Nursing Academic Leadership, Learning from the Past, Planning for the Future: A Systematic Review

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620302
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Nursing Academic Leadership, Learning from the Past, Planning for the Future: A Systematic Review
Author(s):
Johnson, Shelley; Cantwell, Renee; Wagner, Patricia
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Xi
Author Details:
Shelley Johnson, RN, RN-BC, NE-BC, CNE, Shelley.Johnson@chamberlain.edu; Renee Cantwell, RN, CNE; Patricia Wagner, GNP-BC
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, September 19, 2016: Abstract: Not only is there a shortage of qualified nursing faculty, a dearth in top nursing academic leaders is real and threatens the growth and stability of nursing education. Upper-level nursing academic leaders are essential to maintain sound nursing education, continue building nursing as a profession, advocate for nurse and patient safety, and develop healthcare related policy. A systematic review of current literature was analyzed to answer the questions: What has been learned related to strengthening and planning for quality nursing academic leadership? What components are needed to assist in planning for next steps in preparation of prospective nursing academic leaders? Methodology: Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) was the primary database utilized in gathering literature for this review. �The following search terms used included combinations of: leadership, academia, nursing education, deans, directors, chairs, mentoring, succession planning, strategic planning, and leadership development. Journal articles published in the last 15 years were reviewed and articles written between 2005 and 2016 were selected. The CINAHL search identified 25 articles from which 15 provided information about the characteristics of academic nursing leaders and suggestions regarding succession planning for academic leaders in nursing. Findings: Nursing literature has been inundated with urgent messages about the nursing faculty shortage. Based on data from the American Association Colleges of Nurses (ACCN, 2006), the shortage of nursing education leaders is correspondingly dire. According to AACN, nursing administrators are at or beyond retirement age and there are many vacant positions for qualified nursing academic leaders. Proficiency in leading nursing education programs is not instinctively absorbed by faculty being in close proximity to nursing administrators. Just as good staff nurses do not automatically translate into clinical nurse administrators, time and effort must be placed into the intentional development on strong nursing academic leaders. Academic nurse leaders must: be proficient in leadership multi-generational groups at varying levels of experience in nursing education, have politically acumen in educating and communicating needs of students and faculty senior level administration and local government officials, engage in budget planning, monitoring, analysis, and make projections about vision for future expectations, keep abreast of trends in research, business, health law, education, health/disease trends, and clinical practice, have the ability to understand statistical data and use the evidence as a basis for decision-making, maintain close connections to health care organizations and professional nursing organizations, and participate on committees, taskforces, and local, national, and international boards. Current issues facing the present-day nursing education leaders include: the faculty shortage, increased licensure requirements and rigor, increasing cost of program maintenance, global environment, technological advancement, inter-generational dynamics, and changes in healthcare environment for clinical partners. Conclusion: The literature is replete with research relating to the responsibilities, characteristics, and leadership styles of nursing leaders while very few studies exist that suggest mechanisms for ongoing leadership maintenance and succession planning for leaders in nursing education. In addition, several articles focus on the difficulties associated with the nursing academic leadership role, and not on the positive aspects of leadership in academia. Recommendations: To attract quality academic leadership candidates, the literature suggests early identification of highly capable individuals, the implementation of formal mentorship support from organizations, identification of clearly defined pathways to leadership, presentation of positive views of nursing education administration, and the creation of�accessible support systems. References: Carlson, E., Klakovich, M., Broscious, S., Delack, S., Roche-Dean, M., Hittle, K., & Alston, P. (2011). Board�leadership development: The key to effective nursing leadership in the 21st century. The Journal�of Continuing Education in Nursing, 42(3), 107-13; quiz 114-5.� doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/00220124-20101201-03 Griffith, M. B. (2012). Effective succession planning in nursing: a review of the literature. Journal of�Nursing Management, 20(7), 900-911 12p. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2834.2012.01418.x Patterson, B. J., & Krouse, A. M. (2015). Competencies for leaders in nursing education. Nursing�Education Perspectives, 36(2), 76-78. Retrieved from�http://search.proquest.com/docview/1665115917?accountid=458 Young, Patricia K, PhD., R.N. (2011). Developing a portrait of a nursing education leader. Nursing�Education Perspectives, 32(2), 136-7. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/863645865?accountid=458
Keywords:
Nursing leadership shortage; succession planning; leadership development
Repository Posting Date:
16-Sep-2016
Date of Publication:
16-Sep-2016
Other Identifiers:
LEAD16PST130
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Leadership Connection 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleNursing Academic Leadership, Learning from the Past, Planning for the Future: A Systematic Reviewen
