How Nurse Work Environments Relate to the Presence of Parents in Neonatal Intensive Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/620955
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
Observational Study, Other (e.g., Prevalence, Incidence)
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
How Nurse Work Environments Relate to the Presence of Parents in Neonatal Intensive Care
Other Titles:
Award Title: Fostering the Optimal Contribution of Nurses to Parental Engagement in Neonatal Intensive Care
Author(s):
Hallowell, Sunny, G.; Lake, Eileen, T.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Nu
Abstract:

How Nurse Work Environments Relate to the Presence of Parents in Neonatal Intensive Care

Objective:  Parental presence in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is essential for families, especially mothers to participate in infant care and prepare for transition from hospital to home. However, NICUs vary in their policies on parent visitation and participation.  Nurses are the principal caregivers in the NICU.  The nurse work environment may influence whether parents spend time with their hospitalized infants.  A national dataset was used to examine the relationship between the work environment and parental presence in the NICU.

Design: Cross-sectional, observational.

Setting: NICU

Participants:    A national sample of 104 NICUs, in which 6,060 nurses reported about the 15,233 infants they cared for on their last shift.

Methods:  Secondary analysis was used to examine nurse survey data collected in 2008.  The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI), was used to measure the work environment across five domains and as a composite measure.  Analysis was conducted using Pearson correlation and bivariate regression models.

Results:  Parents of 60% (SD = 9.7%) of infants were present during the shift. The PES-NWI composite score and two domains - Nurse Participation in Hospital Affairs and Manager Leadership and Support, were significant predictors of parental presence.  A 1SD higher score in the composite or either subscale was associated with 2.5% more parents being present.

Conclusion: Parental presence in the NICU is significantly associated with better nurse work environments. NICUs where nurses are supported through managerial leadership and professional nursing activities are essential to a patient centered culture that facilitates parental presence. 

Keywords:
Parental Presence; Infant; Intensive Care, Neonatal; Nurse staffing; Nurse Work Environment; Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index
MeSH:
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
CINAHL Headings:
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal; Parental Attitudes; Work Environment; Nursing Practice
Repository Posting Date:
12-Oct-2016
Date of Publication:
12-Oct-2016
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
AcademyHealth 2016: Two presentations at the conference - Annual Research Meeting and Interdisciplinary Research Group on Nursing Issues Interest Group
Conference Host:
AcademyHealth: AcademyHealth is a leading national organization serving the fields of health services and policy research and the professionals who produce and use this important work. Together with our members, we offer programs and services that support the development and use of rigorous, relevant and timely evidence to increase the quality, accessibility, and value of health care, to reduce disparities, and to improve health. A trusted broker of information, AcademyHealth brings stakeholders together to address the current and future needs of an evolving health system, inform health policy, and translate evidence into action.
Conference Location:
Boston, Massachusetts, United States, June 24-28, 2016
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Description:
2015 Small Grant Award "Fostering the Optimal Contribution of Nurses to Parental Engagement in Neonatal Intensive Care". Sigma Theta Tau International, Honor Society of Nursing ($5000). Sunny Hallowell, PhD (PI); Eileen Lake (Mentor).
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelObservational Study, Other (e.g., Prevalence, Incidence)en
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.titleHow Nurse Work Environments Relate to the Presence of Parents in Neonatal Intensive Careen_US
dc.title.alternativeAward Title: Fostering the Optimal Contribution of Nurses to Parental Engagement in Neonatal Intensive Careen
dc.contributor.authorHallowell, Sunny, G.en
dc.contributor.authorLake, Eileen, T.en
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Nuen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/620955-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>How Nurse Work Environments Relate to the Presence of Parents in Neonatal Intensive Care</strong></p> <p><strong>Objective:</strong>  Parental presence in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is essential for families, especially mothers to participate in infant care and prepare for transition from hospital to home. However, NICUs vary in their policies on parent visitation and participation.  Nurses are the principal caregivers in the NICU.  The nurse work environment may influence whether parents spend time with their hospitalized infants.  A national dataset was used to examine the relationship between the work environment and parental presence in the NICU.</p> <p><strong>Design:</strong> Cross-sectional, observational.</p> <p><strong>Setting: </strong>NICU</p> <p><strong>Participants:</strong>    A national sample of 104 NICUs, in which 6,060 nurses reported about the 15,233 infants they cared for on their last shift.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong>  Secondary analysis was used to examine nurse survey data collected in 2008.  The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI), was used to measure the work environment across five domains and as a composite measure.  Analysis was conducted using Pearson correlation and bivariate regression models.</p> <p><strong>Results:  </strong>Parents of 60% (SD = 9.7%) of infants were present during the shift. The PES-NWI composite score and two domains - Nurse Participation in Hospital Affairs and Manager Leadership and Support, were significant predictors of parental presence.  A 1SD higher score in the composite or either subscale was associated with 2.5% more parents being present. <strong></strong></p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>Parental presence in the NICU is significantly associated with better nurse work environments. NICUs where nurses are supported through managerial leadership and professional nursing activities are essential to a patient centered culture that facilitates parental presence. </p>en
dc.subjectParental Presenceen
dc.subjectInfanten
dc.subjectIntensive Care, Neonatalen
dc.subjectNurse staffingen
dc.subjectNurse Work Environmenten
dc.subjectPractice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Indexen
dc.subject.meshPersonnel Staffing and Schedulingen
dc.subject.cinahlIntensive Care Units, Neonatalen
dc.subject.cinahlParental Attitudesen
dc.subject.cinahlWork Environmenten
dc.subject.cinahlNursing Practiceen
dc.date.available2016-10-12T16:58:06Z-
dc.date.issued2016-10-12-
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-12T16:58:06Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameAcademyHealth 2016: Two presentations at the conference - Annual Research Meeting and Interdisciplinary Research Group on Nursing Issues Interest Groupen
dc.conference.hostAcademyHealth: AcademyHealth is a leading national organization serving the fields of health services and policy research and the professionals who produce and use this important work. Together with our members, we offer programs and services that support the development and use of rigorous, relevant and timely evidence to increase the quality, accessibility, and value of health care, to reduce disparities, and to improve health. A trusted broker of information, AcademyHealth brings stakeholders together to address the current and future needs of an evolving health system, inform health policy, and translate evidence into action.en
dc.conference.locationBoston, Massachusetts, United States, June 24-28, 2016en
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.description2015 Small Grant Award "Fostering the Optimal Contribution of Nurses to Parental Engagement in Neonatal Intensive Care". Sigma Theta Tau International, Honor Society of Nursing ($5000). Sunny Hallowell, PhD (PI); Eileen Lake (Mentor).en
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.en
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