Evaluation of a School Nurse-Led Obesity Program for Severely Obese New York City Public School Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620876
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Report
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
Mixed/Multi Method Research
Title:
Evaluation of a School Nurse-Led Obesity Program for Severely Obese New York City Public School Students
Author(s):
Schroeder, Krista; Jia, Haomiao; Wang, Y. Claire; Smaldone, Arlene
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Zeta
Author Details:
Krista Schroeder, PhD, RN, CCRN, corresponding author, email: krista.lee.schroeder@gmail.com; Haomiao Jia, PhD; Y. Claire Wang, MD, ScD; Arlene Smaldone, PhD, CPNP, CDE.
Abstract:

The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to evaluate the Healthy Options and Physical Activity Program (HOP), a school nurse-led childhood obesity initiative for severely obese New York City Public School students. Aims 1, 2, and 3 employed a retrospective cohort design and examined program implementation and the effect of HOP on health behavior change and change in BMI percentile; Aim 4 employed a qualitative design to provide context and inform recommendations to more fully deploy HOP within the New York City school system. The formal aims of the study are as follows:

Aim 1) Examine demographic and medical characteristics of children who are eligible for HOP

Aim 2) Examine implementation of HOP, including session frequency, session content, and factors associated with participant enrollment

Aim 3) Examine impact of HOP on BMI percentile change, school absences, and school nurse visits

Aim 4) Explore school nurses’ perceptions of factors that promote or hinder optimal implementation of HOP

Keywords:
Nursing; Obesity; School administrators/school health; Childhood obesity; Mixed methods; Meta-analysis
MeSH:
Pediatric Obesity--prevention & control
CINAHL Headings:
Pediatric Obesity; School Health Education; School Health Services
Repository Posting Date:
7-Oct-2016
Date of Publication:
7-Oct-2016
Sponsors:
This research was supported by Sigma Theta Tau International through a Small Grant, the National Institute of Nursing Research through Grant Number T32 NR014205, and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences through Grant Number UL1 TR000040. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH. The authors would also like to acknowledge the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (CT, TA, KK, JH) for their assistance with this research project and manuscript development.
Description:
Acknowledgements: This research was supported by Sigma Theta Tau International through a Small Grant, the National Institute of Nursing Research through Grant Number T32 NR014205, and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences through Grant Number UL1 TR000040. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH. The authors would also like to acknowledge the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (CT, TA, KK, JH) for their assistance with this research project. Conflict of Interest Statement: No conflicts of interest exist. Human Subjects Protections: Institutional Review Board approval was obtained from Columbia University Medical Center, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, and the New York City Department of Education.
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeReporten
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachMixed/Multi Method Researchen
dc.titleEvaluation of a School Nurse-Led Obesity Program for Severely Obese New York City Public School Studentsen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchroeder, Kristaen
dc.contributor.authorJia, Haomiaoen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Y. Claireen
dc.contributor.authorSmaldone, Arleneen
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Zetaen
dc.author.detailsKrista Schroeder, PhD, RN, CCRN, corresponding author, email: krista.lee.schroeder@gmail.com; Haomiao Jia, PhD; Y. Claire Wang, MD, ScD; Arlene Smaldone, PhD, CPNP, CDE.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620876-
dc.description.abstract<p>The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to evaluate the Healthy Options and Physical Activity Program (HOP), a school nurse-led childhood obesity initiative for severely obese New York City Public School students. Aims 1, 2, and 3 employed a retrospective cohort design and examined program implementation and the effect of HOP on health behavior change and change in BMI percentile; Aim 4 employed a qualitative design to provide context and inform recommendations to more fully deploy HOP within the New York City school system. The formal aims of the study are as follows:</p> <p>Aim 1) Examine demographic and medical characteristics of children who are eligible for HOP</p> <p>Aim 2) Examine implementation of HOP, including session frequency, session content, and factors associated with participant enrollment</p> <p>Aim 3) Examine impact of HOP on BMI percentile change, school absences, and school nurse visits</p> <p>Aim 4) Explore school nurses’ perceptions of factors that promote or hinder optimal implementation of HOP</p>en
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.subjectObesityen
dc.subjectSchool administrators/school healthen
dc.subjectChildhood obesityen
dc.subjectMixed methodsen
dc.subjectMeta-analysisen
dc.subject.meshPediatric Obesity--prevention & controlen
dc.subject.cinahlPediatric Obesityen
dc.subject.cinahlSchool Health Educationen
dc.subject.cinahlSchool Health Servicesen
dc.date.available2016-10-07T19:52:04Z-
dc.date.issued2016-10-07-
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-07T19:52:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by Sigma Theta Tau International through a Small Grant, the National Institute of Nursing Research through Grant Number T32 NR014205, and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences through Grant Number UL1 TR000040. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH. The authors would also like to acknowledge the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (CT, TA, KK, JH) for their assistance with this research project and manuscript development.en
dc.descriptionAcknowledgements: This research was supported by Sigma Theta Tau International through a Small Grant, the National Institute of Nursing Research through Grant Number T32 NR014205, and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences through Grant Number UL1 TR000040. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH. The authors would also like to acknowledge the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (CT, TA, KK, JH) for their assistance with this research project. Conflict of Interest Statement: No conflicts of interest exist. Human Subjects Protections: Institutional Review Board approval was obtained from Columbia University Medical Center, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, and the New York City Department of Education.en
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.en
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