2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620440
Title:
Servant Leadership in the Emergency Room
Author(s):
Joyner, Chris Allen
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Chris Allen Joyner, RN, caj_paramedic_rn@hotmail.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, September 19, 2016: Servant Leadership in the Emergency Room. Abstract: Doing business the same way it was done ten years ago is not feasible and will cause the facility to fall behind the times and become stagnant. Having fresh ideas and processes are inevitable to keep up with the ever-changing ways of healthcare. The key is to not chase a specific metric, especially when dealing with patient satisfaction, but to observe the overall process. Servant leadership is a tool that when implemented raises the patients satisfaction and increases the scores for the metrics. It is also important to remember the success is measured from the patient’s point of view not the staff.  To meet the needs of change it is imperative the culture of the facility be changed instead of a specific metric. If a specific metric is chased then the focus and goal will change every month. With a culture it is not an end goal but an ever-evolving practice where all are expected to participate. This new culture is servant leadership and serving the patient rather than feeling like they owe the nurse for being there. This new servant leadership culture seeks to anticipate the needs and desires of the patient and proactively strives to meet them. Eventually this culture of teamwork will be the expected normal and focusing on the patient. When teamwork makes the patient the focus, the metrics will reach the goals. Reaching the goal is accomplished through a process revealing the strengths, weakness, opportunities and threats. By understanding the weakness the team focused on how to be a servant and overcome the weaknesses. When everyone feels they are important, they have a voice in the process, and can observe the influence from senior leadership the new values will evolve and become the expected culture (Joyner, 2015). This project helped to change the culture of the facility and improve the service and satisfaction that the patients felt when they visited the department. Though there were some initial setbacks the overall results were positive and prove that servant leadership has a place in bedside care in the emergency room. The culture is mentored by a stable leadership will improve patient satisfaction scores.
Keywords:
Servant leadership; Transformational leadership; Change management
Repository Posting Date:
16-Sep-2016
Date of Publication:
16-Sep-2016
Other Identifiers:
LEAD16PST131
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
Leadership Connection 2016
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleServant Leadership in the Emergency Roomen
dc.contributor.authorJoyner, Chris Allenen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsChris Allen Joyner, RN, caj_paramedic_rn@hotmail.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620440-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, September 19, 2016: Servant Leadership in the Emergency Room. Abstract: Doing business the same way it was done ten years ago is not feasible and will cause the facility to fall behind the times and become stagnant. Having fresh ideas and processes are inevitable to keep up with the ever-changing ways of healthcare. The key is to not chase a specific metric, especially when dealing with patient satisfaction, but to observe the overall process. Servant leadership is a tool that when implemented raises the patients satisfaction and increases the scores for the metrics. It is also important to remember the success is measured from the patient’s point of view not the staff.  To meet the needs of change it is imperative the culture of the facility be changed instead of a specific metric. If a specific metric is chased then the focus and goal will change every month. With a culture it is not an end goal but an ever-evolving practice where all are expected to participate. This new culture is servant leadership and serving the patient rather than feeling like they owe the nurse for being there. This new servant leadership culture seeks to anticipate the needs and desires of the patient and proactively strives to meet them. Eventually this culture of teamwork will be the expected normal and focusing on the patient. When teamwork makes the patient the focus, the metrics will reach the goals. Reaching the goal is accomplished through a process revealing the strengths, weakness, opportunities and threats. By understanding the weakness the team focused on how to be a servant and overcome the weaknesses. When everyone feels they are important, they have a voice in the process, and can observe the influence from senior leadership the new values will evolve and become the expected culture (Joyner, 2015). This project helped to change the culture of the facility and improve the service and satisfaction that the patients felt when they visited the department. Though there were some initial setbacks the overall results were positive and prove that servant leadership has a place in bedside care in the emergency room. The culture is mentored by a stable leadership will improve patient satisfaction scores.en
dc.subjectServant leadershipen
dc.subjectTransformational leadershipen
dc.subjectChange managementen
dc.date.available2016-09-16T14:26:15Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-16-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-16T14:26:15Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Connection 2016en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Connection 2016 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
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