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Shelleyen
dc.contributor.authorCantwell, Reneeen
dc.contributor.authorWagner, Patriciaen
dc.contributor.departmentXien
dc.author.detailsShelley Johnson, RN, RN-BC, NE-BC, CNE, Shelley.Johnson@chamberlain.edu; Renee Cantwell, RN, CNE; Patricia Wagner, GNP-BCen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620302-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, September 19, 2016: Abstract: Not only is there a shortage of qualified nursing faculty, a dearth in top nursing academic leaders is real and threatens the growth and stability of nursing education. Upper-level nursing academic leaders are essential to maintain sound nursing education, continue building nursing as a profession, advocate for nurse and patient safety, and develop healthcare related policy. A systematic review of current literature was analyzed to answer the questions: What has been learned related to strengthening and planning for quality nursing academic leadership? What components are needed to assist in planning for next steps in preparation of prospective nursing academic leaders? Methodology: Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) was the primary database utilized in gathering literature for this review. �The following search terms used included combinations of: leadership, academia, nursing education, deans, directors, chairs, mentoring, succession planning, strategic planning, and leadership development. Journal articles published in the last 15 years were reviewed and articles written between 2005 and 2016 were selected. The CINAHL search identified 25 articles from which 15 provided information about the characteristics of academic nursing leaders and suggestions regarding succession planning for academic leaders in nursing. Findings: Nursing literature has been inundated with urgent messages about the nursing faculty shortage. Based on data from the American Association Colleges of Nurses (ACCN, 2006), the shortage of nursing education leaders is correspondingly dire. According to AACN, nursing administrators are at or beyond retirement age and there are many vacant positions for qualified nursing academic leaders. Proficiency in leading nursing education programs is not instinctively absorbed by faculty being in close proximity to nursing administrators. Just as good staff nurses do not automatically translate into clinical nurse administrators, time and effort must be placed into the intentional development on strong nursing academic leaders. Academic nurse leaders must: be proficient in leadership multi-generational groups at varying levels of experience in nursing education, have politically acumen in educating and communicating needs of students and faculty senior level administration and local government officials, engage in budget planning, monitoring, analysis, and make projections about vision for future expectations, keep abreast of trends in research, business, health law, education, health/disease trends, and clinical practice, have the ability to understand statistical data and use the evidence as a basis for decision-making, maintain close connections to health care organizations and professional nursing organizations, and participate on committees, taskforces, and local, national, and international boards. Current issues facing the present-day nursing education leaders include: the faculty shortage, increased licensure requirements and rigor, increasing cost of program maintenance, global environment, technological advancement, inter-generational dynamics, and changes in healthcare environment for clinical partners. Conclusion: The literature is replete with research relating to the responsibilities, characteristics, and leadership styles of nursing leaders while very few studies exist that suggest mechanisms for ongoing leadership maintenance and succession planning for leaders in nursing education. In addition, several articles focus on the difficulties associated with the nursing academic leadership role, and not on the positive aspects of leadership in academia. Recommendations: To attract quality academic leadership candidates, the literature suggests early identification of highly capable individuals, the implementation of formal mentorship support from organizations, identification of clearly defined pathways to leadership, presentation of positive views of nursing education administration, and the creation of�accessible support systems. References: Carlson, E., Klakovich, M., Broscious, S., Delack, S., Roche-Dean, M., Hittle, K., & Alston, P. (2011). Board�leadership development: The key to effective nursing leadership in the 21st century. The Journal�of Continuing Education in Nursing, 42(3), 107-13; quiz 114-5.� doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/00220124-20101201-03 Griffith, M. B. (2012). Effective succession planning in nursing: a review of the literature. Journal of�Nursing Management, 20(7), 900-911 12p. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2834.2012.01418.x Patterson, B. J., & Krouse, A. M. (2015). Competencies for leaders in nursing education. Nursing�Education Perspectives, 36(2), 76-78. Retrieved from�http://search.proquest.com/docview/1665115917?accountid=458 Young, Patricia K, PhD., R.N. (2011). Developing a portrait of a nursing education leader. Nursing�Education Perspectives, 32(2), 136-7. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/863645865?accountid=458en
dc.subjectNursing leadership shortageen
dc.subjectsuccession planningen
dc.subjectleadership developmenten
dc.date.available2016-09-16T14:24:02Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-16-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-16T14:24:02Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Connection 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
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