinical faculty will be individually interviewed on a volunteer basis regarding their experiences with peer mentoring.� Questions regarding effectiveness of the project, senior student preparedness, helpfulness, and potential for future use will be asked.� All questions will be recorded and analyzed for recurring themes.� As faculty members are encouraged to develop leadership potential and collaboration skills in students, information gathered will examine the peer-mentoring project through the lens of the experienced faculty member.� The lived experience of the clinical nursing faculty will help shape the use of peer-mentors for future semesters.� With this in mind, best practices for the peer-mentors can be developed.en
dc.subjectPeer-Mentorshipen
dc.subjectNursing Educationen
dc.subjectClinical Leadershipen
dc.date.available2016-09-16T14:24:00Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-16-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-16T14:24:00Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Connection 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
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