The Effectiveness of an Interactive Theatre Intervention on Improving Adherence to Self-Management Regimens for Breast Cancer-related Lymphedema

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620907
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Research Study
Level of Evidence:
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Approach:
Pilot/Exploratory Study
Title:
The Effectiveness of an Interactive Theatre Intervention on Improving Adherence to Self-Management Regimens for Breast Cancer-related Lymphedema
Author(s):
Ostby, Pamela L. ( 0000-0001-5098-1191 )
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Iota
Author Details:
Pamela L. Ostby, PhD, RN, OCN, ostbypo1@charter.net
Abstract:

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of an interactive theatre (IT) intervention bundled with printed information to printed information alone in improving adherence to self-management of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) and perceptions of self-efficacy. The research questions included: (1) What is the effectiveness of an IT intervention bundled with printed information about BCRL on adherence to self-management regimens among breast cancer survivors with BCRL compared to printed information about BCRL alone? and (2) What is the effectiveness of an IT intervention bundled with printed information about BCRL on improving patient perceptions of self-efficacy and self-regulation compared to printed information alone?

Methods:  Thirty-six female breast cancer survivors with BCRL were randomized into one of two study groups: a group that received printed information about BCRL [hereafter, control group] (n = 19), and an intervention group that received printed information and attended an IT performance (n = 17). Circumferential and perometric measures were taken at a baseline visit to document BCRL status and valid, reliable questionnaires relevant to symptom management, self-efficacy, and self-regulation were administered pre- and post-intervention.

Results:  The analysis comparing outcome measures of both groups in this study did not reach statistical significance; however, there were positive indications that the intervention group did slightly better in respect to perceptions of self-efficacy/self-regulation and with taking action for managing the same symptoms pre- and post-intervention. Statistical significance was achieved (p = 0.0169) with an analysis of both groups in regard to taking action to manage all symptoms, regardless of the time period in which they occurred.

Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that an interactive format, such as IT, may positively influence symptom management. A limitation of this study was the small sample size; however, continued study with a larger sample size is warranted to further examine the outcome measures in this study population using IT.     

Keywords:
Breast cancer-related lymphedema; Adherence; Self-efficacy
MeSH:
Patient Education; Self Care
CINAHL Headings:
Breast Neoplasms--Complications; Lymphedema; Patient Compliance
Repository Posting Date:
11-Oct-2016
Date of Publication:
11-Oct-2016
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
MASCC/ISOO Annual Meeting on Supportive Care in Cancer; Oral e-Poster presentation: Psycho-oncology and Survivorship
Conference Host:
MASCC/ISOO Annual Meeting on Supportive Care in Cancer
Conference Location:
Adelaide, Australia
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International; Midwest Nursing Research Society; Ellis Fischel Cancer Center; Center for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research, University of Missouri
Description:
Embargo process completed and granted for one year.
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.evidence.levelRandomized Controlled Trialen
dc.research.approachPilot/Exploratory Studyen
dc.titleThe Effectiveness of an Interactive Theatre Intervention on Improving Adherence to Self-Management Regimens for Breast Cancer-related Lymphedemaen_US
dc.contributor.authorOstby, Pamela L.en
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Iotaen
dc.author.detailsPamela L. Ostby, PhD, RN, OCN, ostbypo1@charter.neten
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620907-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong>The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of an interactive theatre (IT) intervention bundled with printed information to printed information alone in improving adherence to self-management of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) and perceptions of self-efficacy. The research questions included: (1) What is the effectiveness of an IT intervention bundled with printed information about BCRL on adherence to self-management regimens among breast cancer survivors with BCRL compared to printed information about BCRL alone? and (2) What is the effectiveness of an IT intervention bundled with printed information about BCRL on improving patient perceptions of self-efficacy and self-regulation compared to printed information alone?</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong>  Thirty-six female breast cancer survivors with BCRL were randomized into one of two study groups: a group that received printed information about BCRL [hereafter, control group] (n = 19), and an intervention group that received printed information and attended an IT performance (n = 17). Circumferential and perometric measures were taken at a baseline visit to document BCRL status and valid, reliable questionnaires relevant to symptom management, self-efficacy, and self-regulation were administered pre- and post-intervention.</p> <p><strong>Results:  </strong>The analysis comparing outcome measures of both groups in this study did not reach statistical significance; however, there were positive indications that the intervention group did slightly better in respect to perceptions of self-efficacy/self-regulation and with taking action for managing the same symptoms pre- and post-intervention. Statistical significance was achieved (p = 0.0169) with an analysis of both groups in regard to taking action to manage all symptoms, regardless of the time period in which they occurred.</p> <p><strong>Conclusions: </strong>The findings of this study suggest that an interactive format, such as IT, may positively influence symptom management. A limitation of this study was the small sample size; however, continued study with a larger sample size is warranted to further examine the outcome measures in this study population using IT.     </p>en
dc.subjectBreast cancer-related lymphedemaen
dc.subjectAdherenceen
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen
dc.subject.meshPatient Educationen
dc.subject.meshSelf Careen
dc.subject.cinahlBreast Neoplasms--Complicationsen
dc.subject.cinahlLymphedemaen
dc.subject.cinahlPatient Complianceen
dc.date.available2016-10-11T18:54:11Z-
dc.date.issued2016-10-11-
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-11T18:54:11Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameMASCC/ISOO Annual Meeting on Supportive Care in Cancer; Oral e-Poster presentation: Psycho-oncology and Survivorshipen
dc.conference.hostMASCC/ISOO Annual Meeting on Supportive Care in Canceren
dc.conference.locationAdelaide, Australiaen
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen
dc.description.sponsorshipEllis Fischel Cancer Centeren
dc.description.sponsorshipCenter for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research, University of Missourien
dc.descriptionEmbargo process completed and granted for one year.en
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.en
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