Nursing Leadership in a Greenfield Hospital: Strategies for Success

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620430
Title:
Nursing Leadership in a Greenfield Hospital: Strategies for Success
Other Titles:
Leadership Strategies in the Clinical Setting
Author(s):
Gubanc-Anderson, Dawn M.; Mason, Julia
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Mu
Author Details:
Dawn M. Gubanc-Anderson, RN, NEA-BC, CHEP, FACHE, dgubancanderson@gmail.com; Julia Mason, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, September 19, 2016: A “sea change” has arrived in healthcare- and is certainly here to stay. Changes in healthcare reimbursement, enhanced expectations for improved clinical outcomes, and the consumer demand for an outstanding patient experience make today’s nurse leader hungry for effective leadership styles (Oreg & Berson, 2011).  This desire can be the greatest when faced with leading in a start-up organization (Mueller, Volery, & Von Siemens, 2012). In healthcare, a start-up organization may include healthcare projects spanning from the creation of a Greenfield hospital, to the development of a new ambulatory clinic or the construction of a school of nursing.  The purpose of this presentation is to compare and contrast effective nursing leadership styles used during the design, planning, activation, and operation of a Greenfield community hospital in the mid-western United States.  A review of the transformational and servant leadership styles employed during this project will be presented. Human capital, without a doubt, is the most important asset in the development of a Greenfield hospital.  Competent nursing leaders need to understand how to utilize their teams effectively to achieve the many tasks at hand. Leading in a start-up organization requires vision, strategy, and excellent project management skills.  Transformational leadership can effectively address each of these requirements (Sadeghin & Pihie, 2012). Transformational leaders inspire, energize, and intellectually stimulate their employees (Bass, 1991).  “Transformational leadership redefines people’s missions and visions, renews their commitment, and restructures their systems for goal accomplishment through a relationship of mutual stimulation and elevation that converts followers into leaders and leaders into moral agents of an organization (http://www.brighthub.com/office/home/articles/71743.aspx, 2016).” Servant leadership was also routinely applied in this Greenfield hospital project.  Robert Greenleaf created the servant leadership theory in the 1970’s.  Servant leadership has grown in popularity over the past 10 years in healthcare. Greenleaf’s theory challenges leaders to influence others through relationships and developing the unique skills of the healthcare team members (Greenleaf, 1977).  Team members have input into decision making based upon the organization’s mission and vision. Servant leaders create loyal followers in response to the positive attention they give (Greenleaf, 1977). Characteristic skills of a servant leader include; active listening, empathy, awareness, foresight, persuasion, stewardship and a commitment to growth and community building (Waterman, 2011). In conclusion, this presentation will offer a look into the nursing leadership styles used in the successful creation of a Greenfield hospital.  Supportive theory, lived experience, and research outcomes will be shared during this presentation.
Keywords:
Greenfield Hospital; Transformational Nursing Leadership[; Servant Nursing Leadership
Repository Posting Date:
16-Sep-2016
Date of Publication:
16-Sep-2016
Other Identifiers:
LEAD16N01
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Leadership Connection 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleNursing Leadership in a Greenfield Hospital: Strategies for Successen
dc.title.alternativeLeadership Strategies in the Clinical Settingen
dc.contributor.authorGubanc-Anderson, Dawn M.en
dc.contributor.authorMason, Juliaen
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Muen
dc.author.detailsDawn M. Gubanc-Anderson, RN, NEA-BC, CHEP, FACHE, dgubancanderson@gmail.com; Julia Mason, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620430-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, September 19, 2016: A “sea change” has arrived in healthcare- and is certainly here to stay. Changes in healthcare reimbursement, enhanced expectations for improved clinical outcomes, and the consumer demand for an outstanding patient experience make today’s nurse leader hungry for effective leadership styles (Oreg & Berson, 2011).  This desire can be the greatest when faced with leading in a start-up organization (Mueller, Volery, & Von Siemens, 2012). In healthcare, a start-up organization may include healthcare projects spanning from the creation of a Greenfield hospital, to the development of a new ambulatory clinic or the construction of a school of nursing.  The purpose of this presentation is to compare and contrast effective nursing leadership styles used during the design, planning, activation, and operation of a Greenfield community hospital in the mid-western United States.  A review of the transformational and servant leadership styles employed during this project will be presented. Human capital, without a doubt, is the most important asset in the development of a Greenfield hospital.  Competent nursing leaders need to understand how to utilize their teams effectively to achieve the many tasks at hand. Leading in a start-up organization requires vision, strategy, and excellent project management skills.  Transformational leadership can effectively address each of these requirements (Sadeghin & Pihie, 2012). Transformational leaders inspire, energize, and intellectually stimulate their employees (Bass, 1991).  “Transformational leadership redefines people’s missions and visions, renews their commitment, and restructures their systems for goal accomplishment through a relationship of mutual stimulation and elevation that converts followers into leaders and leaders into moral agents of an organization (http://www.brighthub.com/office/home/articles/71743.aspx, 2016).” Servant leadership was also routinely applied in this Greenfield hospital project.  Robert Greenleaf created the servant leadership theory in the 1970’s.  Servant leadership has grown in popularity over the past 10 years in healthcare. Greenleaf’s theory challenges leaders to influence others through relationships and developing the unique skills of the healthcare team members (Greenleaf, 1977).  Team members have input into decision making based upon the organization’s mission and vision. Servant leaders create loyal followers in response to the positive attention they give (Greenleaf, 1977). Characteristic skills of a servant leader include; active listening, empathy, awareness, foresight, persuasion, stewardship and a commitment to growth and community building (Waterman, 2011). In conclusion, this presentation will offer a look into the nursing leadership styles used in the successful creation of a Greenfield hospital.  Supportive theory, lived experience, and research outcomes will be shared during this presentation.en
dc.subjectGreenfield Hospitalen
dc.subjectTransformational Nursing Leadership[en
dc.subjectServant Nursing Leadershipen
dc.date.available2016-09-16T14:26:05Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-16-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-16T14:26:05Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Connection 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
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