Implementation of a Mentor Led Physical Activity Program among Disadvantaged Youth

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620917
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Implementation of a Mentor Led Physical Activity Program among Disadvantaged Youth
Author(s):
Martin, Karen M.
Additional Author Information:
Karen M. Martin, DNP, CNP, email: martin@hpwohio.org
Advisors:
Chen, Huey-Shys; Sink, Katherine; Lee, Yi-Hui
Degree:
DNP
Degree Year:
2016
Grantor:
University of Toledo
Abstract:

Physical activity is an integral part of the war on pediatric obesity.  Pediatric obesity is a worldwide epidemic affecting children of all races, classes, and gender.  According to the Ohio Youth Risk Behavior Survey of 2013 over one third of Ohio children in grades nine through twelve were considered overweight or obese and engage in more than three hours of screen time, television, computers or video games daily.  The purposes of this project was to introduce physical activity in the classroom environment in the form of physical activity breaks, led by physical activity leaders (PALs) to achieve improved BMI category, increase grade point average (GPA), and increase physical activity (measured by PACE score) of high school students in health class.  The Larrabee’s Model for Evidence Based Practice Change was used to guide the planning, implementation, and evaluation of this evidence based project. The intervention was delivered to an inner city high school in West Central Ohio.  Two health teachers and the project coordinator were enrolled and trained in Let’s Move Active Schools curriculum and served as PALs. The PALs designed physical activities and introduced physical actives in the classroom in the form of physical activity breaks for ten minutes.  Thirty eight freshman students in health class completed 8-week program. Results showed that there were significant differences in GPA and PACE score however there was no significant difference in body weight status due to short time frame of project. Project results will be disseminated to school administration with anticipation of inclusion of physical activity breaks for every classroom for the remainder of the school year and beyond.

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Keywords:
Youth; Mentor
CINAHL Headings:
Physical Activity; Mentorship; Pediatric Obesity; School Health Services; Urban Areas
Note:
This work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.
Repository Posting Date:
2016-10-11T18:05:43Z
Date of Publication:
2016-10-11

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorChen, Huey-Shysen
dc.contributor.advisorSink, Katherineen
dc.contributor.advisorLee, Yi-Huien
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Karen M.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-11T18:05:43Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-11T18:05:43Z-
dc.date.issued2016-10-11-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620917-
dc.description.abstract<p>Physical activity is an integral part of the war on pediatric obesity.  Pediatric obesity is a worldwide epidemic affecting children of all races, classes, and gender.  According to the Ohio Youth Risk Behavior Survey of 2013 over one third of Ohio children in grades nine through twelve were considered overweight or obese and engage in more than three hours of screen time, television, computers or video games daily.  The purposes of this project was to introduce physical activity in the classroom environment in the form of physical activity breaks, led by physical activity leaders (PALs) to achieve improved BMI category, increase grade point average (GPA), and increase physical activity (measured by PACE score) of high school students in health class.  The Larrabee’s Model for Evidence Based Practice Change was used to guide the planning, implementation, and evaluation of this evidence based project. The intervention was delivered to an inner city high school in West Central Ohio.  Two health teachers and the project coordinator were enrolled and trained in <em>Let’s Move Active Schools</em> curriculum and served as PALs. The PALs designed physical activities and introduced physical actives in the classroom in the form of physical activity breaks for ten minutes.  Thirty eight freshman students in health class completed 8-week program. Results showed that there were significant differences in GPA and PACE score however there was no significant difference in body weight status due to short time frame of project. Project results will be disseminated to school administration with anticipation of inclusion of physical activity breaks for every classroom for the remainder of the school year and beyond.</p> >en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectYouthen
dc.subjectMentoren
dc.titleImplementation of a Mentor Led Physical Activity Program among Disadvantaged Youthen_US
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Toledoen
thesis.degree.levelDNPen
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.en
dc.primary-author.detailsKaren M. Martin, DNP, CNP, email: martin@hpwohio.orgen
thesis.degree.year2016en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.subject.cinahlPhysical Activityen
dc.subject.cinahlMentorshipen
dc.subject.cinahlPediatric Obesityen
dc.subject.cinahlSchool Health Servicesen
dc.subject.cinahlUrban Areasen
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