A Grounded Theory Approach to Explore How Women Perceive Menopause

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620328
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Title:
A Grounded Theory Approach to Explore How Women Perceive Menopause
Author(s):
Shamsalizadeh, Neda; Pierce, Carolyn S.; Rouhana, Nicole
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Neda Shamsalizadeh, nshamsa1@binghamton.edu; Carolyn S. Pierce, RN; Nicole Rouhana, RN, FACNM, FNP-BC
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, September 18, 2016: Aim: This poster aims to present the perceived meanings of menopause using Grounded Theory approach within the Iranian context as a Muslim country. The poster?s main objectives are: (a) to understand the uniqueness of an individual?s menopausal perceptions and that how these differences influence in delivery of nursing care. (b) to identify the multiple dimensions of women?s menopause perception as a nursing phenomenon within Iranian context as a Muslim country Background: 220 million Muslim women reported to be in the postmenopausal or climacteric period�(Mahadeen, Halabi, & Callister 2008). It is predicted that the amount of postmenopausal women will rise from almost 477 million in 1998 to 1.1 billion in 2025 (Theroux, 2010). A study by Ama & Ngome, (2013) has shown that menopause is a transitional period which continues from 1 to 10 years depending on different internal and external factors. Menopause is defined physiologically as the permanent session of menstruation, which normally occurs between the ages of 45 and 54 and lasts for one year. This physiological definition does not cover all aspects of women?s menopause experience. Many of the studies in the literature have focused on one aspect of menopause. Although physiological, socio-cultural, spiritual, individual, sexual,�and psychological�dimensions of menopause have been studied in the literature, they have not been integrated collectively (Lindh?�strand, Hoffmann, Hammar, & Kjellgren, 2007).�Differences in menopausal symptoms have been referred to multiple factors such as ?culture, society, education and economic condition? (Hakimi, Simbar, & Tehrani, 2014). The meaning of menopause is different among women because menopause experience is unique for each individual (Hakimi, et al., 2014). Physiological and symptomatology focus on menopause is gradually shifting to reality of human experiences and perceptions. Methodology: A qualitative exploratory research applying grounded theory approach will be used. Data has been collected from 9 individuals through 1 focus group and 6 individual in-depth interviews. Data collection was started with an open ended question of ?what does menopause mean to you? and further questions asked based on participants? responses. Collected data was audio-taped, transcribed verbatim. Coding process will be performed and emerging themes will be reported. Significance: Holistic care provides the opportunity to provide care based on cultural competence care. Cultural competent care is highly important in pluralistic multicultural societies such as United States. As the U.S. becomes more heterogeneous, the role of cultural competent care becomes more critical. Health care professionals need to provide care for patients from different racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds through culturally competent care. It is important to note that women will bring their individual culturally based menopausal concerns that reveal how menopause is perceived and defined by them. Implications: Understanding the fact that what really a woman goes through during her menopause experience and knowing multiple dimensions of women?s menopause perception, can help health care providers to promote woman?s health by providing support, education, and performing necessary interventions. Increasing patient?s self efficacy can be performed while considering patient?s cultural sensitivities. Patient education can reform wrong cultural beliefs and myths regarding menopause. In addition information gained from the women?s menopause experiences can be used as a resource to support future community public health programming and appropriate policy changes necessary to ensure continued positive social change for this vulnerable group of women.
Keywords:
Menopause; Grounded Theory; Qualitative Research
Repository Posting Date:
16-Sep-2016
Date of Publication:
16-Sep-2016
Other Identifiers:
LEAD16PST66
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Leadership Connection 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleA Grounded Theory Approach to Explore How Women Perceive Menopauseen
dc.contributor.authorShamsalizadeh, Nedaen
dc.contributor.authorPierce, Carolyn S.en
dc.contributor.authorRouhana, Nicoleen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsNeda Shamsalizadeh, nshamsa1@binghamton.edu; Carolyn S. Pierce, RN; Nicole Rouhana, RN, FACNM, FNP-BCen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620328-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, September 18, 2016: Aim: This poster aims to present the perceived meanings of menopause using Grounded Theory approach within the Iranian context as a Muslim country. The poster?s main objectives are: (a) to understand the uniqueness of an individual?s menopausal perceptions and that how these differences influence in delivery of nursing care. (b) to identify the multiple dimensions of women?s menopause perception as a nursing phenomenon within Iranian context as a Muslim country Background: 220 million Muslim women reported to be in the postmenopausal or climacteric period�(Mahadeen, Halabi, & Callister 2008). It is predicted that the amount of postmenopausal women will rise from almost 477 million in 1998 to 1.1 billion in 2025 (Theroux, 2010). A study by Ama & Ngome, (2013) has shown that menopause is a transitional period which continues from 1 to 10 years depending on different internal and external factors. Menopause is defined physiologically as the permanent session of menstruation, which normally occurs between the ages of 45 and 54 and lasts for one year. This physiological definition does not cover all aspects of women?s menopause experience. Many of the studies in the literature have focused on one aspect of menopause. Although physiological, socio-cultural, spiritual, individual, sexual,�and psychological�dimensions of menopause have been studied in the literature, they have not been integrated collectively (Lindh?�strand, Hoffmann, Hammar, & Kjellgren, 2007).�Differences in menopausal symptoms have been referred to multiple factors such as ?culture, society, education and economic condition? (Hakimi, Simbar, & Tehrani, 2014). The meaning of menopause is different among women because menopause experience is unique for each individual (Hakimi, et al., 2014). Physiological and symptomatology focus on menopause is gradually shifting to reality of human experiences and perceptions. Methodology: A qualitative exploratory research applying grounded theory approach will be used. Data has been collected from 9 individuals through 1 focus group and 6 individual in-depth interviews. Data collection was started with an open ended question of ?what does menopause mean to you? and further questions asked based on participants? responses. Collected data was audio-taped, transcribed verbatim. Coding process will be performed and emerging themes will be reported. Significance: Holistic care provides the opportunity to provide care based on cultural competence care. Cultural competent care is highly important in pluralistic multicultural societies such as United States. As the U.S. becomes more heterogeneous, the role of cultural competent care becomes more critical. Health care professionals need to provide care for patients from different racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds through culturally competent care. It is important to note that women will bring their individual culturally based menopausal concerns that reveal how menopause is perceived and defined by them. Implications: Understanding the fact that what really a woman goes through during her menopause experience and knowing multiple dimensions of women?s menopause perception, can help health care providers to promote woman?s health by providing support, education, and performing necessary interventions. Increasing patient?s self efficacy can be performed while considering patient?s cultural sensitivities. Patient education can reform wrong cultural beliefs and myths regarding menopause. In addition information gained from the women?s menopause experiences can be used as a resource to support future community public health programming and appropriate policy changes necessary to ensure continued positive social change for this vulnerable group of women.en
dc.subjectMenopauseen
dc.subjectGrounded Theoryen
dc.subjectQualitative Researchen
dc.date.available2016-09-16T14:24:27Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-16-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-16T14:24:27Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Connection 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
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