Factors Associated With Inpatient Injurious Falls in Acute Care Hospitals

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620313
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
Factors Associated With Inpatient Injurious Falls in Acute Care Hospitals
Author(s):
Zhao, Yunchuan; Bott, Marjorie
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Mu Gamma
Author Details:
Yunchuan Zhao, RN, lucyzhao@boisestate.edu; Marjorie Bott, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, September 18, 2016: Background: Inpatient falls and injurious falls in acute care settings have significant impact on patients. Despite the implementation of several federal initiatives in preventing falls and injurious falls, inpatient falls and injurious falls still are prevalent in the United States. Inpatient falls and injurious falls are a complicated phenomenon and can be contributed to multilevel factors including organization at the hospital and unit levels, nursing care process, and patient-specific factors. However, gaps exist in the literature on the associations of injurious falls with multilevel factors. The purpose of this study is to examine the associations of injurious falls among all patient falls with multilevel factors in acute care hospitals. Methods: Guided by the modified Donabedian Structure?Process?Outcome (SPO) model, this cross-sectional, correlational study used National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators? (NDNQI? ) data from July 2013 to June 2014. The sample included all falls recorded in adult medical, surgical, medical-surgical, and step-down units (N = 2,299) in NDNQI? participating hospitals (N = 488).�The STATA (Version 14) was used to conduct descriptive and hierarchical negative binominal regression analyses to examine the significance of association of injurious falls with multilevel factors including organizational structure (i.e., hospital size, teaching status, and Magnet? �status), unit structure (i.e., nurse staffing and unit type), nursing care process (i.e., falls without employee assistance, fall risk assessment, implementation of fall prevention protocol, and physical restrain use) and unit patient population factors for patients who fell (i.e., gender, and fall risk status). The outcome variable was the number of injurious falls among all recorded falls. Results: There were on average 78.9 reported annual falls (range = 1 - 864) and 5.2 injurious falls (range = 1-131) across the units. Falls in teaching hospitals were 13% less likely to be injurious falls (p = 0.001). Falls on surgical units were 8% more likely to be injurious falls (p = 0.021). RN hours per patient day (HPPD) demonstrated a non-linear relationship with injurious falls. Falls without employee assistance were 50% more likely to be injurious falls (p = 0.004). Conclusions/Implications: The study adds new knowledge about multi-level factors contributing to inpatient injurious falls in acute care hospitals. Nurse leaders, researchers and policy makers may develop, implement and improve fall prevention programs based on the identified risk factors. The study also provides important implications for future research on injurious fall prevention in acute care hospitals.
Keywords:
injurious falls; risk factors; acute care hospitals
Repository Posting Date:
16-Sep-2016
Date of Publication:
16-Sep-2016
Other Identifiers:
LEAD16PST78
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Leadership Connection 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleFactors Associated With Inpatient Injurious Falls in Acute Care Hospitalsen
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Yunchuanen
dc.contributor.authorBott, Marjorieen
dc.contributor.departmentMu Gammaen
dc.author.detailsYunchuan Zhao, RN, lucyzhao@boisestate.edu; Marjorie Bott, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620313-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, September 18, 2016: Background: Inpatient falls and injurious falls in acute care settings have significant impact on patients. Despite the implementation of several federal initiatives in preventing falls and injurious falls, inpatient falls and injurious falls still are prevalent in the United States. Inpatient falls and injurious falls are a complicated phenomenon and can be contributed to multilevel factors including organization at the hospital and unit levels, nursing care process, and patient-specific factors. However, gaps exist in the literature on the associations of injurious falls with multilevel factors. The purpose of this study is to examine the associations of injurious falls among all patient falls with multilevel factors in acute care hospitals. Methods: Guided by the modified Donabedian Structure?Process?Outcome (SPO) model, this cross-sectional, correlational study used National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators? (NDNQI? ) data from July 2013 to June 2014. The sample included all falls recorded in adult medical, surgical, medical-surgical, and step-down units (N = 2,299) in NDNQI? participating hospitals (N = 488).�The STATA (Version 14) was used to conduct descriptive and hierarchical negative binominal regression analyses to examine the significance of association of injurious falls with multilevel factors including organizational structure (i.e., hospital size, teaching status, and Magnet? �status), unit structure (i.e., nurse staffing and unit type), nursing care process (i.e., falls without employee assistance, fall risk assessment, implementation of fall prevention protocol, and physical restrain use) and unit patient population factors for patients who fell (i.e., gender, and fall risk status). The outcome variable was the number of injurious falls among all recorded falls. Results: There were on average 78.9 reported annual falls (range = 1 - 864) and 5.2 injurious falls (range = 1-131) across the units. Falls in teaching hospitals were 13% less likely to be injurious falls (p = 0.001). Falls on surgical units were 8% more likely to be injurious falls (p = 0.021). RN hours per patient day (HPPD) demonstrated a non-linear relationship with injurious falls. Falls without employee assistance were 50% more likely to be injurious falls (p = 0.004). Conclusions/Implications: The study adds new knowledge about multi-level factors contributing to inpatient injurious falls in acute care hospitals. Nurse leaders, researchers and policy makers may develop, implement and improve fall prevention programs based on the identified risk factors. The study also provides important implications for future research on injurious fall prevention in acute care hospitals.en
dc.subjectinjurious fallsen
dc.subjectrisk factorsen
dc.subjectacute care hospitalsen
dc.date.available2016-09-16T14:24:12Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-16-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-16T14:24:12Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Connection 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
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