2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620378
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing Student Nurse Leaders: A Multidimensional Approach
Other Titles:
Leaders for the Future: Cultivating Leadership in Students
Author(s):
Gaylle, Debrayh; Malloy, Suzanne E.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Gamma
Author Details:
Debrayh Gaylle, RN, debrayh.gaylle@sjsu.edu; Suzanne E. Malloy, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, September 19, 2016: The cultivation of future nurse leaders occurs primarily during students' academic formative years of nursing school. Through active nursing organization memberships (Akans, M., Harrington, M., McCash, J., Child,A., Gripentrog, J., Cole, S., Fitzgerald, K., ...Fuehr, P., 2013) and peer mentoring experiences (Wong,C., Stake-Doucet, N., Lombardo, C., Sanzone, L., & Tsimicalis, A., 2016; Ford, Y., 2016), student nurses acquire a skill set to prepare them for future leadership roles. The purpose of this presentation is to share a mentoring model for developing future nurse leaders. This project was implemented while student nurses attended a large west coast public university?s nursing program. The mentoring program focused on students? personal development. The format provided a framework for future leadership roles in nursing. The goals were to promote advancement and self-confidence in future nurse leaders, while allowing for other common leadership characteristics to flourish. This program evolved over time, with each success leading to other achievements. Three programs will be discussed as examples for other schools interested in promoting student leadership. A large local chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International was one of the first nationally to develop a template for a chapter student nurse intern program (1996). The roles and responsibilities of student interns, selected annually, evolved and were consistently focused on personal and professional leadership development. Board members volunteered to act as mentors to these students. Various intern accomplishments over the years included: (1) Assisting in developing an annual newsletter for chapter, (2) Assisting with annual induction planning and registrations; developing chapter programs and flyers promoting programs, (3) Presenting as part of an induction keynote panel focusing on experiences of being an intern (4) Leading monthly meetings (with assistance)/ presenting research for the board/volunteering to take officer meeting minutes, (5) Writing articles summarizing experiences from Biennial/other regional nursing conferences, and (6) Attending conferences for STTI, (paid by chapter) with board members and some interns presented with a chapter board member. As a result of the student interns? experiences, it was obvious to the Board members, that student interns increased their personal self-confidence, their leadership abilities, and learned from their nurse leader mentors. A second positive mentorship plan was a student nurse peer-advising program that developed over the past 5-6 years at this same University. A gap existed in prospective students needing additional nursing program information and hand-holding through the application process for the B.S. nursing program. Many students felt they had something to offer others, and volunteered to be peer advisers. A formalized program is now offered every semester, for prospective peer advisers. Peers buddy with another student to assist in advising, being available for 3 hours per week. Additionally, they journal about activities and discuss what they personally feel about the experience. At the end of the semester, the group of students also meets with the adviser, to share findings with one another. Through this program they have worked as team members, and learned how to use resources, work cooperatively, and communicate effectively. Most peer advisers continue to volunteer the following semesters. A third program focused on the development of various student leadership organizations and these too, have become instrumental in student nurses? growth. This University?s nursing program is largely ethnically-diverse with less than 27% of the students being Caucasian. The program includes 400 Undergraduate BS Nursing majors. Some students come into the program quite shy and hesitant to speak in front of others. Faculty encourage memberships in student organizations. This opportunity allows a comfortable venue for these students to network with others and promote students? personal development. It also helps individuals to become more competitive for scholarships and future jobs. Many join more than one organization and often become chapter officers, as well. Chapter officers have been instrumental in initiating programs and motivating others to become involved. Each semester level has its own set of officers and many students belong to other nursing clubs. These additional groups include the California Student Nurse Assn. (CSNA), Examinus Discipulus Club ?which is dedicated to scholarship and sharing, SBAN- the South Bay Assembly for Nursing (formerly A Male Nurses Assn.), Nurses for Christian Fellowship, and a Public Health nurses group. Approximately 10 years ago or more, our school had six different ethnic student nursing groups at the same time. Ironically, students joined the groups their friends were in, rather than those of their own ethnic population (i.e, A Vietnamese student could easily be the President of the Filipino club). There were groups for African-Americans, Filipino, Vietnamese, Hispanic, and CSNA students. Many belonged to multiple clubs. As years went on, these aforementioned organizations were subsumed into the current ones. Faculty consistently act as advisers and mentors; they also volunteer as guest speakers - sharing their own career development and activities. They have a vested interest in their students? development. As a result of the aforementioned activities, students developed various leadership styles that will positively influence future nursing practice and health care organizations. Such behaviors as learning to negotiate, using resources wisely, coordinating and communicating effectively with others, facilitating the group process, and learning to be team players have advanced these students? leadership skills. The goal at this University has always been to mentor the next generation of nurse leaders. This presentation will share those experiences. Akans, M., Harrington M., McCash J., Childs, J., Gripentrog, J., Cole, S., Fitzgerald, K., Searing, K., & Fuehr, P. (2013) Cultivating future nurse leaders with student nurses associations. Nursing for Women's Health, 17(4), 343-346. Ford, Y. (2015). Development of nurse self-concept in nursing students: The effects of a peer-mentoring experience. Journal of Nursing Education, 54(9, Suppl.), S107-S111. Wong, C., Stake-Doucet, N., Lombardo, C., Sanzone, L., & Tsimicalis, A. (2016). An integrative review of peer mentorship programs for undergraduate nursing students. Journal of Nursing Education, 55(3), 141-149.
Keywords:
leadership; mentoring; students
Repository Posting Date:
16-Sep-2016
Date of Publication:
16-Sep-2016
Other Identifiers:
LEAD16L01
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Leadership Connection 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleDeveloping Student Nurse Leaders: A Multidimensional Approachen
dc.title.alternativeLeaders for the Future: Cultivating Leadership in Studentsen
dc.contributor.authorGaylle, Debrayhen
dc.contributor.authorMalloy, Suzanne E.en
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Gammaen
dc.author.detailsDebrayh Gaylle, RN, debrayh.gaylle@sjsu.edu; Suzanne E. Malloy, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620378-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, September 19, 2016: The cultivation of future nurse leaders occurs primarily during students' academic formative years of nursing school. Through active nursing organization memberships (Akans, M., Harrington, M., McCash, J., Child,A., Gripentrog, J., Cole, S., Fitzgerald, K., ...Fuehr, P., 2013) and peer mentoring experiences (Wong,C., Stake-Doucet, N., Lombardo, C., Sanzone, L., & Tsimicalis, A., 2016; Ford, Y., 2016), student nurses acquire a skill set to prepare them for future leadership roles. The purpose of this presentation is to share a mentoring model for developing future nurse leaders. This project was implemented while student nurses attended a large west coast public university?s nursing program. The mentoring program focused on students? personal development. The format provided a framework for future leadership roles in nursing. The goals were to promote advancement and self-confidence in future nurse leaders, while allowing for other common leadership characteristics to flourish. This program evolved over time, with each success leading to other achievements. Three programs will be discussed as examples for other schools interested in promoting student leadership. A large local chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International was one of the first nationally to develop a template for a chapter student nurse intern program (1996). The roles and responsibilities of student interns, selected annually, evolved and were consistently focused on personal and professional leadership development. Board members volunteered to act as mentors to these students. Various intern accomplishments over the years included: (1) Assisting in developing an annual newsletter for chapter, (2) Assisting with annual induction planning and registrations; developing chapter programs and flyers promoting programs, (3) Presenting as part of an induction keynote panel focusing on experiences of being an intern (4) Leading monthly meetings (with assistance)/ presenting research for the board/volunteering to take officer meeting minutes, (5) Writing articles summarizing experiences from Biennial/other regional nursing conferences, and (6) Attending conferences for STTI, (paid by chapter) with board members and some interns presented with a chapter board member. As a result of the student interns? experiences, it was obvious to the Board members, that student interns increased their personal self-confidence, their leadership abilities, and learned from their nurse leader mentors. A second positive mentorship plan was a student nurse peer-advising program that developed over the past 5-6 years at this same University. A gap existed in prospective students needing additional nursing program information and hand-holding through the application process for the B.S. nursing program. Many students felt they had something to offer others, and volunteered to be peer advisers. A formalized program is now offered every semester, for prospective peer advisers. Peers buddy with another student to assist in advising, being available for 3 hours per week. Additionally, they journal about activities and discuss what they personally feel about the experience. At the end of the semester, the group of students also meets with the adviser, to share findings with one another. Through this program they have worked as team members, and learned how to use resources, work cooperatively, and communicate effectively. Most peer advisers continue to volunteer the following semesters. A third program focused on the development of various student leadership organizations and these too, have become instrumental in student nurses? growth. This University?s nursing program is largely ethnically-diverse with less than 27% of the students being Caucasian. The program includes 400 Undergraduate BS Nursing majors. Some students come into the program quite shy and hesitant to speak in front of others. Faculty encourage memberships in student organizations. This opportunity allows a comfortable venue for these students to network with others and promote students? personal development. It also helps individuals to become more competitive for scholarships and future jobs. Many join more than one organization and often become chapter officers, as well. Chapter officers have been instrumental in initiating programs and motivating others to become involved. Each semester level has its own set of officers and many students belong to other nursing clubs. These additional groups include the California Student Nurse Assn. (CSNA), Examinus Discipulus Club ?which is dedicated to scholarship and sharing, SBAN- the South Bay Assembly for Nursing (formerly A Male Nurses Assn.), Nurses for Christian Fellowship, and a Public Health nurses group. Approximately 10 years ago or more, our school had six different ethnic student nursing groups at the same time. Ironically, students joined the groups their friends were in, rather than those of their own ethnic population (i.e, A Vietnamese student could easily be the President of the Filipino club). There were groups for African-Americans, Filipino, Vietnamese, Hispanic, and CSNA students. Many belonged to multiple clubs. As years went on, these aforementioned organizations were subsumed into the current ones. Faculty consistently act as advisers and mentors; they also volunteer as guest speakers - sharing their own career development and activities. They have a vested interest in their students? development. As a result of the aforementioned activities, students developed various leadership styles that will positively influence future nursing practice and health care organizations. Such behaviors as learning to negotiate, using resources wisely, coordinating and communicating effectively with others, facilitating the group process, and learning to be team players have advanced these students? leadership skills. The goal at this University has always been to mentor the next generation of nurse leaders. This presentation will share those experiences. Akans, M., Harrington M., McCash J., Childs, J., Gripentrog, J., Cole, S., Fitzgerald, K., Searing, K., & Fuehr, P. (2013) Cultivating future nurse leaders with student nurses associations. Nursing for Women's Health, 17(4), 343-346. Ford, Y. (2015). Development of nurse self-concept in nursing students: The effects of a peer-mentoring experience. Journal of Nursing Education, 54(9, Suppl.), S107-S111. Wong, C., Stake-Doucet, N., Lombardo, C., Sanzone, L., & Tsimicalis, A. (2016). An integrative review of peer mentorship programs for undergraduate nursing students. Journal of Nursing Education, 55(3), 141-149.en
dc.subjectleadershipen
dc.subjectmentoringen
dc.subjectstudentsen
dc.date.available2016-09-16T14:25:14Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-16-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-16T14:25:14Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Connection 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
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